Petraeus, Gone

 

This just in from NBC:

Central Intelligence Agency Director David Petraeus has resigned, citing an extra-marital affair, NBC News reported. 

“Yesterday afternoon, I went to the White House and asked the President to be allowed, for personal reasons, to resign from my position,” Petraeus said in his resignation letter. “After being married for over 37 years, I showed extremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramarital affair. Such behavior is unacceptable, both as a husband and as the leader of an organization such as ours.”

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Members have made 103 comments.

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  1. Profile photo of KayBee Inactive

    OK–scratch that one from the 2016 list.

    • #1
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:24 am
  2. Profile photo of Lavaux Inactive

    Can heroes serve a despot? Yes, but only if their deeds define their heroism. In the end, who was the better man: Achilles or Odysseus?

    • #2
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:27 am
  3. Profile photo of GypsyNuke Inactive

    Strikes me as a convenient way to get THE GUY who knows it all regarding Benghazi out of the way and bound by confidentiality agreements. I’m shocked that a person in power in DC had an affair – NOT; while I don’t condone that behavior, we’re not living in Victorian times. Refresh my memory on this one, but William Jefferson Clinton resigned … right?

    • #3
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:29 am
  4. Profile photo of Troy Stephens Inactive

    It’s entirely possible he resigned for the reason cited, but something about this doesn’t feel right.

    • #4
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:30 am
  5. Profile photo of Vance Richards Member

    Sad, but how come Presidents don’t feel the need resign over such things.

    • #5
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:30 am
  6. Profile photo of EThompson Inactive

    2012 is officially annointed “annus horribilis.”

    • #6
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:32 am
  7. Profile photo of Southern Pessimist Member

    I don’t know Gen. Petraeus but I do know human nature. His statement should have been “After 37 years of marriage, I got caught having an extramarrietal affair.”

    • #7
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:37 am
  8. Profile photo of Casey Member

    Where do these powerful people find all this time to screw around? I’m just a 9-5 schlub and I can’t even find time to watch The Office.

    • #8
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:38 am
  9. Profile photo of jarhead Inactive
    Troy Stephens: It’s entirely possible he resigned for the reason cited, but something about this doesn’t feel right. · 8 minutes ago

    I agree with Troy. Something about this doesn’t pass the smell test.

    Also, if he’s guilty of adultery, and he’s still in the Army, is he resigning? There’s an Army general being court martialed right now for conduct unbecoming an officer.

    • #9
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:39 am
  10. Profile photo of Frozen Chosen Thatcher

    Hmmm, maybe Petraeus is Republican after all – a Democrat would never resign over a simple “affair”.

    • #10
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:41 am
  11. Profile photo of Douglas Member

    A perfect representative of the rot of Obama rule. Why retire?

    • #11
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:42 am
  12. Profile photo of Melanie Graham Contributor

    Was he “busy” the night of the Benghazi Terrorist attack? This is very odd, but do believe he would resign over this coming to light.

    • #12
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:43 am
  13. Profile photo of Douglas Member
    Vance Richards: Sad, but how come Presidents don’t feel the need resign over such things. · 12 minutes ago

    David Petraeus: “I’m resigning because I had an affair”

    Bill Clinton: “LOL. Amateur.”

    • #13
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:44 am
  14. Profile photo of Blake Neff Inactive

    My understanding is that affairs are particularly frowned upon in the intelligence community due to their potential compromising nature (look up the word “honeypot”). In fact, higher-ups can fire their subordinates if they discover they’re having one. As such, the man on top having an affair and not resigning would be a very bad image.

    • #14
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:44 am
  15. Profile photo of RCE Inactive
    RCE

    OK. This is weird.

    Benghazi: kept quiet until after the election.

    Iranian jets shoot at US Pred: kept quiet until after the election.

    Lauded General* from Bush era ‘has affair’: kept quiet until after the election.

    *I’m not personally a fan; his apologia with de Mistura on the lawn in Kabul after a mob murdered a crew of UN workers in Mazar-e-Sharif was an example of everything that’s wrong with the West, and despicable behaviour for a US General.

    • #15
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:45 am
  16. Profile photo of Paul Dougherty Member

    I am somewhat in awe. THIS is how you run a kingdom!

    • #16
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:47 am
  17. Profile photo of Troy Senik Editor
    Troy Senik Post author

    I wanted to avoid speculation in the main post, but this strikes me as extremely odd. Why volunteer the fact of the affair? I can only think of two rationales: (1) to preempt a story that was brewing in the press (2) to distract from questions about whether the resignation was related to Benghazi. 

