Mitt Romney, Soothsayer

 

Over at Bizpacreview.com — which is a new discovery for me — Michael Dorstewitz suggests that former presidential candidate Mitt Romney may be the next Nostradamus. Brace yourself for some mindblowing predictions:

On Jan. 14, Chrysler’s CEO acknowledged that Jeeps would be built in China, confirming a statement that unfairly earned Romney the moniker “liar of the year.”

Score one.

Then, when forces linked to al-Qaida captured the government-held town of Konna, Mali, on Jan. 10, they drove home a statement Romney made during the second presidential debate in Boca Raton, nearly three months earlier.

“With the Arab Spring came a great deal of hope that there would be a change towards more moderation and opportunity for greater participation on the part of women and — and public life and in economic life in the Middle East,” he said then. “But instead we’ve seen in nation after nation a number of disturbing events.”

Score two.

This week saw another Romney prediction come to pass — that a re-elected Obama would infringe on our Second Amendment rights.

“In a second term, he would be unrestrained by the demands of re-election,” Romney said at an April 2012 National Rifle Association convention in St. Louis, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Referring to the right to bear arms, Romney told convention-goers, “If we are going to safeguard our Second Amendment, it is time to elect a president who will defend the rights President Obama ignores or minimizes. I will.”

Score three.

Finally, Romney was ridiculed for using “binders of women” to describe what a Romney Cabinet would look like. Instead of mocking the poorly worded phrase, we should have listened to the words themselves.

The president’s announcement of his second-term Cabinet prompted ABC’s George Stephanopoulos to ask on Jan. 10, “Where are the women?” Apparently, they’re all still in Romney’s binders.

Score four.

Eerie, no? I’ve got the shivers from this. I’m not sure, actually, that I’d really want someone with such spooky supernatural powers to be in the Oval Office.

There are 25 comments.

  1. Inactive

    Hillary Clinton:

    “What does it matter, now?”

    • #1
    • January 24, 2013 at 10:42 am
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  2. Inactive

    Pseud – indeed. Actually, anyone paying any attention at all to World affairs could have predicted these future events. It hardly takes mystical powers, or hallucinogenic fumes seeping through the rocks of Delphi. 

    Mr Romney did also predict his share of the popular vote – 47%

    Well, not exactly, but close enough.

    • #2
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:05 am
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  3. Member

    On point #3, Romney needed to make the second-term warning a lot more often. He tended to frame it as a choice between “more of the same” and something better. Instead, he should have engaged in a little scaremongering — not hysterically, but reminding people why they voted as they did in 2010.

    Actually, the President’s non-diverse cabinet does surprise me, a little. I admit that I kind of thought he really believed that stuff.

    • #3
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:08 am
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  4. Member

    Supernatural? More like plain as the nose on one’s face to anyone not in the nose avoidance business.

    Come to think of it, maybe that’s the appropriate name for the media formerly known as mainstream: “the nose avoiding media.”

    • #4
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:24 am
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  5. Inactive

    I predict that my kids will try to get out of doing their schoolwork. Now watch me bend a spoon with my mind!

    • #5
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:29 am
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  6. Member

    That these are seen as predictions is telling, I think. Reality-avoidance was the key to Obama’s election and re-election, IMHO. That, and blaming others for anything/everything.

    • #6
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:36 am
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  7. Member

    Bah! Enough of dwelling on what may have been. Romney lost! That makes him and all his associates losers. I don’t care what losers think or said. His augury did not give him the clairvoyance to win so what use is it to us?

    • #7
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:45 am
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  8. Reagan
    Rob Long: Over at Bizpacreview.com — Eerie, no? I’ve got the shivers from this. I’m not sure, actually, that I’d really want someone with such spooky supernatural powers to be in the Oval Office. · · 1 hour ago

    Rob,

    You did not get someone with spooky supernatural powers. It seems we cannot elect someone who is basically an competent (business wise) decent boy scout type. We get what we deserve, the strawman slayer.

