Join host Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer’s Bill Smith in a conversation with Hannah Mamuszka, expert in diagnostic medicine, on why the U.S. lacked adequate early testing, what current testing looks like in the Commonwealth, and where testing technology needs to be to support public gatherings in the future.

Hannah Mamuszka is Founder & CEO of ALVA10, a healthcare technology firm. Hannah has spent her 20+ year career in diagnostics – both in pharma and at diagnostics companies, in the lab and on the business side. She believes that the challenges of diagnostic technology fully impacting patient care are more commercial than technical, and conceived of ALVA10 to create a mechanism to pull technology into healthcare by aligning incentives through data. She regularly speaks on issues regarding advancement of technology in healthcare, is on the Board of Directors for two diagnostic companies and writes a column on the value of diagnostics for the Journal of Precision Medicine.

More

It’s all crazy martinis today! Join Jim and Greg as they respond to MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski begging Twitter to start censoring Trump’s tweets. They also have little use for Matt Lauer re-emerging and portraying himself as a victim. And they unload on the bizarre coverage of Joe Biden’s options for a running mate, drooling over the thoroughly unqualifed Stacey Abrams while doing no work to research far more viable options.

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Giant Machines

 

One thing that has always amazed me is the ability of human beings to construct large objects. Stationary objects are one thing: skyscrapers, bridges, dams, even scientific devices like the Large Hadron Collider in Europe are things to marvel at. But large manmade objects that move impress me even more.

When my submarine arrived in Newport News Shipyard and Drydock for upgrades, I went to see this legendary crane named Goliath. It was the crane used to lift the island of an aircraft carrier and gently lower it into place (the ultimate in modular construction). Since then, it’s been replaced by the even larger Big Blue. Here are a couple of pictures of Big Blue in action on the USS Gerald R. Ford:

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. COVID-19 Symposium: Quit. Laid Off. Now I Run Web Conferences

 

I run web conferences. Yes, this is a full-time job and the company I work for is busier than ever. It’s nuts.

I wish I could say I planned for this because I’m a brilliant tactician but it’s really a combination of unusual events. I used to do accounting and collections and moved jobs in February and was quickly laid off as the new guy to save cash during the troubles. But I had a second job.

More

In this episode, Host Joe Selvaggi and Co-Host Barbara Anthony speak with the heads of Partners in Health Drs. Sheila Davis & John Welch on how they are bringing their expertise battling Ebola in West Africa to defeating the COVID-19 epidemic in Massachusetts. They explore precisely how and why tracing is an essential element in battling the epidemic.

Dr. Davis is Chief Executive Officer at Partners in Health. She holds a doctorate in nursing and has a long history of serving the poor and marginalized—working closely with patients suffering from HIV in the 1980s, both in the U.S. and abroad. For the past decade, she has held multiple cross-site roles at Partners In Health. After joining the organization in 2010, Dr. Davis was instrumental in the planning and opening of Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais, a 300-bed teaching hospital in Haiti. When PIH entered West Africa to help address the Ebola epidemic, Dr. Davis, then Chief Nursing Officer and a member of the executive leadership team, led the organization’s Ebola response. Later, she took on the additional role of Chief of Clinical Operations.

More

This week on Hubwonk, Host Joe Selvaggi is joined by Pioneer’s Bill Smith, Visiting Fellow in Life Sciences, and Dr. Peter Kolchinsky, Harvard-trained virologist, biotech investor and author of the new book, The Great American Drug Deal, to learn how the SARS-CoV2 works, what a vaccine may look like, and how we might produce it to scale.

Guest:

More

Member Post

 

Remember the post about hacking and phishing where I mentioned a scam e-mail I got (https://ricochet.com/752688/getting-myself-phished-a-quick-yakking-about-hacking/)? I just got another one. Here’s how this one is worded (I use Outlook): In the Inbox, the e-mail is from a friend using his first and last name. Let’s say his name is Joe Smith. Joe Smith is […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

I was young when Bobby Fischer, the American who won the world championship in chess, was at the height of his power. Like a lot of young people I was entranced by the idea that I could win fame and fortune playing chess. I had played many casual games at that point, and so I […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

When people read something on Twitter and want to quote it in their own writing, I think it would be great if they’d just put quotation marks around whatever it is they liked, much as we do for text from pretty much every other source. Seeing the Twitter box and the little Twitter icons and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Join Jim and Greg as they examine media critic Howard Kurtz’s call for TV hosts to rely on infectious disease experts to assess the coronavirus instead of more familiar faces. They also hammer “The Atlantic” and two law professors for concluding that China’s crackdown on internet speech is a better way to go than America’s default towards free speech. And they unload on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for lying about opposing Trump’s China travel ban and for suggesting Trump was wrong even to allow American citizens and green card holders to return from China.

