Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Resisting Terrorists While Suspected of Being Part of Them

 

Sean Danker wrote the novel “Admiral” in 2016, a tale of four castaways who have to cross a hostile planet to survive. Three are fresh out of their service academies traveling to their first service assignment. The fourth is the Admiral – an individual unlike any admiral the three newbies have ever met. That was five novels ago. The series was dropped by Penguin, the original publisher. Danker is continuing it independently.

“Snowblind,” by Sean Danker is the sixth novel in the Evagardian universe, the setting in which the events of “Admiral” took place. It reunites the three graduates from the first novel: Deilani, the medical officer, Nils, the communications and computer wizard, and Salmagard, the negotiator. This time they face even greater than the last time they were thrown together.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Two Sisters Finally Get Adulting

 

Jen Nilsson has it all, a great condo in California, a fast-track job in a Silicon Valley start-up, and a seemingly limitless future. Life is good and bound to get better. Then her sister Katie, ten years younger, and just out of college, calls and asks if she can move in with her big sister. Katie can no longer stand living with their parents.

“If You Can Get It,” a novel by Brendan Hodge opens with this. Jen wants to say no, but Katie is not calling from their parents’ home near Chicago. She is right outside Jen’s California condo. Jobless Katie lacks the money to drive home. Jen is stuck. She has to say yes.

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Some of the notes of P.I. MushroomAlgae in regards to the Case of the Cult of Cats. August 1st, 2020I always had a weird feeling about the cold case of the missing man with the odd story about the cats. However, I knew for the longest time that this story of the cats must have […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

‘The actual beginning, though it is not really the beginning, but the actual flashpoint, was – I remember very clearly – I can even, I can still see the corner in my house in 20 Northmoor Road where it happened: I’d got an enormous pile of exam papers there, and marking school examinations in the […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Unknown Transcription Found Earlier This Year

 

An unknown transcription found earlier this year without a year or transcriber. It was left as a note at one P.I. MushroomAlgae’s home. It reads:

To whoever gets this message. My mind is going and I can hardly make out what is what, so while I have time I must inscribe this before I can’t remember it correctly or the worst is to happen to me…

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Brenda Wineapple, author of the award-winning Hawthorne: A Life and The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation. They discuss her definitive biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne and the 170th anniversary of the publication of his classic novel, The Scarlet Letter. They explore how Hawthorne’s writing was shaped by the author’s Salem, Massachusetts setting and his notorious Puritan ancestor, who had been involved in the Witchcraft Trials. Brenda describes why Hester Prynne, the protagonist of The Scarlet Letter, is such a compelling heroine, and why students today should read Hawthorne’s work. The discussion then turns to Brenda’s most recent book, The Impeachers, and the impulse to condemn or publicly shame. President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial was the first against any U.S. chief executive. Brenda talks about how it influenced Americans’ view of their chief executives, accountability, and whether we are likely to see increased attempts to remove presidents from office. The episode concludes with Brenda doing a reading from The Impeachers.

Stories of the Week: In New Hampshire, the state Supreme Court is hearing a case challenging the adequacy of the state’s school funding formula, contending that local taxpayers are being unfairly required to cover a disproportionate amount of school budgets. In South Carolina, the pandemic has led to a substantial increase in enrollment in virtual charter schools.

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By giving yourself to Ustina, you are, I know, exhausting your body, but disowning your body is only half of it. As it happens, my friend, that can lead to pride.What else can I do? thought Arseny.Do more, Foma whispered right into Arseny’s ear. Disown your identity. You have already taken the first step by […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Language of Orthanc

 

After the Battle of Helm’s Deep and the Ents’ breaking of Isengard, Gandalf and his allies gather at the foot of Orthanc, the last redoubt of the traitorous wizard Saruman. Gandalf warns the company of the power of Saruman’s voice. Those who hear it are easily swayed to his side, even if they do not remember his words. Indeed, the horsemen of Rohan quickly find themselves drawn to the foe whose schemes killed so many of their kinsmen. The honeyed voice of the rainbow-clothed sage in his high tower begins to trap the common warriors who, though skilled in battle, are unprepared for the combat of beguiling sophistry. But then:

It was Gimli the dwarf who broken in suddenly, ‘The words of this wizard stand on their heads,’ he growled, gripping the handle of his axe. ‘In the language of Orthanc help means ruin, and saving means slaying, that is plain. But we do not come here to beg.’

