This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Karina Calderon, deputy director of The Lawrence Partnership, about her work to help immigrant entrepreneurs drive economic growth in Lawrence, Massachusetts. The Lawrence Partnership is a collaboration of business and civic leaders started in 2015 that helps by incubating, training, assisting, loaning, basically doing everything they and their partners can to grow the city’s businesses. The model they’ve adopted is replicable for sure, and is one based on longstanding relationships and trust between new and longtime residents. Karina explains how it works, shares some of the success stories of their immigrant small business owners, and details her own immigration story, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.  

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome what appears to be the Biden administration’s grudging admission that there won’t be a new Iran nuclear deal. They also hammer President Biden for reportedly getting ready to pander to his base through massive student loan forgiveness and explain who will really benefit. And they find the timing curious as Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey demands “algorithmic justice” after Elon Musk buys Twitter.

Join Jim and Greg as they mostly welcome Elon Musk’s purchase of Twitter and promises of speech protection and dissect why so many on the left are hysterical about this news. They also sigh as Biden climate envoy John Kerry declares war on natural gas and promises it will be dead within 10 years. And they get a kick out of Utah “independent” U.S. Senate candidate Evan McMullin’s empty vow to caucus with neither Republicans nor Democrats if he is elected this year.

 

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Matthew Hennessey, Wall Street Journal editor and author of Visible Hand, A Wealth of Notions on the Miracle of the Market, about how the principles of economics manifest themselves in our every day lives and how we can use that insight to better understand our personal and civic choices.

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome new polls showing New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan deadlocked with her possible GOP rivals after her sudden interest in border security faces a major backlash. They also shudder at a Pentagon report showing the U.S. military is dangerously dependent upon China for critical components needed to fight effectively. And they shake their heads as Sen. Elizabeth Warren tries to argue that “forgiving” student loan debt by forcing taxpayers to foot the bill will not add to inflation.

 

We Have Been There Before

 

Oh, my! Who says history is boring? Bolshies, American airmen, King Kong, cavalry champions meet, and Our Lady of Victory resonates again with a victory on the Vistula. This story takes place in the 1920s.

After WWI borders changed, maps were redrawn, and old ambitions were rekindled to retake territory lost in centuries past.

Join Jim and Greg as they review the latest predictions out of the Cook Political Report and  UVA Crystal Ball, which shifted 11 house races toward the Republicans. Many races were updated from ‘Likely R’ to ‘Safe R’, but it casts an ominous shadow over the Democrats’ chances of keeping the House in a critical midterm election. They also cringe at MSNBC host Nicole Wallace for calling Gov. Ron DeSantis’ education bill “dehumanizing” and comparing him and Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin Russian soldiers raping Ukrainian children. And despite being even older than Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is considering running for president in 2024, according to a leaked memo.

Join Jim and Greg as they congratulate the Virginia legislature and Gov. Glenn Youngkin for passing common sense, bipartisan bills that outlaw formal or informal quotas on arrests and tickets by Virginia police. They also continue to be surprised at the messaging failures of the Biden White House, often with the President himself out of the loop, with transportation masking as the latest example. And despite no obvious constituency or hope of beating Donald Trump or Governor Ron DeSantis, Illinois Rep. Adam Kinzinger floated his name as a potential candidate in the 2024 presidential race.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Robert Alter, Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, and author of the landmark three-volume book, The Hebrew Bible: A Translation with Commentary. As Jews around the world celebrate Passover this week, Dr. Alter shares why the Hebrew Bible is probably the most influential book in human history, and the larger lessons 21st century teachers and students should draw from its timeless wisdom. They also discuss the text as a record of the Jewish people, and vital historical lessons of persecution, resilience, and survival. Professor Alter describes how the Psalms and the Book of Exodus’ stories of liberation and Moses’ leadership inspired several of the major figures of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview concludes with Dr. Alter reading from his trilogy.

Stories of the Week: In California, K-12 public school enrollment has declined below 6 million for the first time in over two decades, with COVID accounting for only some of the loss. New Brookings research explores whether major federal aid packages directed to schools during COVID, and after the 2008 Great Recession, have been used for the intended purpose.

Join Jim and Greg in breathing an unobstructed sigh of relief as U.S. District Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle finds the federal mask mandate for public transportation unconstitutional. They also cover the fallout from Washington Post tech reporter Taylor Lorenz trying to expose the operator of the Libs of TikTok Twitter page, despite publicly condemning online harassment aimed towards herself just weeks ago. And Texas gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke changes his mind again on the Remain in Mexico policy, now saying it needs to end.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome even more data showing that criminals steer clear from people they suspect may have guns. They also discuss whether the increasing chatter about Russia being willing to use tactical nukes against Ukraine is based in reality. And they wonder why one of the shooters arrested as part of the probe into Saturday’s mass shooting in South Carolina was allowed to go home and might be permitted to go back to work with an ankle monitor.

