Join Jim and Greg as they slam radical Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib for wanting to defund Customs & Border Patrol, ICE, and the entire Department of Homeland Security. They also unload on the 40 leftist groups urging President Biden to look the other way on Uighur genocide and Hong Kong repression in order to build cooperation for a climate change agenda. And they have fun with John Kerry getting caught doing what John Kerry does best – thinking the rules don’t apply to him.

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“This” is the Latin American Studies course I have been taking this summer. I have enjoyed it and learned tons, but every time I submitted a paper, I thought (1) its content is not what is desired and (2) I don’t care. Those amount to a bad attitude on my part. And as I have […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the declining approval numbers for Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and one poll even has her trailing her likely GOP opponent. They also hammer President Biden for not joining three European nations in condemning Iran’s latest nuclear actions and even trying to ease up on sanctions against Tehran. And they roll their eyes as the Biden administration plans to go door-to-door to encourage more Americans to get vaccinated.

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C-Span has a 2021 list ranking the Presidents, and Conrad Black has an entertaining article on the issue here at American Greatness.  This might present an interesting topic on a Tuesday afternoon.  Give us your own Top 10 list! Black doesn’t give numeric ranks, but has a Top 4, and another 8 that he rates […]

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Jim and Greg welcome the funny but pointed denunciation of Critical Race Theory from Lousisiana GOP Sen. John Kennedy. They also wonder why the U.S. left Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan without even telling our Afghan allies. And they roll their eyes as the Lincoln Project adds longtime Dem strategist Joe Trippi, essentially admitting it’s now nothing more than another left-wing group.

Hubwonk Host Joe Selvaggi talks with CATO research fellow and constitutional scholar Trevor Burrus about the recent Supreme Court ruling, Americans For Prosperity Foundation v. Bonta, reaffirming the right to privacy by denying the state of California the right to compel non-profits to disclose their list of donors.

Guest:
Trevor Burrus is a research fellow in the Cato Institute’s Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies and in the Center for the Study of Science, as well as editor-in-chief of the Cato Supreme Court Review. His research interests include constitutional law, civil and criminal law, legal and political philosophy, legal history, and the interface between science and public policy. His academic work has appeared in journals such as the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, the New York University Journal of Law and Liberty, the New York University Annual Survey of American Law, the Syracuse Law Review, and many others. His popular writing has appeared in the Washington Post, the New York TimesUSA TodayForbes, the Huffington Post, the New York Daily News, and others.

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Sadly, promotion of Juneteenth from rhetorical and symbolic recognition to federal workforce paid holiday prompted the usual response of most people going to their corners, blue or red. Part of the reaction from the right was to suggest that Juneteenth was meaningless, and that if any day was to be advanced (really no day was […]

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Greg is back. Join him and birthday boy Jim Geraghty as they hammer the National Education Association for wanting every student vaccinated before agreeing to face-to-face instruction. They also slam Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf for vetoing legislation that would require Voter ID and signature matching there. And they are grateful for the inspiring Independence Day message from former President Thomas Whitmore.

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When I lived in the Chicago area, from time to time I would pick up the newspaper to read that somebody had parked their car on the street, only to find out that their vehicle  was at the bottom of a sink hole the next morning. Often this weird event happened in the Downer’s Grove […]

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Calvin Coolidge is one of our favorite U.S. Presidents. He served two terms between 1923 and 1929, and was known for being soft-spoken and principled. Nicknamed “Silent Cal,” Coolidge was deeply concerned with tax reduction and the federal budget, as well as U.S. intervention abroad in the aftermath of World War I in 1919. Prior […]

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In 1914 Pancho Villa in his capacity as a Mexican state governor expelled Spaniards, and out they went. In 1939 Lázaro Cárdenas in his capacity as Mexican national president granted asylum to Spaniards, and in they came. What made this change possible? Several things, some related to the Mexican Revolution’s own evolutions, others related to […]

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Canada Haunted by Past Sins

 

Starting in 1876, with the passage of the unfortunately named “Indian Act,” the Canadian government started a system of residential schools intended to educate native children to integrate them into the larger Canadian society and economy. Management and operation of these schools were entrusted to several Church organizations. With the movement of granting tribal nations more self-governing powers, these schools began closing in the 1940s and 50s, with the last closing in the late-60s. Recently unmarked graves have been uncovered at the sites of 4 former schools and to date, a total of 1148 graves have been discovered.

So far these sites are located in:

Jim and guest host applaud SCOTUS for upholding an Arizona election law that is similar to Georgia’s election integrity laws which dooms Democrats’ hopes of overturning them. They give another round of applause to SCOTUS for protecting donor privacy, overturning a California law which forces nonprofits to disclosing donor information. Finally, they giggle at former staff members’ complaints of mistreatment from VP Harris which seem to be a little too critical.

