Sometimes Hollywood Gets It Right

 

We are all familiar with the abundance of warped values Hollywood and other American arts pump into the human noosphere on the topics of politics and religion.

Sometimes though, if you look for it, you can find a bit of real gold hidden amoungst the leftist pyrite. One of my favorite examples is the “Republic” speech by John Wayne, playing Davy Crockett in the movie The Alamo.

Are there other examples you can find and share of Hollywood getting it right?

Enjoy the monologue:

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Members have made 28 comments.

  1. Profile photo of Seawriter Member

    That scene was filmed over 50 years ago. Wayne was an outlier in Hollywood even then. Today he would be blacklisted.

    Mark

    • #1
    • January 19, 2013 at 7:49 am
  2. Profile photo of TeeJaw Member

    Mark is right. There must be lots of examples of Hollywood getting it right. It’s just that they are all over 50 years ago. Mister Smith went to Washington to fix a problem. Now Mr. Jones goes to Washington to get laid.

    • #2
    • January 19, 2013 at 7:55 am
  3. Profile photo of Scott R Member

    To further the “fifty years ago” point, Linus’s speech in A Charlie Brown Christmas is as good as it gets.

    • #3
    • January 19, 2013 at 8:02 am
  4. Profile photo of Tommy De Seno Contributor
    Tommy De Seno Post author
    Scott Reusser: To further the “fifty years ago” point, Linus’s speech in A Charlie Brown Christmas is as good as it gets. · 2 minutes ago

    Great example!

    • #4
    • January 19, 2013 at 8:07 am
  5. Profile photo of Scott R Member

    Can’t point to a particular speech necessarily, but A&E’s production of Pride and Prejudice is the single best recent combo of good, wholesome values and entertainment. It has none of the psuedo “sucking face” passion of other modern versions yet is funny and clever.

    As a family we must’ve watched that DVD fifty times over the years — since our kids were very young and often as just background noise — and, seriously, I really think it’s been an effective under-the-radar way to hardwire wholesome values into our kids. 

    • #5
    • January 19, 2013 at 8:17 am
  6. Profile photo of Commodore BTC Member

    Jack Webb

    • #7
    • January 19, 2013 at 8:51 am
  7. Profile photo of Tommy De Seno Contributor
    Tommy De Seno Post author
    Scott Reusser: Can’t point to a particular speech necessarily, but A&E’s production of Pride and Prejudice is the single best recent combo of good, wholesome values and entertainment. It has none of the psuedo “sucking face” passion of other modern versions yet is funny and clever.

    As a family we must’ve watched that DVD fifty times over the years — since our kids were very young and often as just background noise — and, seriously, I really think it’s been an effective under-the-radar way to hardwire wholesome values into our kids. · 45 minutes ago

    Never seen it but I will now.

    • #8
    • January 19, 2013 at 9:06 am
  8. Profile photo of Tommy De Seno Contributor
    Tommy De Seno Post author

    .

    Ningrim: Jack Webb · 18 minutes ago

    I’ve seen that one and had forgotten it. I won’t forget it again! I may show it to my college aged kids/relatives.

    • #10
    • January 19, 2013 at 9:10 am
  9. Profile photo of Scott R Member
    Ningrim: Jack Webb · 35 minutes ago

    “Don’t try to make a new country. Try to make the old one work better.”

    Nice.

    • #11
    • January 19, 2013 at 9:32 am
  10. Profile photo of Aaron Miller Member

    Any John Wayne movie will do. From McLintock:

    There’s no such thing as free land. You make these homesteads go, you’ll have earned every acre of it. But you just can’t make ’em go on the Mesa Verde. God made that country for buffalo. Serves pretty well for cattle. But it hates the plow. And even the government should know you can’t farm 6000 feet above sea level!

    You can’t beat reality. And politicians have no idea what it looks like.

    • #13
    • January 19, 2013 at 9:57 am
  11. Profile photo of Great Ghost of Gödel Inactive

    [Hobby shop proprietor violates CoC]

    “Excuse me, sir, but I’d really appreciate it if you wouldn’t take the Lord’s name in vain again.”

    “You got a problem with that, partner?”

