Jim and guest host Chad Benson cheer on the New York Times as they publish a new op-ed detailing the evidence for the lab leak theory in a fair way. They also try to understand why the GOP is willing to make a lose-lose compromise with Senate Democrats on infrastructure spending. Lastly, they marvel at another New York Times op-ed by X-Files creator Chris Carter in which he states why he is skeptical of the Pentagon UFO report.

Jim & Greg are glad to see VP Kamala Harris finally deciding to visit the border amid mounting pressure from Donald Trump, conservatives, and some in the media. They also cringe at President Biden’s dishonest attempts to justify gun control and saying that anyone wanting to resist the government would need F-15s and nukes. Finally, they discuss China covering up their climate abuses by paying off American media outlets and nonprofits.

Jim and Greg applaud Senate Republicans for standing strong and voting against the partisan election reform bill offered by Democrats. They also blast China for forcing the last remaining pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong to close its doors. Finally, they sigh at the news that it will take at least a week or longer to find out who won the Democratic primary for mayor of New York City.

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The 1860 Project

 

You may have heard of the thing called The 1619 Project, a series of essays shilled by the New York Times, and loved by woke progressives, that purports to demonstrate that America is a country built on and inextricably bound to slavery. It argues that racism infuses every aspect of our culture, is the unifying ideological foundation of our nation and should be seen as the beating heart and evil soul of America.

It’s widely regarded by real historians as tripe, as faulty and incompetent history, shot through with error and toxic reimagining of the past. I share that view.

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema for staying consistent on her refusal to kill the filibuster, much to the dismay of her party. They also wince as the Taliban  regains control in much of Northern Afghanistan amid the withdrawal of American troops. They end their discussion by highlighting the voter ID flip-flopping of Georgia Sen. Raphael Warnock and other Democrats after years of calling the idea racist and tool for voter suppression.

 

Jim and Greg investigate a recent report of a high-level Chinese defector who allegedly has “damaging information” on many American intelligence and government officials. They also remark on Senator Whitehouse’s continued membership in an all-white beach club in Rhode Island. Lastly, they lament that Democrats are calling a tragic car accident at a gay parade in Florida a “terrorist attack.”

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“I can’t in good conscience allow the U.S. government to destroy privacy, Internet freedom, and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they’re secretly building… the NSA specifically targets the communications of everyone. It ingests them by default… they are intent on making every conversation and every form of behavior […]

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Greg and guest host Chad Benson appreciate New York City mayoral candidate Andrew Yang being the only one to admit that mentally ill people committing violent acts are a problem for the city and that residents have the right to not be assaulted. They also cringe as Iran prepares to install a new president who is already under U.S. sanctions for leading the mass execution of political prisoners in the 1980s. And they react to Sen. Ted Cruz saying that he hopes actor Matthew McConnaughey does not run for governor in Texas because he would be a very formidable candidate.

 

Member Post

 

The United States militia is enshrined in the Second Amendment of the Constitution. And while the militia movement of today is widely known, its history – and the history of independent Constitutional militias stretching back to the dawn of the republic – is far less well known. Why does this matter nowadays? Because understanding the […]

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Member Post

 

Of course you’ve heard the name “George Soros,” often invoked as a sort of folk demon on the American and international right, it’s likely that you have some vague notion of why you think he’s a bad guy, or maybe you think the whole thing is a bunch of hype. However, if you’re a freedom […]

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Magna Carta Day: The Forgotten History of Magna Carta Day and What It Commemorates

 

June 15th is Magna Carta Day. While this doesn’t have the same cachet as Memorial Day or the Fourth of July, the history of the Magna Carta is arguably far more important. A number of the rights codified in the Constitution’s Bill of Rights find their origins in the Magna Carta. The charter was drafted by the Archbishop of Canterbury as a way to settle tensions between the King of England and some of his barons.

The Magna Carta is the foundation of the Western conception of individual liberties, particularly in the Anglosphere. It is also one of the most mythologized documents in history. Still, many today are unaware of its actual content and the historical context in which it was drafted.