 

When, Where, and What Did You Learn in History Class?

 

In “Conservatives can’t win the history wars,” Matt Yglesias claims that when his wife was a kid in Texas she learned about “the war of Northern Aggression.” Yglesias was born in 1981, so I will assume his wife is the same age and attended Texas public schools from roughly 1986-1998. I find it hard to believe that, even in Texas, students learned the “lost cause” version of the Civil War.

I grew up in Florida in the 70s and 80s. Maybe not the deep South, but definitely not a progressive utopia. I learned about the evils of slavery, the rapaciousness and violence of Southern slaveowners, the broken promises of Reconstruction, and the brutal unfairness of the Jim Crow era. Martin Luther King, Jr. was presented as a national hero equal to George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, a liberator who forced a recalcitrant country to finally reckon with our national sins. I did hear the phrase “War of Northern Aggression” from teachers, but tongue-in-cheek, an absurd aside to point out how backward and delusional “some people” used to be in the South.

Today Jim and guest host Chad Benson celebrate Speaker Pelosi’s further destruction of the infrastructure bill compromise. They also grimace as problems continue to appear in the Democratic mayoral primary race in NYC. Finally, they sigh as LA county health officials recommend masks for vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals in light of the new Delta strand.

 

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with David Hackett Fischer, University Professor and Earl Warren Professor of History Emeritus at Brandeis University, and the author of numerous books, including Paul Revere’s Ride and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington’s Crossing. As America prepares to celebrate the Fourth of July, they review key figures who helped secure independence from Great Britain, including Paul Revere, immortalized in Longfellow’s classic poem, and Founding Father George Washington, known among his contemporaries as the “indispensable man” of the revolutionary cause. Fischer sets the scene for the famous midnight ride, describing what students should know about colonial Boston, and why the British Empire posed such an existential threat to the colonists’ understanding of their rights and liberties as Englishmen. The conversation turns to the lessons teachers and young people today should learn about George Washington’s character, weaknesses, and military leadership during the colonists’ improbable victory against the most powerful empire in the world at that time. He also offers a preview of his forthcoming book, African Founders.

Stories of the Week: In New Jersey, the state’s Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision allowing expansion of seven Newark charter schools approved by the education commissioner, clearing the path for charters to serve thousands more students. In Massachusetts, the education commissioner is under fire from the state’s congressional delegation for proposing to temporarily freeze $400 million in Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funding earmarked for Boston Public Schools, due to concerns related to the Boston School Committee, which has experienced a string of resignations in the past year.

Jim and guest host Chad Benson celebrate the end of federal unemployment benefits in some states which is nudging unemployed Americans to return to work. They also say “I told you so” as Biden threatens to veto a bipartisan infrastructure bill if a far-left bill is not also passed using reconciliation. Lastly, the marvel at an Olympic athlete’s refusal to be reverent during the playing of the national anthem… at an event dedicated to representing your country.

The Rise of the Conquistador

 

The European discovery of the Americas and the subsequent colonization of that land by Europeans was the most consequential occurrence of the last millennia.  Two men prominent in that discovery’s opening events were Christopher Columbus and Hernando Cortés.

“Sword of Empire: The Spanish Conquest of the Americas from Columbus to Cortés, 1492-1529,” by Donald E. Chipman, tells the story of these two men. It explores the events of the first forty years of the Spanish acquisition of the American possessions.

Columbus opened the Age of Exploration. Cortés opened the Age of the Conquistador, where Spanish freebooters conquered the great empires of North and South America. Together the men form a set of bookends in the story of the Americas. Columbus departed the New World for the last time in 1504, dying in 1506. Cortés arrived at Santo Domingo, the colony founded by Columbus in the year of Columbus’s death.  This allows Chipman to follow the thread of the opening years of Spain’s American adventures using these two as his focus.

HIstory Lesson from the Anglo-Saxons

 

cover of The Anglo Saxons

I have recently acquired a copy of The Anglo Saxons – A History of the Beginnings of England 400 – 1066 by Marc Morris. A preliminary perusal brought this comment to light. It is an echo of our current state of affairs. Describing the effect of the withdrawal of Roman forces from Britain, he notes,

“The whole point of the Roman state was to guarantee peace for its citizens with a well-trained army. If that army was absent, or so inadequate that it could not prevent the violent incursions of seaborne raiders, what was the point of paying taxes, or obeying a law that forbade citizens from carrying weapons? Self-defense was synonymous with self-rule. The Britons, says [Greek historian] Zosimus ‘armed themselves and ran many risks to ensure their own safety, and freed their cities from attacking barbarians … expelling the Roman magistrates and establishing the government they wanted.’”