Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Pioneer Senior Fellow in Healthcare Josh Archambault about his newest research paper, produced with the Cicero Institute and the Reason Foundation, on states’ success in implementing telehealth to improve healthcare outcomes. They discuss how Massachusetts has used remote medicine to better reach patients and serve their needs.

Read the report here: https://bit.ly/50StateTelehealth.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with David Keane, immigrant from Australia and founder of Bigtincan, an artificial-intelligence-powered sales enablement platform for leading companies worldwide. David believes that what makes the U.S. special is its culture both of welcoming immigrants and being willing to try new things, to take risks. In the United States, visas and exchange programs have allowed for the movement of ideas, skills and knowledge into the country. For him, that movement of people is a risk worth taking. A diversity of thought and background can bring about incredible new ideas, products and services, like his industry-leading company, not to mention create thousands of jobs as he’s done over the years.  He wonders, though, about how the next generation of entrepreneurs will construct movement and sharing in a world of heightened globalization and connectedness, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers.

Guest:

Member Post

 

I remain intrigued by, and undecided about, the assertion that humans cannot return to the Moon. Not that I’ve been terribly concerned about Americans and space flight. I’ve been more concerned about myself and bicycle riding. Whether NASA is demonstrating that a collapse of will is the same as a loss of physical and intellectual […]

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Joe Selvaggi talks with Alva10 CEO and precision medicine expert Hannah Mamuszka about which tests are best for determining who is contagious and the implications for the CDC’s new isolation recommendations.

Guest:

Streaming Music in the 1930s and the 1890s

 

paris sewer phoneJust in time for the weekend, or your weekend frame of mind, return with me now to those thrilling days of yesteryear. Through the magic of radio, teleport back to the 1940s, slip through a warp back to the 1930s, and then jump back to the 1890s. At each stop you will find yourself with a piece of the present: streaming music services. I slipped into this current carried by an old-time radio podcast into sleep, only to wake and play the detective series episode again, listening to confirm my subconscious impression.

The detective was Jeff Regan, “the Lyon’s Eye,” Jack Webb’s third detective series on his way to Dragnet. Jack Webb was in San Francisco, already making his way on air in local radio, with his sights on the big time. He tried out Pat Novak for Hire in 1946, then made the national scene in 1947 with Johnny Madero, Pier 23. Johnny Madero rented boats and did private investigations to make ends meet. In 1948, Jack Webb premiered Jeff Regan, Investigator, playing a detective who works for a detective agency boss, getting paid $10 per day and expenses.

In this context, I heard an episode in which Jeff Regan solves the crime by observing that people were talking into a microphone in a bar to order up songs. The microphones, to help the story, were often open past the short commercial interaction, and these conversations were occasionally captured on records, cut in the central office, where all the discs were being spun and piped, steamed on demand if you will to the jukebox were the nickel or dime had been dropped, an early music micro-payment system.

Joe Biden: Destroying the Planet

 

Joe Biden claims to be saving the planet with his big all-electric vehicle push, but the reality is just the opposite. One sentence caught my eye:

“Blowing up a mountain isn’t green, no matter how much marketing spin people put on it,” Max Wilbert, an activist protesting a proposed lithium mine site in Nevada, told The New York Times in May.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with Dr. Marc Seifer, author of the acclaimed biography Wizard: The Life & Times of Nikola Tesla. He reviews what teachers and students should know about the life of Nikola Tesla, the world-renowned engineer, physicist, and inventor who is more widely known nowadays for the electric car and clean energy companies named for him. Dr. Seifer describes the remarkable variety of world-changing gadgets Tesla invented, along with his hundreds of patents, including the alternating-current electricity system (AC), the induction motor, radio-controlled technology and what students today can learn about STEM, inventions, and innovation from studying his work. They explore Tesla’s bitter rivalry with Thomas Edison, their “war of the currents,” and Tesla’s deep struggles with the business and commercial aspects of his work. They also delve into Tesla’s experience as a Serbian immigrant, interacting with a variety of powerful, Gilded Age elite figures, and the renaissance that his reputation has more recently enjoyed. The interview concludes with a reading from Dr. Seifer’s biography of Tesla.

Stories of the Week: What will President Biden’s Build Back Better plan mean for universal pre-Kindergarten education? Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is launching a five-year, $750 million effort to open access to charter schools for 150,000 more children in 20 cities across America. The Department of Education is expanding the Second Chance Pell program, allowing 200 colleges and universities to participate in prison education programs that can transforming lives and help people reenter society.

Jim and Greg are glad to see the public opposed by lopsided margins to many of the extreme provisions in the “Build Back Better” legislation. They also discuss new revelations about how involved Chris Cuomo was in helping his brother try to weather his many scandals. And they call foul on Twitter’s new policy banning any media unless everyone in the video or photo agrees to it.

 

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with virologist, Dr. Peter Kolchinsky, about the explosion of vaccine technologies and innovations brought into the spotlight by the massive investment to fight the pandemic, and dives deeply into the exciting promise of vaccines to combat an ever-widening range of disease.

