Ricochet: Home of the Conservatarians?

 

41HW16e6UrLLast year, my good friend Will Patrick, here in Tallahassee, Florida, introduced me to the Ricochet podcasts. The first episode that caught my attention was one dedicated to President Reagan’s first meeting with Gorbachev at Reykjavik. It was fascinating.

For more than 10 years, I have been involved in the conservative/liberty movement through my current work at The James Madison Institute (JMI) in Florida, and previously with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI). Between what I read and the many speakers I get to meet and hear from in person and at conferences, I felt like I had a great grasp on all the top scholars and thinkers in the movement. However, the Ricochet podcast has served to introduce me to so many more, including people like Avik Roy and Charles C.W. Cooke. During my many travels visiting JMI’s supporters around the state of Florida, I listen to the podcast almost religiously and find it quite entertaining and thoughtful. [Editor’s Note: Want to become a member of Ricochet and get a free month on us? Join today and use the coupon code APRIL for your discount.]

After hearing Charlie Cooke on the Ricochet podcast several times, I migrated over to his Mad Dogs & Englishmen podcast. And I recently read his fascinating new book, The Conservatarian Manifesto (of which I will soon post a review).

JMI and National Review also recently formed a new partnership and we were privileged to have Charlie speak at three of our events this past week in Naples, Tampa, and Orlando. I have come to the conclusion that Charlie and his “conservatarian” philosophy (one I share) is basically a libertarian who has an appreciation for history, tradition, and culture (read: reality). Too many libertarians do not have this appreciation; and perhaps too many conservatives try to use the power of government to achieve ends they’d like to see. I think Charlie strikes that middle ground for those of us who feel libertarian when we’re around conservatives and conservative when we’re around libertarians.

The thoughtfulness that comes across in Charlie’s book and his podcast — and that is shared by all the hosts and (most of) the guests on the Ricochet podcast, was true in person as well. He spent a great deal of time speaking and conversing with attendees after our events. And we enjoyed the long and deep conversations we had with him over dinner and drinks during our little tour of Southwest and Central Florida.

I have also been pleased to hear one of my neighbors here in Tallahassee, Rick Wilson, on the Ricochet podcast. I have gotten to know Rick here in Tallahassee — and he’s everyone’s favorite on Twitter — but it’s great to hear his banter on the air as well. Last year, through another organization I’m involved with, I also had the opportunity to meet Troy Senik and learn he was the Editor-in-Chief of Ricochet!

This is really an incredible community of scholars, writers, thinkers, and doers. And overall I think Charlie Cooke’s “conservatarian” philosophy may be the “glue” to hold together our community of freedom lovers. With his insight, writing style, historical knowledge, and political pragmatism, I think he has the opportunity to be the William F. Buckley, Jr. of our times. Yes, he’s only 30 years old, but so was Buckley when he founded National Review in 1955. The great thing about Ricochet is seeing all the up-and-coming young writers and a community that appreciates new thinking while holding fast to timeless principles.

I became a member of Ricochet several months ago, but this is my first post. I hope to contribute more, but I want to say thank you to all of you who are part of this community and especially to Troy, Peter, James, and Rob.

 

Members have made 17 comments.

  1. Profile photo of Troy Senik Editor

    Please welcome Francisco to Ricochet, everyone! He’s a great guy — and JMI is a great organization — and he’ll be a welcome addition to the site.

    • #1
    • April 19, 2015 at 11:57 am
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  2. Profile photo of Nanda Panjandrum

    Welcome in, Francisco! Mad Dogs and Englishmen is a favorite of mine, too…Looking forward to hearing more about JMI!

    • #2
    • April 19, 2015 at 12:58 pm
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  3. Profile photo of Randy Webster Member

    MD&E would be even more a favorite of mine if they’d do more than one a month.

    • #3
    • April 19, 2015 at 1:23 pm
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  4. Profile photo of Randy Weivoda Thatcher

    Welcome to Ricochet, Francisco. I think you’ll find that there are a lot of Charles C.W. Cooke fans here.

    • #4
    • April 19, 2015 at 1:42 pm
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  5. Profile photo of Francisco Gonzalez Member
    Francisco Gonzalez Post author

    Thanks all! By the way, it appears “my feed” is empty. It says to “start a conversation” and I thought I did that with this post, but perhaps this only goes on the “member feed.” Should I be also putting this in “my feed”? Or is there a way to also have it go there?

    • #5
    • April 19, 2015 at 1:45 pm
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  6. Profile photo of A-Squared Member

    “My Feed” will show you comments by other members that you have selected to follow, it won’t show your own comments. If someone follows you, then this comment will show up in their feed.

    • #6
    • April 19, 2015 at 3:58 pm
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  7. Profile photo of Max Ledoux Admin

    Asquared:“My Feed” will show you comments by other members that you have selected to follow, it won’t show your own comments. If someone follows you, then this comment will show up in their feed.

    My Feed shows you posts that you are following, and posts published by members or contributors that you follow.

    Here’s how to follow a post, including how to automatically follow a post when you comment on it.

    • #7
    • April 19, 2015 at 6:19 pm
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  8. Profile photo of Allan Rutter Member

    Welcome, FG! Post away. I enjoyed listening to Charles reading his book on Audible. He and Kevin are gifted writers.