We are joined by Dr. Jung Chang, author of the best-selling books Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China; Mao: The Unknown Story; and Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister: Three Women at the Heart of Twentieth-Century China. Dr. Chang discusses Wild Swans, a sweeping narrative about three generations of her family across 20th-century China, and the importance of transmitting firsthand historical knowledge of life under Mao Zedong. She also describes her definitive biography of Mao – which, like Wild Swans, remains banned in China – documenting the carnage under his reign, including the peacetime deaths of an estimated 70 million people. She explores Mao’s cult of personality, changing perceptions of his character and legacy, and Maoism’s resurgence in China today. Dr. Chang then delves into the topic of her newest book, Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister: Three Women at the Heart of Twentieth-Century China, a group biography of the powerful Soong sisters, including Madame Chiang. She concludes with a reading from her memoir, Wild Swans.

Stories of the Week: A new report covered by Time magazine reveals a shocking lack of Holocaust knowledge among Millennials and Gen-Z Americans surveyed across 50 states – troubling evidence of the dangers of woefully inadequate history instruction. CBS News reports that more Black families, when given the option, are likely to choose remote learning, for a variety of reasons having to do with mistrust of the system and safety concerns.

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Decades ago I read the only two books I ever read in Spanish. One was Mario Vargas Llosa’s La Guerra del Fin del Mundo. The other was something titled Memorias de Misia Kathy. I have neither close to hand, and even if I did I doubt that I’d find delicious quotes. But since the era […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. This Week’s Book Review: Stellaris

 

The Tennessee Valley Interstellar Workshop are a group who believe man can and must go to the stars. In 2016 the TVIW held a track on Homo Stellaris. Its task was to describe the foundations of a space-based society.

“Stellaris: People of the Stars,” edited by Les Johnson and Robert E. Hampson, is one of the fruits of that year’s workshop. It is a collection of non-fiction essays and science fiction stories about what it takes for humans to travel and live outside the Solar System.

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Every year I return to Wislawa Szymborska’s 9.11 poem; from a photograph, the poem is precise as a photo, not an excess line, not a wasted word: her humane heart’s response to the atrocity freezes in place its pitiless horror. I believe I may have posted “Photograph from September 11” before. The other poem is […]

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Note: About two years ago I posted a couple of draft pieces from a novel I’m working on called Charis Colony. Here is another from the finished product which I am now editing. After Shirin Seethi returned the recording spools, data slides and equipment to the Wildlife Biology Division offices in the Sciences Ministry Building […]

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During this morning’s reading, I came upon the phrase, ‘all of a sudden.’ Perhaps because I had the time to ponder such things, it began to occur to me that ‘all of a sudden’ is a strange expression. Where did it come from? What is ‘a sudden’? Preview Open

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Another important development with long-term implications for the lives of the Aschlimann family from that year is that 79 was the year that my brother Tim started to get seriously dedicated to playing guitar. This turn of events had an auspicious-enough beginning: Dad had bought him a guitar, a Yamaha steel string country-style guitar with […]

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This will contain some generic spoilers. I won’t give away anything specific other than the basic premise of the novel, which is revealed within the first few chapters anyways. It is impressive, in its own way, for a work of fiction to plagiarize another while being less insightful and less interesting than the original. Second […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A New Addition to the “Black Tide Rising” Canon

 

John Ringo’s “Black Tide Rising” series posits a zombie apocalypse caused by a highly-contagious, genetically-engineered viral plague that destroys the upper brain functions and turns its victims into mindless cannibals. Ringo has since invited other authors to come and play in the highly-popular “Black Tide Rising” sandbox.

“At the End of the World,” by Charles E. Gannon is the latest entry in the “Black Tide Rising” series. It follows nine teens on a summer senior year learning cruise when the plague breaks out. Told through the journal of Alvaro Casillas, one of the teens on the cruise, it follows their course through a nightmare world aboard Crosscurrent Voyager.