Guest:

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with Prof. Paul Israel, Director & General Editor of the Thomas A. Edison Papers at Rutgers University, and author of Edison: A Life of Invention, the definitive biography of America’s greatest inventor. Professor Israel describes Edison’s public and private life, as well as the impact of his world-changing inventions, such as the hot-filament light bulb, the phonograph, and the motion-picture camera. Called the “Wizard of Menlo Park,” Edison is still the American with the most individual patents — 1,093 in the U.S. and 1,200 in 34 foreign countries. They discuss what educators and students in the 21st century can learn from how Edison ran the country’s first industrial research laboratory in New Jersey, and the importance of the U.S. Patent Office in protecting inventors’ exclusive right to profit from their inventions. They also discuss what students should learn about the role inventions have played in the historic success of the United States and in the highly dynamic and competitive global economy. Professor Israel concludes with a reading from his biography.

Stories of the Week:  The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) is celebrating its 75th anniversary of providing education for the children of American service members. Today, DoDEA operates 160 schools in eight districts across 11 countries, seven U.S. states and two U.S. territories for more than 67,000 students. (Read Pioneer’s related 2015 report.) In West Virginia, the Professional Charter School Board approved three applications for the state’s first ever charter public schools, which will provide another option for families who want and need a different learning environment.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Larry Kim, founder of WordStream in Boston, which was acquired for $150 million, and MobileMonkey, a chatbot marketing platform for marketing and customer support on Facebook Messenger, web chat and SMS. Larry’s parents fled to Canada after the Korean War on a one-way ticket. That in turn gave him the opportunity to purchase his own one-way ticket to the U.S. to fulfill his American dream. Larry is creating hundreds of meaningful jobs for Americans, something he’s not only proud of but feels is at the core of his values, to give back to the country that gave him the opportunity to actualize bold new ideas. Through his technology, he’s helped tens of thousands of companies to grow their businesses, and, with nearly 750,000 followers on Medium.com, he mentors budding entrepreneurs from around the world, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers.

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This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks to Prof. Roger Pielke, Jr., Professor of Climate Science at the University of Colorado, about the widening gap between the catastrophic predictions proffered at the COP26 Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland, and the less dire observations contained in the UN’s own recent IPCC report.

Guest:

Member Post

 

Critics of the food and drug administration will argue that it is a large bloated government organization that does more to delay and inhibit potential medical treatments than pursuing its own stated goal of protecting the public health by ensuring the safety & efficacy of certain products.  Items that fall under the FDA’s authority include […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy watching Terry McAuliffe make mistake after mistake in the homestretch of the Virginia governor’s race. They also welcome a Wall Street Journal report on the simple reality that only fossil fuels can meet our energy needs in terms of abundance and cost but fume that Democrats insist on pursuing policies that are not realistic and are sending prices much higher. And they they wince as reports suggest Democrats appear to be closing in on a consensus for a $2 trillion spending binge on far left priorities.

 

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Looking at the pickup truck that just arrived to apply lawn and pest control chemicals to my neighbor’s yard I began to wonder – instead of painting vehicles different colors at the factory, why not paint them all a single color (primer or white), and then have the dealer apply a color wrap in the […]

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To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before (Well, No 90-Year-Old Man)

 

The real Captain Kirk, the beloved William Shatner, has made it to the final frontier for real. At the age of 90, the intrepid Shatner visited space on Blue Origin’s New Shepard mission NS-18 today, Oct. 13, 2021.

Though Shatner is intrepid, he didn’t command the Intrepid. He commanded the Enterprise (and the Enterprise, and the Enterprise). The Intrepid, NCC-1631, had a Vulcan crew.

This week on JobMakers, Host Denzil Mohammed talks with Dr. Bernat Olle, co-founder and CEO of Vedanta Biosciences, about his journey from Catalonia, Spain, to Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he continued his Chemical Engineering studies at MIT. Navigating the complex immigration system while seeking purpose in his career, he eventually found his calling and was lucky enough to remain in the U.S. to see it through: designing a new class of medicines to modulate the human microbiome. They duscuss how everyone wins when foreign-born talent is welcomed into vibrant, entrepreneurial ecosystems like those in the U.S., when they’re able to collaborate with others from the U.S. and around the world and come up with incredible ideas to benefit all people. Bernat also expresses a sense of kinship with immigrants far removed from the labs and boardrooms. He knows that the same aspiration – opportunity – attracted those who came here with nothing but a suitcase and a dream, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers.

Guest:
Dr. Bernat Olle is a co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Vedanta Biosciences. He has been a member of the founding teams of several companies of the PureTech portfolio and served as a member of the Board of Directors of Vedanta Biosciences and Follica Biosciences. In 2013 Dr. Olle was named “Innovator of the Year” in MIT Technology Review Spain’s “Innovators under 35” awards. He also received the 2019 Barry M. Portnoy Immigrant Entrepreneur Award from The Immigrant Learning Center. He completed his doctoral work at the Chemical Engineering Department at MIT, where he developed a novel method for large-scale bacterial culture. During his graduate work, Dr. Olle was awarded the “la Caixa” fellowship. Dr. Olle received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Universitat Rovira i Virgili, in Catalonia, his M.S. and PhD. in Chemical Engineering Practice from MIT, and his M.B.A. from the MIT Sloan School of Management. He has published his work in journals including Nature and Nature Biotechnology.

Jim and Greg get a kick out of Democrats being frustrated that giving away a ton of money in the “COVID relief” bill is not helping them much politically. They also cringe as a departing Pentagon official warns that China is so far ahead of us in cybersecurity and artificial intelligence that we look like kindergarteners by comparison. And they rip into the Loudoun County, Virginia, school board for apparently covering up a brutal sexual assault against a ninth grade girl in order to advance their transgender agenda.