    • #8
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:47 am
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  9. Inactive

    “Ignorance is bliss.” – The Low-Information Voter

    • #9
    • January 24, 2013 at 11:59 am
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  10. Inactive

    First, Chris Matthews got tingles up his leg from Obama. Now, Rob gets shivers from Romney. 

    I was nauseated by Hillary’s testimony. Does that count?

    • #10
    • January 25, 2013 at 1:51 am
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  11. Member

    If only he could have seen that Candy Crowley setup coming.

    • #11
    • January 25, 2013 at 1:55 am
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  12. Inactive
    RCE

    I’d rather 100% of Romney’s predictions came true than 1% of Steyn’s.

    • #12
    • January 25, 2013 at 2:50 am
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  13. Member

    Umm… Rob was being sarcastic in his admiration of Romney’s clairvoyant powers. Pretty sure… right, Rob?

    • #13
    • January 25, 2013 at 3:18 am
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  14. Inactive
    NewRabble: First, Chris Matthews got tingles up his leg from Obama. Now, Rob gets shivers from Romney. 

    I was nauseated by Hillary’s testimony. Does that count? · 2 hours ago

    It feels worse than that . I t feels, or smells , like Chris Matthews voted maybe 3 million times.

    • #14
    • January 25, 2013 at 4:22 am
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  15. Member

    I remember Romney’s references to Mali in the foreign policy debate. It was that right after the debate that Mr. Krauthammer moaned about all the times Mali was mentioned, “If I hear Mali one more time”. It struck me odd that he would be so dismissive. But, honestly, how many of us heard of the potential of problems coming from Mali? I’m guessing not many. On this, kudos to Romney.

    In the meantime, we’re stuck with, apparently, the lord of the flies.

    • #15
    • January 25, 2013 at 5:45 am
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  16. Thatcher
    3rd angle projection: I remember Romney’s references to Mali in the foreign policy debate. It was that right after the debate that Mr. Krauthammer moaned about all the times Mali was mentioned, “If I hear Mali one more time”. It struck me odd that he would be so dismissive. But, honestly, how many of us heard of the potential of problems coming from Mali? I’m guessing not many. On this, kudos to Romney.

    In the meantime, we’re stuck with, apparently, the lord of the flies. · 53 minutes ago

    We’re only to be Citizens of the World when it’s convenient for politicians, it seems.

    Ask EU members. They might have an idea of what that really means.

    • #16
    • January 25, 2013 at 6:41 am
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  17. Inactive
    3rd angle projection: I remember Romney’s references to Mali in the foreign policy debate. It was that right after the debate that Mr. Krauthammer moaned about all the times Mali was mentioned, “If I hear Mali one more time”. It struck me odd that he would be so dismissive. But, honestly, how many of us heard of the potential of problems coming from Mali? I’m guessing not many. On this, kudos to Romney.

    In the meantime, we’re stuck with, apparently, the lord of the flies. · 1 hour ago

    I was pleasantly surprised at the time because The Economist had been running a series of reports about Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb activity in Mali for several weeks prior. It was surprising how much flak Romney got for something that was known to anyone who took the time to read about it.

    • #17
    • January 25, 2013 at 6:53 am
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  18. Inactive

    As someone commented to the Glenn, Romney is more like Cassandra then Nostradamus: cursed never to be believed.

    • #18
    • January 25, 2013 at 7:03 am
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  19. Member

    Good to hear about The Economist. I had given it up because of their fawning coverage of our Dear Leader. I do miss reading it for all the events happening worldwide. I thought they always did a good job of that.

    Whiskey Sam
    3rd angle projection: I remember Romney’s references to Mali in the foreign policy debate. It was that right after the debate that Mr. Krauthammer moaned about all the times Mali was mentioned, “If I hear Mali one more time”. It struck me odd that he would be so dismissive. But, honestly, how many of us heard of the potential of problems coming from Mali? I’m guessing not many. On this, kudos to Romney.