    • #8
    • April 19, 2015 at 7:36 pm
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  9. Profile photo of Concretevol Thatcher

    Glad to have you here Francisco! Hope you post early and often. 🙂

    • #9
    • April 20, 2015 at 5:22 am
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  10. Profile photo of A-Squared Member

    Max Ledoux, Admin:

    Asquared:“My Feed” will show you comments by other members that you have selected to follow, it won’t show your own comments. If someone follows you, then this comment will show up in their feed.

    My Feed shows you posts that you are following, and posts published by members or contributors that you follow.

    Here’s how to follow a post, including how to automatically follow a post when you comment on it.

    Thanks. I never know how to differentiate what I call the OP in a thread from the following posts, but I will endeavor to use “Posts” and “Comments” from now on.

    • #10
    • April 20, 2015 at 6:58 am
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  11. Profile photo of Matt Bartle Member

    Welcome! I’m reading The Conservatarian Manifesto right now.

    • #11
    • April 20, 2015 at 9:35 am
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  12. Profile photo of Douglas Inactive

    Like so-called compassionate conservatism, I’m ready for this to die already. It’s basically just rebranding of the same concept we’ve seen for years: “Hey, I’ve got an idea… lets keep the economic stuff and chuck the social stuff!”. Some of it is Libertarians that think the Libertarian label = crazy in the public’s mind. Others are Conservatives that don’t want to be seen as one of those conservatives around their more liberal friends.

    • #12
    • April 20, 2015 at 2:30 pm
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  13. Profile photo of Jamie Lockett Reagan

    Douglas:Like so-called compassionate conservatism, I’m ready for this to die already. It’s basically just rebranding of the same concept we’ve seen for years: “Hey, I’ve got an idea… lets keep the economic stuff and chuck the social stuff!”. Some of it is Libertarians that think the Libertarian label = crazy in the public’s mind. Others are Conservatives that don’t want to be seen as one of those conservatives around their more liberal friends.

    Clearly you haven’t read the book.

    • #13
    • April 20, 2015 at 2:39 pm
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  14. Profile photo of John Paul Inactive

    The Conservatarian Manifesto is a great book. MD&E is one of the best podcasts I listen to. Charles CW Cooke argues persuasively for classic liberalism and liberty. He distinguishes between various “social” issues effectively. Cooke provides a coherent pro-life argument by appeal to reason and natural law. I admire Cooke’s intelligence, courage, and good humor, which are on display in his book and his podcast with Kevin Williamson.

    • #14
    • April 20, 2015 at 7:57 pm
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  15. Profile photo of Douglas Inactive

    Jamie Lockett:

    Douglas:Like so-called compassionate conservatism, I’m ready for this to die already. It’s basically just rebranding of the same concept we’ve seen for years: “Hey, I’ve got an idea… lets keep the economic stuff and chuck the social stuff!”. Some of it is Libertarians that think the Libertarian label = crazy in the public’s mind. Others are Conservatives that don’t want to be seen as one of those conservatives around their more liberal friends.

    Clearly you haven’t read the book.

    Doesn’t matter what’s in his book. My point stands… many of the people that call themselves conservatarians are as described. Charley Cooke can try to define the term however he likes. But lots of people are jumping on it, fad-like, for reasons stated above.

    • #15
    • April 20, 2015 at 8:22 pm
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  16. Profile photo of A-Squared Member

    Douglas:

    Jamie Lockett:

    Douglas:Like so-called compassionate conservatism, I’m ready for this to die already. It’s basically just rebranding of the same concept we’ve seen for years: “Hey, I’ve got an idea… lets keep the economic stuff and chuck the social stuff!”. Some of it is Libertarians that think the Libertarian label = crazy in the public’s mind. Others are Conservatives that don’t want to be seen as one of those conservatives around their more liberal friends.

    Clearly you haven’t read the book.

    Doesn’t matter what’s in his book. My point stands… many of the people that call themselves conservatarians are as described. Charley Cooke can try to define the term however he likes. But lots of people are jumping on it, fad-like, for reasons stated above.

    At its core, the book is a defense of the federal system of limited federal government with variation / experimentation at the state and local level that is inherent in the US Constitution.

    So, it is indeed a very old idea, about 230 years old.

    I would also say it doesn’t simply say let’s chuck the social issues, it says lets return those issues to local control, which is VERY different than a federal run “Compassionate Conservatism” (which was neither compasstionate nor conservative, but that’s a discussion for another thread)

    • #16
    • April 21, 2015 at 7:21 am
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  17. Profile photo of Jamie Lockett Reagan

    Douglas:

    Jamie Lockett:

    Douglas:Like so-called compassionate conservatism, I’m ready for this to die already. It’s basically just rebranding of the same concept we’ve seen for years: “Hey, I’ve got an idea… lets keep the economic stuff and chuck the social stuff!”. Some of it is Libertarians that think the Libertarian label = crazy in the public’s mind. Others are Conservatives that don’t want to be seen as one of those conservatives around their more liberal friends.

    Clearly you haven’t read the book.

    Doesn’t matter what’s in his book. My point stands… many of the people that call themselves conservatarians are as described. Charley Cooke can try to define the term however he likes. But lots of people are jumping on it, fad-like, for reasons stated above.

    This kind of thinking worries me for its myopia and lack of engagement outside of your own like-minded circle.

    • #17
    • April 21, 2015 at 8:17 am
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