    “Yes. I have a big problem with that.”

    — Adam Weber, played to perfection by Brendan Fraser in Blast From the Past

    “Mom and Dad’s lives could be in jeopardy! Or worse…their marriage!”

    — Violet Parr, voiced by Sarah Vowell in The Incredibles

    “If you so much as set foot downtown, you will be sorry. I’m in a prayer group with the D.A., I’m a member of the NRA and I’m always packing.”

    — Leigh Anne Touhy, played by Sandra Bullock in The Blind Side

    • #14
    • January 20, 2013 at 2:04 am
  12. Profile photo of James Of England Moderator

    It’s not Hollywood, but Medal of Honor is probably the most patriotic war visual narrative I’ve seen. It’s a true story that should be more widely known, the Americans are heroic and awesome, the enemies terrible human beings, and a 2 against 30 fight is unfair to the 30. It’s gripping, noble, and brought tears to my eyes. Plus, it’s kind of fun. Sadly, the sequal was fictional. If you don’t play video games, buy a copy for your kid, or for a kid you can borrow, and you can watch the story without the hassle of playing yourself. Support patriotism to encourage more of it.

    • #15
    • January 20, 2013 at 4:20 am
  13. Profile photo of Tommy De Seno Contributor
    Tommy De Seno Post author
    James Of England: It’s not Hollywood, but Medal of Honor is probably the most patriotic war visual narrative I’ve seen. It’s a true story that should be more widely known, the Americans are heroic and awesome, the enemies terrible human beings, and a 2 against 30 fight is unfair to the 30. It’s gripping, noble, and brought tears to my eyes. Plus, it’s kind of fun. Sadly, the sequal was fictional. If you don’t play video games, buy a copy for your kid, or for a kid you can borrow, and you can watch the story without the hassle of playing yourself. Support patriotism to encourage more of it. · 4 hours ago

    Interesting! I didn’t know any of the war games were based upon true stories. My boys have so many if they don’t have this one I’ll get if for them and let them know the background. Thanks for the tip.

    • #16
    • January 20, 2013 at 8:51 am
  14. Profile photo of James Of England Moderator
    Tommy De Seno
    James Of England: 

    Interesting! I didn’t know any of the war games were based upon true stories. 

    I think that some of the WWII shooters are, too, but MoH is the only positive account of modern military heroism I know of that doesn’t either require you to open/ listen to a book or feature Bin Laden (which is sort of different). 

    Nothing against WWII, but seeing Americans doing good things today means that your boys would have something to attach to their thanking the troops when they do. If they thank a WWII vet for his service, they’ll already have a ton of positive associations. It doesn’t go into the high level stuff, so whether you’re “I don’t support the war, but I do support the troops” or a supporter of both, you’ll find a positive lesson there and no harm. Unfortunately, it got a bad rep in parts of the right blogosphere as the multiplayer game lets you play both sides, which some find offensive, but the player v player game in this instance was kind of an afterthought anyway.

    • #17
    • January 20, 2013 at 9:29 am
  15. Profile photo of KC Mulville Member

    Nothing new about it. People have been referring to Shakespeare, or even the Bible, for centuries. This is part of what culture does for you … it gives you pre-packaged, readily understandable stories that carry ideas, and those ideas come in handy during everyday life.

    Hollywood stinks at some things, but when they use that skill for a good purpose, you see how useful it is to the culture.

    I frequently use well-known speeches or even phrases to communicate some point. Sometimes, all I have to do is start with a few words, and people who’ve seen that movie can instantly spot the point:

    • What we have on our hands is a dead shark
    • Stupid is as stupid does
    • Charlie don’t surf

    But as for speeches, Hollywood doesn’t like soliloquies anymore, which is kind of a shame. Shakespeare made a living off them. The Hollywood ones I like the most are

    • Casablanca: Rick’s “here’s looking at you, kid” speech
    • Most anything Katherine Hepburn says in The Lion in Winter.
    • Patton‘s opening
    • #18
    • January 20, 2013 at 12:55 pm
  16. Profile photo of Dad of Four Member

    George C Scott in the opening speech of Patton

    • #19
    • January 20, 2013 at 12:55 pm
  17. Profile photo of Douglas Member

    Hate to be the wet blanket here (honestly), especially as I love John Wayne movies and just about everything they stand for, and I’m very sympathetic to the subject of the thread. But Wayne’s character is 100 percent wrong on this. “Republic”, in and of itself stands for none of things he mentioned. A Republic is simply a non-royal form of government. France is a republic. The Soviet Union was a republic. China is a republic. Fascist Italy was, for a time, a republic. Republican governments alone ensure none of the virtues he mentioned. There are several royal countries with better freedom and property rights than many republics.