The Origins of the Magna Carta

While much of the historical context is complex, the main point is this: Under the rule of King John in the 13th century, several barons were unhappy with the nebulous nature of rule and administration. The Magna Carta was an attempt to codify the procedures by which the King ruled over his subjects, in particular the barons. The “Great Charter” was renewed by subsequent kings, though under parliamentary rule, much of its main provisions were slowly stripped away.

My Grandfather and the Fort Snelling Bridge

 

This is one of many stories told by my dad many years after his father passed away in the mid-’60s. I was in 3rd grade when he died, so my memories of him are that of a child.  This is a story that I have been unable to confirm but which I am confident my dad believed was true.  You be the judge.  I have tried to fill in some historical details.  It’s a fun story.

Fort Snelling Bridge (MN5) 1909

Greg and guest host Rob Long celebrate a federal court in Louisiana ending President Biden’s oil and gas lease ban on federal land. They also cringe as the Biden administration considers lifting sanctions on top Iranian institutions which finance terrorism. Lastly, they roll their eyes at California Gov. Gavin Newsom for failing to relinquish his state of emergency powers despite COVID-19 numbers being at all time lows in his state.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and guest co-host Kerry McDonald talk with Paul Reid, co-author, with William Manchester, of the New York Times best-selling biography of Winston Churchill, The Last Lion: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965.

Reid shares how he was enlisted to complete William Manchester’s biographical trilogy on the greatest political figure of the 20th century, which became a best-seller. They discuss Churchill’s remarkable foresight about the dangers of Nazi Germany in the 1930s, his courageous World War II leadership, and what students should know about his central role in the Allies’ defeat of Hitler, as well as big-picture lessons on statesmanship during times of crisis. They review the significance of Churchill’s famous “Iron Curtain” speech, delivered in Missouri 75 years ago, a seminal Cold War event warning about communist totalitarianism. Reid offers insights on Churchill’s liberal arts education and grounding in classical history, which informed his actions as well as his 43 book-length works and extraordinary speeches. He also sheds light on the more private side of this great figure, who was an ambitious, driven workaholic, yet also charismatic, playful, and artistic. The interview concludes with a reading from Reid’s Churchill biography.

Member Post

 

Flag Day was once called the “runty stepchild among American national holidays” by the New York Times. While it may not be the grandest of our country’s celebrations, it’s impossible to talk about Flag Day without briefly discussing why Old Glory was originally created, and what it means today. We may know the flag as a […]

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Greg and guest host Rob Long discuss CNN calling VP Kamala Harris “cringeworthy” for her terrible answers on when she will visit the border, a possible nuclear disaster unfolding in China, and a New York Times article claiming Tom Hanks is “not racist” but must be “anti-racist.”

A Famous German Scientist and His British Fans

 

Albert Einstein was one of the twentieth century’s great men, vying with Winston Churchill for the title of “Man of the Century.” In addition to relativity, he was an accomplished musician and a noted pacifist. He was an Anglophile. He was also an assassin’s target in the 1930s.

“Einstein on the Run: How Britain Saved the World’s Greatest Scientist,” by Andrew Robinson tells two tales. It explores the admiration Einstein and Great Britain mutually shared. It shows how the British offered Einstein sanctuary at the scientist’s moment of greatest peril.

The book is also a biography of Einstein, but it is a focused biography. It recounts his life in the context of his relation with Britain. It shows how British physicists, most notably Sir Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell, shaped Einstein’s scientific studies, and fostered an admiration for British scientists.

Jim and Greg discuss Rep. Rashida Tlaib’s comments attacking fellow Democrats for condemning fellow “Squad” member Ilhan Omar, another interview where Vice President Kamala Harris badly dodges questions on visiting the border, and the unwelcome return of CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin.

Member Post

 

That has not happened, yet. The first testable act in the Latin American Studies course I am taking is a map quiz. I consider it time well spent, learning the capital of Guerrero is Chilpancingo. All the years my eyes just skated over that. ¡Nunca jamás! The second testable act is a two-page paper on […]

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