Join Jim and Greg as they have a good time speculating about what caused the “leaks” in the Nordstream and Nordstream 2 pipelines and what it means for the war in Ukraine and for Europe’s energy supply this winter. They also roll their eyes as Sen. Amy Klobuchar suggests passing the Inflation Reduction Act will stop hurricanes in the future and the media seems eager to paint Gov. Ron DeSantis as a failure no matter what happens with Hurricane Ian. Finally, they discuss White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre calling for a “conversation” about whether the Atlanta Braves ought to change their name.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Pacific Legal Foundation Senior Fellow Alison Somin about the Biden Administration’s proposed modifications to Title IX fair treatment guidelines, challenging principles of free speech and due process, and potentially chilling the culture of free debate in American universities.

Guest:

How did Britain become a global superpower? Historian and classicist Ian Morris thinks geography has a lot to do with it. Prof. Morris discusses his latest book, Geography is Destiny: Britain and the World: A 10,000 Year History, which traces the long history of Britain’s complex relationship with the European continent. He draws surprising parallels between characters ranging from the Roman Britons and Nigel Farage, to the Papacy and the European Union.

Prof. Ian Morris is the Jean and Rebecca Willard Professor of Classics and Professor in History at Stanford University, as well as the author of the critically acclaimed Why the West Rules—for Now. His latest book, Geography is Destiny, may be purchased here.

Member Post

 

As Sarah Hoyt will tell you, the commercial publishing industry is in a sorry state. Any author not already well established would be better off with independent or self-publishing, and the availability of e-books and online sales make this more possible than ever. As fond as I am of genre fiction, and fantasy in particular, […]

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‘Same-Sex Couple’ Does Not Equal ‘Two-Sex Couple’

 

Same-sex “marriage” is in discussion again, as the US Senate seems intent on forcing the issue further down the throats of resistant Americans. There are multiple arguments for why same-sex couples do not qualify for “marriage.” My primary argument is that same-sex couples cannot produce children.

Marriage is socially and legally recognized for couples of two sexes because such a couple may, even is likely to, create new life, i.e., produce children. Those children blend the two families from which the couple came into a new branch on the tree of humanity and perpetuate that blend far into the future. Throughout history and across cultures, it has been and is the expectation of children that drives marriage. “Romance” or “erotic love” are very late additions to the long and broad history of marriage, and not particularly central to why marriage exists.

Constitutional Amendment Film Fest

 

If one should have a movie theater in the District of Columbia, why wouldn’t you have a Film Festival to salute each of the Amendments to the United States Constitution?

I guess one reason why you wouldn’t is that you might lose money on the run, but other than that…

I have slated a film for each amendment of the constitution and admit some picks are better than others. Feel free to suggest substitutes. Who knows? Various amendments might be the subject of Movie Fight Clubs someday. But for now, here’s what I got…

Join Jim and Greg as they eagerly welcome a poll showing Republicans with a 21-point advantage in competitive House districts. They also shudder as more signs emerge of a worsening economy from – from energy to housing to hiring. And they discuss the left and the media branding incoming Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni as a fascist. But since the left now tars anyone who disagrees with them as “fascist,” the word has lost much of it’s meaning.

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Take your pick as to reasons why, but assume a small scale apocalypse has happened. While we haven’t been bombed back to the stone age, the global supply chain isn’t just disrupted, it’s gone. In particular the internet is down. You can’t get anything produced outside of your own state(*). You wake up the morning […]

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Alo-ha!

 

Yes, Southwest Airlines may have pursued this adventure of giving their passengers free ukuleles and the instrument covers for the publicity it would garner. Guitar Center provided the ukuleles and a free lesson, too. And yes, there were people annoyed with the disturbance of their precious time on the jet.

But in a world where people take themselves far too seriously and have lost their ability to be playful, I think it was just the right strategy.

A New Look at Colditz

 

Colditz was a World War II prisoner-of-war camp run by Germany. It was the place incorrigible escapers and special political prisoners were sent. It is one of the best-known German POW camps, thanks to one escapee, P. R. Reid. Postwar, he wrote a book about his exploits, giving birth to a genre of escape literature about Colditz castle.

“Prisoners of the Castle: An Epic Story of Survival and Escape from Colditz, the Nazis’ Fortress Prison,” by Ben MacIntyre is the latest edition to the canon. MacIntyre takes a fresh look at the castle adding new research to previously published sources. Can anything be added to the story? The answer is yes.

Time has distanced us from the events at Colditz during World War II. The participants are all dead. The Iron Curtain, which separated those writing about the story from where the story took place, has fallen, allowing free Western access to Colditz castle. MacIntyre takes advantage of all of this to provide an unparalleled look at what happened.

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From the 1975 album “Melissa” by Melissa Manchester. Co-writtten by Manchester and Carole Bayer-Sager, this is the song that put Melissa Manchester on the map.  I don’t really have any other remarks, other than to say I have loved this song since I was a kid. Preview Open

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Last week’s chapter ended in a tie, with Have Space Suit – Will Travel just drifting past Animal Farm on the tie-breaker.[1] So, this week we ask: What is one of your favourite light-hearted stories, and why? (Please try to explain what you like about it and why other people might want to read it […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they marvel at Israel selling an air defense system to the UAE, demonstrating the success of the Abraham Accords and best chance at stability in the Middle East. They also cringe as Russian soldiers are going house to house in eastern Ukrainian provinces, forcing them to vote in favor of leaving Ukraine and joining Russia.  And that’s on top of Vladimir Putin threatening more directly than ever that he might use nukes. Finally, they call out the “gender-inclusive” insanity at the Air Force Academy, where cadets are encouraged to stop using words like mom, dad, boyfriend, and girlfriend.

Member Post

 

Except only in a very archaic sense, this is not what Páginas afluentes translates as but I always liked seeing it on Portuguese Wikipedia. It means “What links here” or it did. It’s gone now. The feature is likewise gone from Turkish Wikipedia, although still on Slovene and Spanish Wikipedias. I’m rather annoyed by this. […]

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