    • #20
    • January 21, 2013 at 2:48 am
  18. Profile photo of dittoheadadt Member

    Colonel Nathan Jessup at the end of A Few Good Men even though the filmmakers make his “speech” into an indictment.

    • #21
    • January 21, 2013 at 4:35 am
  19. Profile photo of Tommy De Seno Contributor
    Tommy De Seno Post author
    dittoheadadt: Colonel Nathan Jessup at the end of A Few Good Men even though the filmmakers make his “speech” into an indictment. · 10 minutes ago

    Agreed!

    • #22
    • January 21, 2013 at 4:46 am
  20. Profile photo of Mantis9 Member

    I’d put up “the Incredibles” as a great conservative movie. A father finds himself without wrecking his family. His wife, who once had a career, but chooses and finds fulfillment at home, supports him and holds him responsible even when given all the worldly incentive to walk away. 

    Having watched this film a few hundred times (I do not exaggerate) with my kids, I still enjoy it as purely entertainment. 

    My favorite scene is between Edna “E” Mode and Helen Parr/Elastigir.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLDWhn8HZfY

    • #23
    • January 21, 2013 at 7:04 am
  21. Profile photo of aardo vozz Member

    Not Hollywood,but just about anything James Faulkner(playing Herod Agrippa) says in “I, Claudius”

    • #24
    • January 21, 2013 at 7:29 am
  22. Profile photo of aardo vozz Member

    Hollywood getting it right,not necessarily in a good way, towards the end of the movie “Spartacus”:

    Batiatus(played by Peter Ustinov): “Come with us. See to it I don’t misuse the money.”

    Gracchus(played by Charles Laughton): “Don’t be ridiculous. I’m a Senator.”

    • #25
    • January 21, 2013 at 7:37 am
  23. Profile photo of Bartholomew Xerxes Ogilvie, Jr. Member
    Mantis9: I’d put up “the Incredibles” as a great conservative movie. A father finds himself without wrecking his family. His wife, who once had a career, but chooses and finds fulfillment at home, supports him and holds him responsible even when given all the worldly incentive to walk away. 

    Having watched this film a few hundred times (I do not exaggerate) with my kids, I still enjoy it as purely entertainment. 

    My favorite scene is between Edna “E” Mode and Helen Parr/Elastigir.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLDWhn8HZfY · 14 hours ago

    Helen Parr to her kids: “Remember the bad guys on the shows you used to watch on Saturday mornings? Well, these guys aren’t like those guys. They won’t exercise restraint because you are children. They will kill you if they get the chance. Do not give them that chance.”

    That really resonated, coming just a few years after 9/11.

    • #26
    • January 21, 2013 at 9:52 am
  24. Profile photo of Bartholomew Xerxes Ogilvie, Jr. Member

    I loved the moment in Iron Man 2 when Tony Stark says to Congress: “You want my property? You can’t have it.”

    • #27
    • January 21, 2013 at 9:54 am
  25. Profile photo of Great Ghost of Gödel Inactive
    Bartholomew Xerxes Ogilvie, Jr.: I loved the moment inIron Man 2 when Tony Stark says to Congress: “You want my property? You can’t have it.”

    “I have a really interesting political point of view, and it’s not always something I say too loud at dinner tables here, but you can’t go from a $2,000-a-night suite at La Mirage to a penitentiary and really understand it and come out a liberal. You can’t. I wouldn’t wish that experience on anyone else, but it was very, very, very educational for me and has informed my proclivities and politics ever since.” — Robert Downey, Jr.

    • #28
    • January 22, 2013 at 2:32 am