An American Civilian in WW2 China

 

Paul Springer grew up in New Jersey during the 1920s and 1930s. A smart kid, he graduated high school at 16 in 1934 and worked at a bank. In 1937 he won a full scholarship at Ivy League Yale. Paul wanted adventure. He wanted to travel.

“Blackboards and Bomb Shelters: The Perilous Journey of Americans in China during World War II,” by James P. Bevill, tells what happened next. Yale sponsored the Yali Middle School in Yuanling, Hunan Province in China. It taught in English and Chinese. Every other year Yale sent three Yale graduates to teach there. During his senior year at Yale Paul was invited to apply for one of the positions.

He applied, and with two other Yale graduates sailed to China in July 1941. It was an opportunity to satisfy his dreams of travel during an age when this was rare. While The US was still at peace, China had been at war with Japan longer than Paul had been to Yale. He knew he was entering a war zone. His first-semester teaching at Yali Middle School was punctuated by Japanese air raids.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that the Moskva – the flagship of Russia’s Black Sea fleet – was sunk by missile strikes, even though the Russians won’t admit that part of the story. They’re also glad to see border agents vindicated over the false accusations from President Biden, DHS Sec. Mayorkas and others that they whipped Haitian migrants. And they discover another congressman who won’t go back to Washington – this one for at least a year-and-a-half.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they dive into billionaire Elon Musk’s proposal to buy Twitter and why it makes the left so angry. They also dissect a new report quoting multiple officials alleging California Sen. Diane Feinstein is quickly losing her mental acuity. And Joy Behar of “The View” bizarrely claims that the Supreme Court is poised to “pass a bill” to allow open carry in New York despite the high court having no such power.

Join Jim and Greg as they break down the latest polling on the Senate race in Nevada which has Republican Adam Laxalt ahead of incumbent Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto. They also shake their heads in response to news that Frank James, the suspect in the subway shooting in Brooklyn, was on the FBI’s radar as recently as 2019. This incident is only the latest in a string of cases where the perpetrator was known to the agency before they committed violent actions. And after two weeks, it is obvious that CNN+, CNN’s new premium streaming service, is a pathetic failure with an average viewership of only 10,000 viewers a day.

Join Jim and Greg as they encourage Republicans like Virginia Lt. Governor Winsome Sears to continue to push against the Democrat’s radical education agenda and speculate that the left’s decision to insist upon controversial subjects in classrooms will culminate in a ‘Red Wave’ in November. They also scratch their heads at a floundering Biden administration that seems unable to find a way to curb the rising inflation. And after lambasting Tulsi Gabbard for putting her political career before her constituents in the 2020 presidential race, Hawaii Rep. Kai Kahele has not shown up on Capitol Hill since January.

The Polish Anchor: A Symbol of Resistance

 

See the source imageThe Polish Anchor

The Cheka is the NKVD, which is the KGB, which is the current FSB, which still controls Moscow, where old and new Russian errors still dominate. The same Moscow, under new ideological veneer, whose genocidal intents in Ukraine would lead, if allowed to succeed, to the end of Catholics in that martyred nation. – from the New Catholic, Rorate Caeli

As the Russian war against Ukraine continues, Putin knows that Poland is the lynchpin of resistance to his imperial ambitions. Poland is as the Scots might say, the The Auld Enemy. The auld enemy of the old Czars, and of the new Czar.

Join Jim and Greg as they cover President Biden’s latest all-time low approval rating. Despite delivering a Supreme Court Justice and the waning of the COVID-19 virus, Biden’s approval percentage sank to just 42% in the latest CBS New/YouGov Poll.  They also analyze the host of factors contributing to increasing despair and hopelessness in the American teenager including social media, COVID-19, and the media. And in a desperate attempt to appease his increasingly dissatisfied base, President Biden is taking steps to counter “ghost guns” this week.

Escaping Russia to France

 

Paris of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was a second home to Russia’s nobility. Until the start of the First World War, they retreated to Paris to have fun. Some liked it so much that until the war started they abandoned Russia almost entirely, remaining in Paris year-round.

“After the Romanovs: Russian Exiles in Paris from the Belle Epoque through revolution and war,” by Helen Rappaport, tells their story, following the Russians in France both before and after the Russian Revolution. It is a tale of the wheel of fortune taking those at the pinnacle of life to its nadir. The Revolution reduced Russian princes who lived in luxury to men driving taxis with their wives worked at\ fashion houses to make ends meet.

Rappaport emphasizes the before and after contrasts by opening the book during the Belle Epoque. She shows Russian aristocrats using Paris as a playground, with every want or need provided by their wealth. Republican Paris became a Russian colony, an escape from an uncultured Imperial Russia. One of Tsar Nicholas II’s brothers even moved to Paris, transferring his wealth there.