Movie Review: See How They Run

 

[I’m new here, so just to let you know, my reviews do not repeat the story of the film, and they are spoiler free with occasional warnings.]

It’s not every day you get a real farce on the big screen. Lots of films have elements of farce and are quite enjoyable as a consequence. In the last year, I would say “The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent” and “Free Guy” are two examples of action films that have farcical moments in them. Most Wes Anderson films also feature the concept of a light, humorous play in which the plot depends upon a skillfully exploited situation rather than upon the development of character. “See How They Run” has the advantage of actually being a film about a play, which is eventually revealed to be a sort of play in itself. That is what makes it a true farce as far as I am concerned.

The story concerns a murder that takes place during a negotiation to turn “The Mousetrap” into a movie. Those of you not familiar with the play simply need to know that it is an Agatha Christie murder mystery. It is also the longest-running play in the history of theater, starting in 1952 and still playing on the West End in London to this day. This movie is not a filmed version of the play, but rather a take off on the plot, using “The Mousetrap” as a sort of touchstone or spine for the mayhem. It mocks the machinations of old Hollywood and the manner in which filmmakers try to take material and rework it to their own vision. The real clause in the contract granting rights to a cinematic version states that such a film cannot be made until six months after the play closes in London. See how this is going to work?

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome evidence that Americans are very focused on the border crisis and crime after widespread coverage of GOP governors sending migrants from our overwhelmed border to self-proclaimed sanctuary cities. They also call out the immense media hypocrisy as the national outlets largely ignore a man fatally running over a teenager in North Dakota because he was allegedly part of an “extremist” group. And they rip Stacey Abrams for insisting that there is no fetal heartbeat after six weeks of pregnancy and that ultrasounds are tools used by men for control women’s bodies.

Our guest on this episode is Harrison Rogers, a serial entrepreneur and investor who is passionate about turning ideas into lucrative ventures. Rogers found another passion after having turned around a few distressed companies and returning them to very healthy and profitable positions. Moving forward Harrison is just as excited and passionate about investing in and helping distressed companies as he is investing in and starting new ventures.

This podcast is brought to you by America’s Future. We offer rising generations opportunities for networking, mentoring, leadership and community engagement through our national network and extensive array of programming.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the House GOP decision to put an agenda before the voters this year on the biggest issues where the Democrats have failed. They also discuss a former vice president from the EcoHealth Alliance stating under oath that COVID was a result of gain of function research in Wuhan funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. And they wince as Vladimir Putin orders 300,000 reservists to fight against Ukraine, while noting that these new soldiers are probably far less competent than the ones that have already failed.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Niall Ferguson, the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a senior faculty fellow of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard. He is the author of 16 books, including Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe. Dr. Ferguson comments publicly for the first time on the recent passing of Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-reigning British monarch, and how we should teach about Britain’s wide impact – positive and negative – on the world in her era and over the last several hundred years, from the Magna Carta to Winston Churchill. Dr. Ferguson shares findings from his most recent book, which charts the history of disasters, from the 1346–1353 Black Death to COVID; whether our handling of these catastrophes – from both public health and economic standpoints – has improved; and how we can learn from mistakes to better prepare for the future. He describes the kind of education he imparts to his own children to help ensure they have the wisdom and resilience to live in a turbulent world. The interview concludes with Dr. Ferguson reading from his latest book.

Stories of the Week: Are schools of education helping future teachers develop content expertise, or are they too focused on pedagogy and ideology? In Philadelphia, the Martin Luther King High School is the city’s first school with Black faculty for all core freshmen subjects, a step forward in the effort to ensure students can benefit from diverse role models.

Quote of the Day: Tapping into Our Own Wisdom

 

Surely, this Instruction which I enjoin upon you this day is not too baffling for you, nor is it beyond reach. It is not in the heavens, that you should say, “Who among us can go up to the heavens and get it for us and impart it to us, that we may observe it?” Neither is it beyond the sea, that you should say, “Who among us can cross to the other side of the sea and get it for us and impart it to us, that we may observe it?” No, the thing is very close to you, in your mouth and in your heart, to observe it.
— Moses, Deut. 30, 11-14

When I first read this Bible portion, I was deeply moved and encouraged. Even a novice like me, who was still getting her feet wet in the Jewish tradition, could count on exploring and understanding the Bible. A book that had always seemed unapproachable and difficult to parse was intended to be accessible! I didn’t have to be an observant Jew (although what I do observe helps me), a Hebrew or Biblical scholar. I simply had to be willing to dive deep with my Torah study friends to see what G-d wanted to teach me and desired for me to know. Grasping that truth has been very gratifying.

But in addition to realizing how I could pursue understanding the Torah, I realized that, in truth, it was a guideline for living my life, not just in a general sense, but in every moment of my life. And I don’t mean just applying the laws of Torah to my concerns and decisions, but to believe that life, in the best sense of the word, offers me the opportunity to learn and grow in so many ways.

Photo: Stella O’Malley

In this episode of Take Back Our Schools, Beth and Andrew welcome psychotherapist and author Stella O’Malley to talk about the exploding number of teenage girls with gender dysphoria. Stella shares her own difficult childhood experiences growing up thinking she should be a boy and describes her journey to a career in psychotherapy. She talks about why she thinks girls are susceptible to social contagion and the role that both schools and social media play. Stella also illustrates why so few psychologists are willing to speak out on the alarming trends of gender dysphoria affecting girls and young women but shares her own optimism that the truth will eventually win out.

Six Days in Oregon, “Let’er Buck”

 

My wife and I have spent the last six days on the east side of the Cascades. We made the 235-mile trip from our home on the west side of the Cascades to get together with my university mates. We have known each other for about 50 years. We all know each other’s children, their spouses, and all the grandchildren as well.

Driving through the Columbia River Gorge and then across the rolling hills of Oregon wheat country is a great beginning for time together that included two days at the Pendleton Round-Up. The Round-Up has been celebrated for 112 years in Pendleton. A one-week party that features individuals who know how to sit a horse and a look at a different way of life in what some call flyover country.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three bad martinis they impact the midterm elections and our energy bills. First, they fume over voters being told to lower their expectations for knowing a lot of Senate results on election night due to the large number of mail-in ballots. They also cringe as more projections suggest Americans are going to be seeing substantially higher gas and electric bills this winter. Finally, they discuss Iowa Democratic Senate hopeful Mike Franken being accused of sexual assault by his former campaign manager.

Member Post

 

I know that suffering through speeches by the current occupant of the government residence on Pennsylvania Ave. can be a chore.  Here’s a fun way to endure these harangues without grinding your teeth or shooting yourself.  Grab your card, listen up, and you’ll be shouting “BINGO!” in no time.  Think how much money you’ll save […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Dominic Pino, Thomas L. Rhodes Fellow at the National Review Institute, about his research and writing on the recently averted rail strike, including how the rail industry is organized, what labor’s demands were, and how the prospect of a nationwide rail strike exposed vulnerabilities within the American economy.

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss a recent New York Times poll showing 70 percent of Americans opposed to elementary school students being instructed about sexual orientation and gender identity. The country is clear on this and Republicans would be insane not to highlight the chasm between the parties. They also enjoy a new poll in Texas showing Gov. Greg Abbott nine points ahead of Beto O’Rourke in the governor’s race and it gives Jim a chance to tell the media that their dream of the Democrats winning statewide in Texas will likely have to wait…again. And they dissect President Biden’s “60 Minutes” interview, in which he’s frustrated that people aren’t happy that inflation has plateaued somewhat in recent months and completely bungles his Taiwan policy again.