The Death of Email

 

If you know anyone under, say, 30, you know that email is less popular than texting.

Marketers have noticed. Mobile advertising is getting huge. From TechCentral:

…mobile device users are addicted to their devices. Nokia reported at MindTrek 2010 that the average person looks at their phone 150 times a day, or once every six-and-a-half minutes of every waking hour.

“Coca-Cola’s global strategy is 70:20:10. Seventy percent of its digital spend goes to mobile messaging — MMS and SMS — 20% to mobile Web and only 10% to apps,” says [journalist Tomi] Ahonen.

For some reason, a text has more impact than an email:

A study conducted in New Zealand found that the average e-mail is read 48 hours after it is sent, while the average SMS is read in four minutes. “SMS is literally 720 times faster than e-mail in message-opening throughput.”

Maybe that’s just New Zealand. (They’re weird down there.) But I don’t think so. I know that I tend to jump when a text comes through, while I let my inbox fill up for hours and hours.

So email — which not too long ago represented the fastest, most efficient way to communicate — now lags in effectiveness to texting.

What happens when texting starts to seem too slow?

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Members have made 56 comments.

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  1. Profile photo of EThompson Inactive
    smp16: Phone calls are for longer conversations–calling my mom, catching up with old friends–or for anything business related where I need a quick response.

    To borrow a line from member FeliciaB, this is a Like!

    • #1
    • March 8, 2012 at 1:01 am
  2. Profile photo of Glenn the Iconoclast Inactive

    Since Tom beat me to the mind meld, I’ll have to settle for Morse Code.

    • #2
    • March 8, 2012 at 4:04 am
  3. Profile photo of Guruforhire Member

    I dont leave voice mail. If I wanted to talk to you later I would have called you later or sent an Email.

    I dont use texts for work. Now that work switched out my blackberry (BASTARDS), for an Iphone (CULTIST BASTARDS) I may use texts more.

    Texts are great for routine communication. Like I am at baggage claim C1 or something like that. Trying to explain a technical problem and its resolution is an emailer.

    What is interesting about all the abbreviations is that they arent new. Anything that placed a premium on key strokes always is quickly abbrievated. Look at early computing, and Ham radio communication.

    • #3
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:16 am
  4. Profile photo of Percival Thatcher

    Heads Up Texting (HUT). The message will just be scrolled as it is received across the surface of the special goggles you will have to wear.

    Hopefully, we will have all the bugs in the Robocars tracked down by then. Otherwise, the 101 on a Friday afternoon is gonna get messy…

    • #4
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:28 am
  5. Profile photo of Palaeologus Member
    Rob Long:

    For some reason, a text has more impact than an email:

    A study conducted in New Zealand found that the average e-mail is read 48 hours after it is sent, while the average SMS is read in four minutes. “SMS is literally 720 times faster than e-mail in message-opening throughput.”

    Maybe that’s just New Zealand. (They’re weird down there.) But I don’t think so. I know that I tend to jump when a text comes through, while I let my inbox fill up for hours and hours.

    Isn’t that likely to change as texts? textings? are more widely utilized by advertisers? Seems to me, the higher the proportion of ads, the less we’ll care.

    • #5
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:33 am
  6. Profile photo of Mel Foil Inactive

    In most cases, I don’t want to know what other people are doing. I don’t care. Send me an email, and I’ll read it when I get bored with other things.

    • #6
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:35 am
  7. Profile photo of Southern Pessimist Member

    When I grow up and become both wise and clever, I am going to change my name to Etoiledusud.

    • #7
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:43 am
  8. Profile photo of Jerry the Bastage Member

    What happens when texting starts to seem too slow?

    Remotely operated shock collars.

    • #8
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:43 am
  9. Profile photo of cdor Member

    I still use a flip phone. The dumbest thing I see in everyday life is a mature adult looking at their smart phone every 10 seconds like a teenage girl. If its an emergency, give me a call. If I don’t answer, leave me a message (voice) and I will get it and return it. Thank you very much. I am absolutely as connected as I need to be right now.

    • #9
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:45 am
  10. Profile photo of EJHill Member

    Nothing is more effective than a Rob Long text…

    Texting.jpg

    • #10
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:46 am
  11. Profile photo of Pseudodionysius Member

    What happens when texting starts to seem too slow?

    Gunfire: when it absolutely, positively has to get there.

    • #11
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:55 am
  12. Profile photo of Richard Pugilist Inactive

    Telekinesis: The Future!

    • #12
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:57 am
  13. Profile photo of raycon and lindacon Member

    Ho-hum. Can’t be bothered with the newest gimmick. Mail was once good enough until the feral gubmint lost control of it’s bowels.

    Email is good enough, texting is simply a bother. Got my ole cellular telephone. good enough. Like the fact that emails can be saved. I have ten year old business emails, filed in the correct folders, just in case I have a legal requirement.

    What does texting give you? A kiddie conversation between otherwise grown up adults.

    • #13
    • March 8, 2012 at 5:58 am
  14. Profile photo of flownover Inactive

    Neural idiocy.Boogers en masse. Thinkin’ it’s funny , but it’s—- whoa ! cl sqrl

    • #14
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:03 am
  15. Profile photo of Bryan G. Stephens Reagan

    We use email at work and not text to any degree.

    I really think there is a difference between personal and work, and these studies seem to ignore the use of email in work. .

