Christopher Dorner Is Dead

 

Good.

Earlier today, as news was breaking that San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputies had surrounded a mountain cabin where Christopher Dorner was believed to be holed up, the media spokesman for the Los Angeles Police Department, Commander Andrew Smith, was holding a previously scheduled press conference. “Everyone is very hopeful,” he said, “that this thing ends without any further bloodshed . . . The best thing for him now would be to surrender and allow us to take him into custody and he can face the criminal justice system.”

Commander Smith is a good man and is well respected in the department, but I disagree. In his position he has to say such things for public consumption, but surely he knew that cops everywhere were hoping that Dorner would meet his end right then and there, preferably from a cop’s bullet.

And now, though the body has yet to be identified, that’s apparently what has happened. We are now spared the vulgar carnival that would have attended Dorner’s prosecution had he been taken alive. Yes, even here in California he would have been given a death sentence, but he would have lived to old age on Death Row, all the while finding satisfaction in seeing the Crazy Left turn him into a folk hero along the lines of Mumia Abu Jamal.

The only lamentable thing about today is that Dorner claimed another life, that of a man far, far better than he was. In a few days or weeks, no one will be talking about Dorner anymore, which is as it should be. 

Perhaps the fire that consumed him in this life was but a preview of what awaits him in the next.

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Members have made 75 comments.

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  1. Profile photo of Dudley Inactive
    And reporters on Fox News today were saying the firefighters were ordered to watch the cabin burn. Even if it was for their own safety, I expect some shouting about that. · 3 hours ago

    I hope he died in the fire and not by his own hand, the coward’s way. True justice would have been served had the police killed him outright but I suppose this will have to suffice.

    • #1
    • February 13, 2013 at 3:06 am
  2. Profile photo of Skyler Member

    Let’s hope they burned the right man to death. All those cabins look alike, having roofs and walls and such. And he had to be burned to death because killing a cop is much worse than killing any other person. I don’t know much about this man or what he did, but the keystone cops idiocy has me less than confident that this was the most appropriate ending for a man who accuses the police of wrongdoing and then goes on the run. I’m sure he may have been a bad man, but I would prefer a jury to decide that, not a bunch of trigger happy, torch bearing cops.

    • #2
    • February 13, 2013 at 4:58 am
  3. Profile photo of E. Blackadder Inactive

    When an officer kills someone in cold blood executing a botched raid, it’s “Proper procedures were followed.” When someone kills an officer, it’s “Burn ’em with fire”, and “Oh, that wasn’t him? Oops, here’s a truck.”

    [Redacted for CoC]

    • #3
    • February 13, 2013 at 5:47 am
  4. Profile photo of Tommy De Seno Contributor

    I’m not comfortable mixing “police officer” and “revenge.”

    I understand they are human, but part of the professionalism is to not mix those things.

    The problem is when it trickles down. Who cares about Dorner – but what about a police officer motivated by revenge against lesser criminals?

    • #4
    • February 13, 2013 at 6:12 am
  5. Profile photo of Mollie Hemingway Contributor
    Tommy De Seno: I’m not comfortable mixing “police officer” and “revenge.”

    I understand they are human, but part of the professionalism is to not mix those things.

    The problem is when it trickles down. Who cares about Dorner – but what about a police officer motivated by revenge against lesser criminals? · 50 minutes ago

    Agreed. I understand that this became very personal for many police officers, but I would hope that they would focus on justice rather than revenge.

    • #5
    • February 13, 2013 at 7:18 am
  6. Profile photo of Whiskey Sam Inactive
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.
    Tommy De Seno: I’m not comfortable mixing “police officer” and “revenge.”

    I understand they are human, but part of the professionalism is to not mix those things.

    The problem is when it trickles down. Who cares about Dorner – but what about a police officer motivated by revenge against lesser criminals? · 50 minutes ago

    Agreed. I understand that this became very personal for many police officers, but I would hope that they would focus on justice rather than revenge. · 40 minutes ago

    We wouldn’t have to worry about it as much if our legal system was more concerned with providing justice to the victims than protecting criminals’ rights.