    In the meantime, we’re stuck with, apparently, the lord of the flies. · 1 hour ago

    I was pleasantly surprised at the time because The Economist had been running a series of reports about Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb activity in Mali for several weeks prior. It was surprising how much flak Romney got for something that was known to anyone who took the time to read about it. · 1 hour ago

    • #19
    • January 25, 2013 at 8:13 am
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  20. Member

    Living in San Francisco you get a lot of, “I’m a citizen of the world”. Somebody said that to me once and I asked, ” Can I see your I.D.?” That didn’t go over so well.

    Chris Campion
    3rd angle projection: I remember Romney’s references to Mali in the foreign policy debate. It was that right after the debate that Mr. Krauthammer moaned about all the times Mali was mentioned, “If I hear Mali one more time”. It struck me odd that he would be so dismissive. But, honestly, how many of us heard of the potential of problems coming from Mali? I’m guessing not many. On this, kudos to Romney.

    In the meantime, we’re stuck with, apparently, the lord of the flies. · 53 minutes ago

    We’re only to be Citizens of the World when it’s convenient for politicians, it seems.

    Ask EU members. They might have an idea of what that really means. · 1 hour ago

    • #20
    • January 25, 2013 at 8:16 am
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  21. Inactive
    3rd angle projection: Good to hear aboutThe Economist. I had given it up because of their fawning coverage of our Dear Leader. I do miss reading it for all the events happening worldwide. I thought they always did a good job of that.
    Whiskey Sam

    I was pleasantly surprised at the time because The Economist had been running a series of reports about Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb activity in Mali for several weeks prior. It was surprising how much flak Romney got for something that was known to anyone who took the time to read about it. · 1 hour ago

    8 minutes ago

    I read it in spite of their US coverage. It’s abysmal. Their international coverage is still pretty good, though.

    • #21
    • January 25, 2013 at 8:53 am
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  22. Member

    Thanks Whiskey. I’ll give it a 2nd look.

    Whiskey Sam
    3rd angle projection: Good to hear aboutThe Economist. I had given it up because of their fawning coverage of our Dear Leader. I do miss reading it for all the events happening worldwide. I thought they always did a good job of that.
    Whiskey Sam

    I was pleasantly surprised at the time because The Economist had been running a series of reports about Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb activity in Mali for several weeks prior. It was surprising how much flak Romney got for something that was known to anyone who took the time to read about it. · 1 hour ago

    8 minutes ago

    I read it in spite of their US coverage. It’s abysmal. Their international coverage is still pretty good, though. · 21 minutes ago

    • #22
    • January 25, 2013 at 11:39 am
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  23. Member

    Obama to the American people: “You lost”

    • #23
    • January 25, 2013 at 12:22 pm
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  24. Member

    Where are the women? As represented by Hillary, especially in her recent testimony, they are lying dissemblers not worthy of public office. A performance lauded by a lazy and corrupt press. Of course, this is more representative of Obama appointees than women. She is not fit to polish the boots of a Bachmann or a Palin, or even a Radtke, the most important challenger to George Allen in the Virginia senate primary. A genuine policy wonk with hard principles and reverence for the Constitution. The Democrats put forth their worst in 2007, pity the GOP has done little better.

    • #24
    • January 25, 2013 at 12:26 pm
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  25. Moderator
    Whiskey Sam
    3rd angle projection: Good to hear aboutThe Economist. I had given it up because of their fawning coverage of our Dear Leader. I do miss reading it for all the events happening worldwide. I thought they always did a good job of that.

    I read it in spite of their US coverage. It’s abysmal. Their international coverage is still pretty good, though. ·

    Sorry for the late response, but I cannot recommend strongly enough against this. Read the economist for news of what’s happening within a couple of miles of the Economist’s office. If you need the Economist to tell you where there are foreign controversies of note, then, fine, read their table of contents, but get the actual stories from almost any other site.

    Although it can be entertaining in its errors (the last copy I looked at was thrown down by Mrs. Of England when she saw a 1912 Catholic Encyclopedia article being used to demonstrate that Vatican II had not penetrated all corners of the Church), I’ve known no news source be so consistently wrong, including on obscure foreign news. They have good lines, but poor facts, like a Peggy Noonan magazine.

    • #25
    • January 27, 2013 at 11:30 am
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