    It’s entirely normal for senior officials to hang up their spurs in the transition from a first to a second term. It’s not as if Petraeus deciding to go home would have made the entire Washington press corps assume he was having an affair. They would, however, have been asking about Benghazi. 

    I hope I’m wrong, but this just doesn’t smell right.

    • #17
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:47 am
  18. Profile photo of Paul Dougherty Member
    KayBee: OK–scratch that one from the 2016 list. · 23 minutes ago

    Biden’s running mate?

    • #18
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:48 am
  19. Profile photo of MMPadre Inactive
    GypsyNuke: Strikes me as a convenient way to get THE GUY who knows it all regarding Benghazi out of the way and bound by confidentiality agreements. I’m shocked that a person in power in DC had an affair – NOT; while I don’t condone that behavior, we’re not living in Victorian times. Refresh my memory on this one, but William Jefferson Clinton resigned … right? · 18 minutes ago

    Exactly, the only questions being: did he fall on his sword, or was he pushed?

    • #19
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:49 am
  20. Profile photo of Pencilvania Member

    Any Republican who is offered a position in this administration better beware interns & assistants who seem too impressed with their, ahem, bipartisanship.

    What an example Mitt could have been.

    • #20
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:50 am
  21. Profile photo of ConservativeWanderer Inactive

    I just spoke to Pat Richardson, my go-to guy for news like this.

    He says he had zero hint of the affair before this. So it almost certainly wasn’t about to leak.

    I smell Benghazi. And panic. And a former General running as fast and as far as he can from Ground Zero.

    • #21
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:52 am
  22. Profile photo of Jeffery Shepherd Member

    Divorce papers on the way and the press gets wind of it? That would be one reason to resign this way. I wonder if the affair was with a foreigner. That would certainly be grounds for resignation. 

    • #22
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:54 am
  23. Profile photo of Karen Member

    Please tell me she wasn’t a spy. I want to know who this woman is, and fast. This relationship has the potential to not only put agents in the field in harm’s way, it could jeopardize our national security. There’s no telling what information he revealed to her. This is bad. Very bad. If he is any kind of man, he better start singing like a bird.

    • #23
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:56 am
  24. Profile photo of Tahadden Member

    CIA, State, AG, Fed, Treasury. Remember when Nixon told all of the Cabinet to give him letters of resignation, so he could pick which ones to keep. Obama’s Cabinet just skipped a step

    • #24
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:56 am
  25. Profile photo of Commodore BTC Member

    as long as he’s forced to testify under oath about Benghazi, why he resigned is immaterial

    • #25
    • November 10, 2012 at 1:57 am
  26. Profile photo of Troy Stephens Inactive
    MMPadre

    did he fall on his sword, or was he pushed? · 6 minutes ago

    Bingo.

    • #26
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:00 am
  27. Profile photo of Nick Stuart Thatcher
    EThompson: 2012 is officially annointed “annus horribilis.” · 22 minutes ago

    You spelled “annus” with one “n” too many.

    The conspiracy-minded teeming masses may speculate that he has lied about having an affair when he didn’t actually have one, just to have a convenient reason to get out of Dodge and get clear of the Missus (for whatever reason) at the same time.

    • #27
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:01 am
  28. Profile photo of SpinozaCarWash Inactive
    Troy Stephens: It’s entirely possible he resigned for the reason cited, but something about this doesn’t feel right. · 28 minutes ago

    Two quick thoughts. First, will he replace Shirley Tilghman as Princeton’s next president? Second, if his story is to be believed, the administration can not use his infidelities to keep him from testifying before Congress n the Benghazi fiasco.

    • #28
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:02 am
  29. Profile photo of EThompson Inactive
    Troy Senik, Ed.: Why volunteer the fact of the affair? I can only think of two rationales: (1) to preempt a story that was brewing in the press (2) to distract from questions about whether the resignation was related to Benghazi. 

    I hope I’m wrong, but this just doesn’t smell right.

    That was my gut reaction as well; this doesn’t appear to be a story that would cause a man to step down from one of the most powerful positions in the country. Sad to say, but extramarital activity wasn’t able to take down Bill Clinton, let alone a military man held in such high esteem by both political parties.

    Pencilvania: What an example Mitt could have been.

    Did you have to pour salt into an open wound?

    • #29
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:08 am
  30. Profile photo of Steven Jones Coolidge

    Regarding the averted testimony:

    It is a Senate hearing.

    The Senate is run by Democrats.

    The Senate is not interested in getting all the facts surrounding the Benghazi debacle.

    • #30
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:08 am
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