    • #15
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:03 am
  16. Profile photo of Lance Member

    I was at a wedding back in 2006 in Lake Tahoe and the uncle of the groom was a Yahoo exec in their development department. His job was basically to live in the future. Way back then he expressed the same thing.

    I don’t think email will be a thing of the past anytime soon, I just think its purpose and use will be further differentiated.

    When I check my Blackberry, I review my texts before I check my email.

    Do you want to know what texting IS replacing? Phone calls. Especially to family members on the weekend. So much can be accomplished with a quick “Hey! Hope All is Well!”

    • #16
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:05 am
  17. Profile photo of Percival Thatcher
    Lance: I was at a wedding back in 2006 in Lake Tahoe and the uncle of the groom was a Yahoo exec in their development department. His job was basically to live in the future. Way back then he expressed the same thing.

    I don’t think email will be a thing of the past anytime soon, I just think its purpose and use will be further differentiated.

    When I check my Blackberry, I review my texts before I check my email.

    Do you want to know what texting IS replacing? Phone calls. Especially to family members on the weekend. So much can be accomplished with a quick “Hey! Hope All is Well!” · 3 minutes ago

    But they text each other back and forth, Lance. Two minutes of conversation is being replaced by a half hour of thumb typing.

    • #17
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:10 am
  18. Profile photo of Yeah...ok. Member

    As the age threshold of cell device ownership lowers, the amount of text traffic increases. The data needs to try and be normalized. The kids increase text volume and spam increase average inbox wait time.

    • #18
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:11 am
  19. Profile photo of Basil Fawlty Member

    I got my first spam text several days ago. I immediately called Verizon and blocked texting on my account and got a $.20 credit for the cost of that incoming text message. It felt good.

    • #19
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:16 am
  20. Profile photo of Southern Pessimist Member

    Well, it never occured to me that texting could substitute for talking to close family members. Maybe there is some good in the technology.

    • #20
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:18 am
  21. Profile photo of Southern Pessimist Member

    Actually, I do do text my sons. I resend the same message. Call me.

    • #21
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:21 am
  22. Profile photo of Tom Lindholtz Inactive

    Vulcan Mind Melds.

    Until then, I use the phone for detailed messages that require interaction, I use text for quick notes where I don’t need/want to talk, I use email for thoughtful, careful writing….primarily just because I have big hands and the computer keyboard is easieer than my iPhone or my iPad.

    • #22
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:27 am
  23. Profile photo of Mr. Dart Coolidge

    Clicking “like” just wasn’t enough on this one, EJ. Perfect.

    EJHill
    dogsbody: I’m going to call it the “phone”

    WTSN! Come here. Need 2 C U! · 9 hours ago

    • #23
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:32 am
  24. Profile photo of Roberto Inactive
    Rob Long: What happens when texting starts to seem too slow? · · 1 hour ago

    twitter

    With the added benefit of a maximum 140 characters in a message it becomes the perfect medium for the attention span of the modern on the go citizenry.

    • #24
    • March 8, 2012 at 6:36 am
  25. Profile photo of Cunctator Inactive

    Perhaps more important is the impending death of the desktop computer. Texting and Twitter can’t hold all relevant work information, as mentioned above by BGS and Lance

    • #25
    • March 8, 2012 at 7:14 am
  26. Profile photo of Foxman Inactive

    This is somewhat tangential, but I think relevant

    I am an engineer. Another engineer and I were waiting for a test cell to get to the proper temperature so we could start our test. With us were a janitor and a test technician. We were comparing cell phones. The other engineer and I had inexpensive flip phones. Both the janitor and the technician had $300 razors. The combined wages of the two probably did not equal either of ours.

    I’m guessing that the technician was in his thirties. The other engineer and I are in our fifties. This might explain it except for the fact that the janitor was in her fifties too.

    Maybe it is just that engineers are cheap.

    • #26
    • March 8, 2012 at 7:29 am
  27. Profile photo of Spin Thatcher

    Email inside work, text outside of work. Why? What I want to say at work in an email is usually more of an announcement of a communication of various facts or policies or changes. Wha I want to do in a text is have a remote conversation. Two totally different things are going on. Back before IM and

    • #27
    • March 8, 2012 at 7:38 am
  28. Profile photo of Dave Carter Contributor

    I have this little gizmo bluetooth attached to my ear most of the day now. Because the nice lady at the kiosk made it “sync” with my contact list on my phone, when a text is sent to me, a lovely voice reads the text in my ear, sparing me the need to tap the phone and actually read the text. Then, when I want to reply, I tell the magic lady voice in my phone to “send a text” to whomever and tell them whatever. And the phone composes the text and sends it for me. It’s almost like…..like an old fashioned telephone call! I think they call it progress.

    • #28
    • March 8, 2012 at 7:53 am
  29. Profile photo of Ajax von Kaiserpenguin Inactive
    Rob Long: What happens when texting starts to seem too slow?

    Telepathy by satellite relay.

    • #29
    • March 8, 2012 at 7:53 am
  30. Profile photo of Astonishing Inactive

    You are all a bunch of pathetic fuddie duddies.

    How do I know you are all a bunch of pathetic fuddie duddies?

    Because, soon enough, anyone who thinks himself civilized will be fully wet-wired and synced to the big whatever in the sky . . . so you are all right now thinking, “I hope I’ll be dead before that happens.” 

    And that, my dear fuddie duddies, is the eternal definition of a fuddie duddie: A person who, even just one time, thinks, “I hope I’m long gone before that happens.”

    • #30
    • March 8, 2012 at 8:02 am
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