    • #6
    • February 13, 2013 at 8:07 am
  7. Profile photo of Skyler Member
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.

    Agreed. I understand that this became very personal for many police officers, but I would hope that they would focus on justice rather than revenge. 

    Police aren’t supposed to do “justice.” They’re supposed to follow procedures and laws. Courts don’t do “justice,” they’re supposed to do the law. That’s what a nation of laws is supposed to be.

    I just heard police screaming to burn the cabin down. That is outrageous. Dorner’s estate should sue the city and destroy the police department. Maybe then it can be rebuilt. They have shamed this country long enough.

    • #7
    • February 13, 2013 at 8:25 am
  8. Profile photo of Nobody Inactive

    I am pretty sure this comment violates the Ricochet Code of Conduct.

    E. Blackadder:

    [Redacted due to CoC Violation] · 2 hours ago

    • #8
    • February 13, 2013 at 9:08 am
  9. Profile photo of PHenry Member
    E. Blackadder: [Redacted due to CoC violation] · 3 hours ago
    I have read Jack Dunphy’s stuff for years, I usually agree with him, sometimes disagree, and wrote a rather critical comment to a recent post on this same issue. Your comment is over the line. He is a valuable resource showing an insider’s view of the goings on in the LAPD and we are lucky to have his perspective. He is due respect, even if you disagree with him. I consider him a good man and he seems to be a good cop, a dangerous and often thankless job being done by some of the best among us. I , too am horrified by the street justice he seems to be advocating, so lets have a reasonable conversation with him about it, instead of condemning him for expressing his perspective.
    • #9
    • February 13, 2013 at 9:27 am
  10. Profile photo of Tom Meyer, Ed. Editor
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.

    Agreed. I understand that this became very personal for many police officers, but I would hope that they would focus on justice rather than revenge.

    Also agreed.

    It’s incontrovertible that Dorner was a horrible person; even if one assumes the friendliest interpretation possible of the story of his firing, that can in no way excuse the evil he’s done in the last week. And I, too, am glad we’ve been spared the continuation of the perverse hagiography that had already begun.

    Regardless, it’s more than a little unsettling to see a police officer express sanguine pleasure at a man’s death by fire and imply that the murders of police officers are greater crimes than the murder of others.

    • #10
    • February 13, 2013 at 9:44 am
  11. Profile photo of Nobody Inactive

    I don’t hear any advocacy of street justice.

    Advocacy of street justice is “let’s not follow the law,” not “I’m happy the bad guy got killed by cops who were following the law.” If the latter is in your definition of “street justice,” you’re using the term to denigrate behavior that is within the law.

    I’m no expert on police work, but, based on what Dorner has said and done, I think it is very unlikely he could have been captured rather than killed–because of his own apparent willingness to violently resist.

    From the very beginning I was sure this was going to end with a violent death for him. And good riddance. The last thing this country needs is another Mumia.

    PHenry

    I , too am horrified by the street justice he seems to be advocating, so lets have a reasonable conversation with him about it, instead of condemning him for expressing his perspective. · 8 minutes ago

    • #11
    • February 13, 2013 at 9:54 am
  12. Profile photo of Aaron Miller Member

    I’m glad he’s dead.

    But how likely is a controversy-motivated investigation into the fire? When I heard about the tear gas and then the fire, my mind immediately went to the controversial FBI raid in Waco.

    And reporters on Fox News today were saying the firefighters were ordered to watch the cabin burn. Even if it was for their own safety, I expect some shouting about that.

    • #13
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:21 am
  13. Profile photo of kylez Member

    I agree. I was telling my parents that it would be a great message if he were captured, tried and executed, but only if the execution happened quickly, which it wouldn’t. 

    Perhaps you remember the Toolbox Killers of the late seventies/early eighties. The leader of the duo, a man sentenced to death 25 years ago is still alive.

