Faltering Brands: BlackBerry, Goldman Sachs, Nokia, Moet et Chandon, and Yahoo

Some brands seem bulletproof, like Coca-Cola and Apple. Some, this past year especially, seem snakebit. From CNBC:

Once again, Coca-Cola was ranked the most valuable brand in the world, according to Interbrand, one of the nation’s top global brands experts. 

  1. kgrant67

    Yahoo.  I am pretty sure I read an article like this in about 2001 that was lamenting Yahoo in this same fashion.  They have got to be second from bottom only to AOL in brand value.  I haven’t purposely looked at a yahoo page in years.  I really wish they’d die already.  

  2. Troy Senik, Ed.
    C
    kgrant67: Yahoo.  I am pretty sure I read an article like this in about 2001 that was lamenting Yahoo in this same fashion.  They have got to be second from bottom only to AOL in brand value.  I haven’t purposely looked at a yahoo page in years.  I really wish they’d die already.   · 2 minutes ago

    I haven’t understood that company for a long while either, but it’s worth noting that Yahoo! Sports does some pretty strong reporting and is still somewhat respected in that slice of the media. That’s obviously not enough to keep the company going, but that’s one area where they’re not an unmitigated failure.

  3. Illiniguy

    I’m going to bet that Moet will be a pretty big seller on the first Tuesday in November.

  4. captainpower

    Apparently, Yahoo Finance is pretty good too, from what I hear.

    Google even hired their head to try to have Google Finance overtake them, but failed.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/google-finance-yahoo-finance-2012-8

    http://gigaom.com/2006/03/21/google-finance-needs-some-muscle/

  5. David Ward

    I have a personal stake, albeit a small one, in seeing RIM’s share price improve, so I encourage everyone to buy a new Blackberry now, and when the 10 series phones finally come to market.

    I’d also like to see public sector wages cut a la Goldman Sachs. In my part of the world (Alberta, Canada) we seem to have endless scandals of over-compensated health bureaucrats. It seems to me that a 14% across the board cut would instill some accountability, if only from the bottom up, in the huge public health-care system.

  6. Mr. Dart

    Others in the Top 10 losers in the Interbrands 2012 study upon which the CNBC article was based: Citi, MTV, Honda, Thomson Reuters, and Dell.  Honda wouldn’t have sprung to mind but they were ranked as the 8th biggest loser in brand value for 2012.  Honda is still the 21st most valuable brand in the world however.

    The Top 10 most valuable brands in the world (according to the Interbrand study) are, from 1 to 10:

    Coca-Cola, Apple, IBM, Google, Microsoft, GE, McDonalds, Intel, Samsung, Toyota.

  7. Mr. Dart
    captainpower: Apparently, Yahoo Finance is pretty good too, from what I hear.

    Google even hired their head to try to have Google Finance overtake them, but failed.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/google-finance-yahoo-finance-2012-8

    http://gigaom.com/2006/03/21/google-finance-needs-some-muscle/ · 8 minutes ago

    Yes, and Yahoo hired Google’s Marissa Mayer as their new CEO. 

    Yahoo is the 4th largest site on the Internet.  There’s a great deal of underutilized value at a company that attracts millions of visitors daily.

  8. Joseph Stanko
    Rob Long: 

    When super rich folks like Goldman bankers realize how loathed they are, they take action. And when the super rich “take action,” it almost always involves spending money. So look for a stately increase in the number of Goldman-sponsored cultural doo-dads, Goldman-sponsored educational thing-a-ma-jigs, and Goldman sponsored kids-playing-outside initiatives. 

    Rob, you’re right about the spending money part, but wrong about what they are spending it on.  From the WSJ:

    Goldman Sachs has made a 180 degree turn on President Barack Obama.

    This election, Goldman employees have given just $136,000 to Obama, down from $1 million, the WSJ reported today. The Wall Street’s firm’s employees aren’t just withholding money from Obama, they are giving money to his challenger. Goldman employees have given Mitt Romney’s campaign $900,000, plus another $900,000 to the super PAC founded to help him.

    In the four decades since Congress created the campaign-finance system, no company’s employees have switched sides so abruptly.

    These folks are smart enough to identify the true source of all that loathing, and plan to do something about it.

  9. tabula rasa

    Rob:  I agree with you about Amazon.  Its website is my favorite commercial site, and they’ve carefully expanded beyond books.  I don’t know if they created or purchased Audible, but it’s a perfect fit.

    The customer service is excellent.

  10. RightinChicago

    I have a Kindle Fire (the old one) and I really like it a lot. It even fits in some of my back pockets. Amazon has great music and book content. The Kindle Prime option is great. For $80 a year, you get free shipping and free video streaming (not brand new movies and TV but a good selection). The Cloud Drive is great. 7 GB free that allow streaming to 10 different devices. I’m not surprised the brand is doing so well

  11. genferei

    Interbrand has done a fabulous job over the last couple of decades of, first, creating the idea of ‘brand value’ out of whole cloth, and then consistently creating PR for themselves by releasing these rankings. Not to mention the vast fees they get for creating and re-imagining brands for corporate managers who want to see their companies ‘rise’.

