Join Greg and Rob Long as they welcome a bipartisan Senate effort to stop the Biden administration from scrapping Title 42, better known as the Remain in Mexico policy for illegal immigrants. They also unload on Press Secretary Jen Psaki for not knowing how much worse the border crisis will get if Title 42 goes away – and also not seeming to care. And they shake their heads as New York Gov. Kathy Hochul pushes for an end to natural gas in new buildings starting as early as 2027.

 

Join Greg and National Review’s David Harsanyi as they criticize The Atlantic’s Anne Applebaum for her weak deflection after a young college student challenges her on the media’s role in the cover-up of the Hunter Biden laptop scandal. David discusses his book, Eurotrash, and discusses why the U.S. should not look to Europe as model for economic policies here. And after a unanimous vote last week, Palm Springs, California, will pay transgender and non-binary individuals $900 dollars a month with no strings attached.

 

Join Greg and National Review’s Andy McCarthy as they react to the release of a critical new text message from the Durham probe that catches Michael Sussman in an important lie. They also scrutinize the White House’s China policy as a letter of recommendation by the president for the son of Hunter Biden’s Chinese business partner comes to light. And Andy explains how the Senate Republicans could have been far more effective in showing just how weak Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson really is on crime.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” as the nation prepares for the likely confirmation of its first Black female U.S. Supreme Court justice, Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. G. Edward White, David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, and author of the three-volume book, Law in American History. Professor White draws on his experiences clerking for Chief Justice Earl Warren to share information about Warren’s character, and how his landmark Brown v. Board of Education opinion has shaped America’s legal culture and access to education in our era. They explore Professor White’s legal history trilogy, and talk about what teachers and students today should know about the Civil War and ending slavery, from the Dred Scott decision of 1857 through the Thirteenth Amendment. They delve into the second volume, from Reconstruction, industrialization, and immigration, to the rise of Jim Crow; and the third volume on massive legal changes since World War II. The interview concludes with a reading by Professor White from his trilogy.

Stories of the WeekU.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona is fielding criticism from the left on loan forgiveness, and the right on mask mandates and hot-button curriculum issues. The Washington Post editorial board calls out the Biden administration for proposed new federal rules that will likely hamper charter schools’ growth.

Join Greg and Scot Bertram as they appreciate Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett telling Americans to “read the opinion” before getting worked up over the court’s upcoming opinions. They also analyze the effects of Colorado’s newly signed abortion bill, which allows abortions up to the moment of birth, and the hard left shift by Democrats nationally on the issue of life. And they roll their eyes as Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer vetoes legislation to clean up the voter rolls of citizens, saying it’s an undue burden on county clerks.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with constitutional scholar Ilya Shapiro about Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination hearings and what her background and responses reveal about her views on the Constitution, the role of the Supreme Court, and her likely judicial positions relative to her fellow justices.

Guest:

Join Greg and Rob Long as they’re glad to see Elon Musk becoming the largest shareholder of Twitter and they analyze how it will shake up the social media landscape. They also cover the Biden Administration’s decision to rescind the “Remain in Mexico” policy which would more than double the number of illegal immigrants entering America each month. And Vice President Kamala Harris struggles with boilerplate Democrat talking points in an interview with BET, adding to the lengthy list of verbal mishaps that have plagued her term.

Back in January, more than a month before Russia invaded Ukraine, former Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman joined the 3 Martini Lunch to explain why he thought Russia and Iran were the most immediate threats to American national security in 2022.

In addition to expecting Putin to invade at that time, Lieberman details the Iran threat and explains why China is less of an immediate danger to national security but is probably our greatest long-term problem. And he takes us inside partisan groupthink that is on full display in Washington.

Jim and Greg welcome Byron York, host of The Byron York Show podcast and chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner to preview the 2022 midterm elections. They examine the many factors suggesting this could be a big year for Republicans – from President Biden’s deep unpopularity to the many issues breaking in their favor. They also look at potential stumbling blocks for the GOP and how this year of great political potential could end up as a disappointment. And they consider what wildcards could impact this election season.