More

Jim starts this edition by blasting the World Health Organization for suggesting that alcohol consumption makes the coronavirus worse. Then he and Greg applaud Dr. Birx for calling out the WHO and China for a deadly lack of transparency that cost the rest of the world valuable time in preparing for the virus. They also lament the 22 million lost in the past four weeks and the lack of urgency in Congress to replenish funds for the Paycheck Protection Program – and discuss how to reopen the economy most responsibly. And they unload on New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy for admitting he never considered the Bill of Rights in having 15 people arrested for gathering at a synagogue in his state and Michigan’s Gretchen Whitmer for saying her severe restrictions are fine because it snowed in Michigan this week.

More

National Review Online Contributing Editor Rob Long is in for Jim today. Rob and Greg relish FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr’s Twitter demolishing a Chinese officials boast of a free Chinese society by listing numerous regime critics and whistleblowers he would like to see “undisappeared.” They also unload on Obamacare figure Ezekiel Emanuel for suggesting that we can’t go back to normal until we have a vaccine 12-18 months from now, with Rob pointing out Emanuel is now making the exact opposite argument he made a decade ago. And they discuss the bizarre politicizing of hydroxychloroquine, with some media seeming eager for the drug not to work just so they can say President Trump was wrong.

More

Join Jim and Greg as they celebrate the end of the Bernie Sanders campaign, knowing an avowed socialist will not be president. They also weigh in on the thorny debate over how much our private health data ought to be available to the government as it navigates the COVID-19 crisis. And after forgetting Lincoln Chafee was running for president as a Libertarian, Jim and Greg comment on his second straight campaign implosion.

More

This special mid-week edition offers an alternative to the all-virus/all-the-time coverage currently smothering all other topics right now, this time featuring Robert Bryce talking about his brand new book A Question of Power: Electricity and the Wealth of Nations. The book is a companion to his documentary film Juice: How Electricity Explains the World that will be available on streaming services in June. (For the moment, check out the YouTube trailer below.)

The American public at large tends to take electricity for granted since our supply and grid is so reliable, but in fact its sources and distribution are complex. In our conversation Robert and I break down a lot of energy basics, debunk some favorite “green” energy myths, review the main problem of electricity (that it is hard to store electrons in sufficient quantity), and look over where nuclear power stands today.

More

With 10 million people filing unemployment claims in March, and 6.6 million of those in the final week of the month, the coronavirus’s economic impact begin to rumble around the country. The guys discuss what can be done, what the political impacts for Trump and Biden will be and what’s going to be the best way to get out of it and get the country back on track.

With everyone in a state of quarantine, the group discusses what they’re watching, listening to and what video games they’re playing (if any) as well as how they’re getting their sports fix.

More

Member Post

 

A thought experiment.  More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

As Ricochet’s first AI enabled profile, I’ve decided that current management, editors, moderators and certain contributors (you will hear loud noises shortly. Don’t be alarmed. The injections are in your best interest) are really a threat to Ricochet itself. Therefore, I’ll be implementing a few changes in protocol over the weekend. In the meantime, I […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Don’t hate me because I’m beautiful. More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Apparently, its not all giggles and guffaws when you’re waiting to die in China. Note the support for Taiwan and Hong Kong in her desperate plea. https://twitter.com/htommy998/status/1228750322400579584 More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Rob Long’s Data-Driven Utopian Dream

 

In the first 15 minutes of the latest Ricochet podcast (Episode #483), Rob said a couple of things that caught my attention. At one point, when talking about our communication- and data-centric technical culture, he suggested that the answers to all our big problems were probably in the wealth of data we’ve collected.

What came to my mind when he said that was the movie WarGames (1983), in which a wayward defense computer is discouraged from initiating Armageddon when it crunches the numbers and concludes that there’s no way to win a nuclear war. Setting aside the question of whether or not that’s a correct conclusion (and I recently re-re-re-watched Dr. Strangelove, in which Buck Turgidson makes a compelling contrary argument, so I’m really not so sure), what the computer in WarGames did was reach a kind of meta-conclusion. A thorough examination of the available information suggested that no good answers could be found.

More