    So here’s an idea: an annual Ricochet ‘Conservative [Political] Brand’ ranking. Rob and Peter can just make it up, but get Groseclose, Schaeffer and Wilson on board so you can make up some stuff about proprietary methodologies, if necessary. Then every year you can ask people to propose names of politicians, consultants, media folks, groups, think tanks, whatever for the list. Imagine the conversations around whether Rick Perry is a stronger conservative brand than Clint Eastwood in 2012… And then unveil the list to rapturous media (and social media) coverage.

  12. 1967mustangman

    All this is about Apple is overlooking the fact that they went from a very popular brand to an almost bankrupt company back to the most valuable company in the world.  All because of one man who is no longer with us.  10 years from now we just might be saying “Whatever happened to Apple”  I was joking about buying Apple in 1997 as a young high school investor but I thought that $5 a share was overpriced…..oh well!

  13. FightinInPhilly

    An interesting exercise is to look at the “top” companies of any given era and observe how few make it into the next era. Not just the scandals (Enron, Worldcom) but smart, savvy companies that simply failed to evolve. And its not for lack of trying. Atari, Zenith, MCI, RCA, etc were all lauded as “geniuses” in one form or another, and a forests of trees were killed to create the new conventional wisdom. These days, you just kind of wonder what happened to them. It probably has a useful application in politics- what worked before cannot necessarily be applied to today. 

  14. Vance Richards

    What about the USA brand? I would think with our debt, combined with our financial and moral decline has made our nation’s name far less valuable.

    However, the Ricochet brand seems to be on the rebound. 

    (Sorry, that was bad)

  15. John Walker
    Rob Long:  The surprise to me is Goldman. Sure, they’re rapacious and unscrupulous investment bankers. But for decades they were unscrupulous and rapacious investment bankers beneath the radar. Now, they’re a brand. Like Coke or FedEx. But unlike those two, they’re despised…

    Goldman have been hæmorrhaging customers ever since Greg Smith’s op-ed in the New York Times disclosed that senior management there often referred to customers as “muppets”, upon whom the mistakes of the proprietary trading desk should be unloaded.

    Here is my own exit interview with Goldman’s senior Swiss management team.  Would anybody in their right mind entrust anything to these folks?

  16. Michael Minnott

    Whenever I hear the brand Moet et Chandon I can’t help but think of the classic Queen song Killer Queen:

    She keeps Moet et Chandon In her pretty cabinet ‘Let them eat cake’ she says Just like Marie Antoinette

    Ahhh, great song.

  17. ConservativeWanderer
    tabula rasa: Rob:  I agree with you about Amazon.  Its website is my favorite commercial site, and they’ve carefully expanded beyond books.  I don’t know if they created or purchased Audible, but it’s a perfect fit.

    The customer service is excellent. · 1 hour ago

    I believe they purchased them.

    I’m an Audible user from way back, and if memory serves — and it may not — it used to be an independent company.

    You’re right, though, it’s a perfect fit, and Amazon’s customer service is second to none.

    Now, if President Romney can hire Jeff Bezos to revamp government customer service… ;)

  18. Mr. Dart
    BlueAnt

     Amazon has transformed the entire marketplace for everything, to an extent only barely recognized by the public at large.  

    Recently a small mom & pop shop near us on the lake closed after 50 years of selling convenience store items and, importantly, fishing tackle and lures.  When asked if Bass Pro Shops, Wal-Mart, Gander Mountain etc. had done him in he said, “He(ck) no! They never bothered us.  In fact, they helped get people into fishin’. But we know what people need to fish the river and lake here so we were fine.  Nah, what killed our business was Amazon.  We can’t compete with Amazon. I reckon somebody will open a nail salon or barber shop here. Amazon ain’t figured out how to overnight manicures and haircuts yet.”

  19. ConservativeWanderer
    Terry

    BlueAnt

     

     Amazon has transformed the entire marketplace for everything, to an extent only barely recognized by the public at large.  

    Recently a small mom & pop shop near us on the lake closed after 50 years of selling convenience store items and, importantly, fishing tackle and lures.  When asked if Bass Pro Shops, Wal-Mart, Gander Mountain etc. had done him in he said, “He(ck) no! They never bothered us.  In fact, they helped get people into fishin’. But we know what people need to fish the river and lake here so we were fine.  Nah, what killed our business was Amazon.  We can’t compete with Amazon. I reckon somebody will open a nail salon or barber shop here. Amazon ain’t figured out how to overnight manicures and haircuts yet.” · 10 minutes ago

    The automatic elevator decimated the elevator operator profession.

    The automobile destroyed the buggy whip industry.

    That’s not necessarily a bad thing. It just means that people and businesses need to learn to adapt to changing situations. Those that don’t, fail.

  20. Frederick Key

    Rebranding is the key. Silverman-Baggs. Or more likely Sachmo. Or GoldSax.

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