Join Jim and Chad as they celebrate the U.K. lifting its fracking ban. They also react to reports that Senator Susan Collins will support Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson, essentially ensuring Jackson a spot on the high court. And despite assurances they are pulling back from Kiev, the Russian military continues its campaign.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-host Cara Candal talks with John Lewis Gaddis, the Robert A. Lovett Professor of Military and Naval History at Yale University, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of George F. Kennan: An American Life. He shares some of the wider background knowledge, major historical themes, and key events that today’s students should know about the Cold War and its impact. He discusses the life and legacy of George F. Kennan, the subject of his Pulitzer-winning biography, who was the architect of America’s Containment policy toward Soviet communism and understood the true character of the Russian people and why communism would fail. They survey some of the outstanding political, military, literary, and religious leaders, as well as the murderous dictators, of the Cold War era. Prof. Gaddis explains why the West has often seemed less resolute towards Communist China and Putin’s Russia since the Cold War, and explores what teachers, students, and the public should know regarding Russia’s long-standing goal of dominating Ukraine. The episode concludes with a reading from Prof. Gaddis’s book, The Cold War: A New History.

Stories of the Week: In Massachusetts, education policymakers are moving ahead with a second review of the Boston Public Schools (BPS), which may lead to state receivership, after reports found that 16,000 BPS students attend schools performing in the bottom 10 percent statewide. Pioneer Institute’s Senior Fellow Charles Chieppo, most recently co-author of a RealClearPolicy op-ed on this topic, joins Cara for an in-depth discussion.

Join Jim and Chad as they analyze how China’s ‘zero-COVID’ strategy is having a tumultuous effect on it’s cities and economy. They also shake their heads at a new report that found as much as $80 billion was stolen from the Paycheck Protection Program. And in another press conference fumble, President Biden may have admitted that the U.S. is training Ukrainian troops in Poland.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Pioneer Institute’s Dr. Bill Smith about his recently released paper entitled, “340B Drug Discounts, An Increasingly Dysfunctional Federal Program,” which analyzes the evolution of a well-intentioned program to offer discounted drugs to the uninsured from a benefit that had helped charitable hospitals to one that has exploded to generate billions in profits while serving fewer uninsured.

Guest:
William S. Smith is Senior Fellow and Director of the Life Sciences Initiative at Pioneer Institute. He has 25 years of experience in government and in corporate roles, including as vice president of public affairs and policy at Pfizer, and as a consultant to major pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies. He held senior staff positions for the Republican House leadership on Capitol Hill, the White House, and in the Massachusetts Governor’s office. He earned his PhD with distinction at The Catholic University of America (CUA).

Join Jim and Greg as they react to a new NBC poll that has President Biden’s approval rating at a record low 40%. They cringe at Biden’s gaffe-stricken trip to Europe and what it means for American foreign policy. And your favorite podcast hosts share their opinions on Will Smith’s public slapping of Oscars presenter Chris Rock.

What Is a Women’s History Month?

 

Since 1987, America has recognized March as Women’s History Month. In this year’s proclamation, President Biden wrote that the event “provides an opportunity to honor the generations of trailblazing women and girls who have built our Nation, shaped our progress, and strengthened our character as a people.”

Truly a noble effort. But in 2022, nothing can be so simple. We can’t even agree what a “woman” is, let alone “history” or “month.”

The latest example occurred during the hearings for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination to the Supreme Court. Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R–Tenn.) asked the nominee, “Can you provide a definition for the word ‘woman?'”

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer a poll showing a majority of Democrats supporting the Florida legislation keeping controversial sexual topics away from kids in kindergarten through third grade and Gov. Ron DeSantis sporting a healthy lead over the Dems running against him. They also sigh as President Biden says sanctions were never going to deter Russia despite top administration officials saying exactly the opposite for weeks. And Jim dissects China’s new COVID problem as cases are on the rise there.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they react to encouraging reports of Ukrainian resistance against the Russian military, including the sinking of the Russian landing ship called “Orsk”. They breathe a sigh of relief as Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer confirms fellow Justice Clarence Thomas is OK and recovering from an infection. And a $700 million dollar yacht allegedly belonging to Vladimir Putin is sitting empty off the coast of Tuscany as the Russian crew working on it suddenly abandoned the vessel.

Join Jim and Greg as they wonder if Supreme Court Nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson’s inability to define “woman” disqualifies her from the high court. They cover Fed Chairman Jerome Powell’s announcement that many more interest rate hikes are coming and that inflation may last for three more years. And Russian Climate Envoy Anatoly Chubais steps down, citing his opposition to the invasion of Ukraine.