    • #14
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:33 am
  14. Profile photo of notmarx Member

    If the Justice System more surely did justice, Commander Smith’s statement would have been the simple truth and not an obvious lie.

    • #15
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:35 am
  15. Profile photo of Skyler Member

    Purple, the cops were on audio recording, screaming that they were going to burn the house down with him inside. That is street justice.

    • #16
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:36 am
  16. Profile photo of PHenry Member
    Purplestrife: I don’t hear any advocacy of street justice.

    Advocacy of street justice is “let’s not follow the law,” not “I’m happy the bad guy got killed by cops who were following the law.” .

     

    36 minutes ago

    Well, I’m not passing a judgment on what happened, I just don’t have enough evidence for that. But I consider it a dangerous and slippery slope when police decide that taking someone alive is not the goal.

    From the post:  cops everywhere were hoping that Dorner would meet his end right then and there, preferably from a cop’s bulletAdd to that the two incidents of Torrence police shooting up citizens ‘by mistake’, and it sure looks like they were out for blood, not justice.
    • #17
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:43 am
  17. Profile photo of SpatialD Inactive

    The fact that this situation was “abruptly ended” leaves me thinking that perhaps the lack of a public trial and “discourse” (ugh!) has left luffing the sails of a great many who would turn this into some sort of “cause de celebre”. The liberal media will do it’s best to keep the story on life support but thankfully, I believe, the story’s shelf life has (hopefully) been cut in half.

    • #18
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:44 am
  18. Profile photo of Nobody Inactive

    So what?

    What matters here is whether they followed the law and good police practices–not whether they hated him and wanted to see him suffer for his evil deeds.

    The law does not demand that cops have hearts purified of all rage and resentment against a man who wants to murder them.

    If your complaint is that something that is perfectly legal is “street justice”–good luck with that.

    In that case, “street justice” refers to attitudes that make you uncomfortable, not behavior that violates any norms society takes seriously enough to enforce them.

    Skyler: Purple, the cops were on audio recording, screaming that they were going to burn the house down with him inside. That is street justice. · 0 minutes ago
    • #19
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:45 am
  19. Profile photo of Skyler Member

    Perfectly legal? To burn a man inside a house? Really? Seriously? That’s what you’re saying?

    • #20
    • February 13, 2013 at 10:54 am
  20. Profile photo of Nobody Inactive

    What I am saying is whether it is legal or not is the relevant question–not whether some of the cops were motivated by rage.

    Some of you seem to be engaging in scrutiny of the hearts of some of the police involved in this matter. I refuse to do that.

    If the police had a perfectly legitimate tactical reason for setting the house on fire–or doing something that would have the predictable consequence of setting the house on fire–what does it matter if some of the cops also wanted him to suffer a painful end?

    Skyler: Perfectly legal? To burn a man inside a house? Really? Seriously? That’s what you’re saying? · 2 minutes ago
    • #21
    • February 13, 2013 at 11:02 am
  21. Profile photo of Tom Meyer, Ed. Editor
    Purplestrife: So what?

    What matters here is whether they followed the law and good police practices–not whether they hated him and wanted to see him suffer for his evil deeds.

    Yes, though the two can easily be at odds with each other. As Skyler said, the incident in Torrance — where police shot two women (one in the back) who were driving a similar vehicle to Dorner’s — is enough to make one suspect the LAPD wanted Dorner dead. The circumstances of his death, coupled with the kind of attitude Dunphy expressed here, add credence to that argument, though we will have to see.

    Regardless, I’m willing to cut law enforcement some slack on this, given Dorner’s ruthless and murderous behavior over the last few days.

    • #22
    • February 13, 2013 at 11:05 am
  22. Profile photo of PHenry Member

    Some of you seem to be engaging in scrutiny of the hearts of some of the police involved in this matter…what does it matter if some of the cops also wanted him to suffer a painful end?

    Execution without due process, for one. Cruel and inhumane punishment for another. I don’t weep for Dorner. I don’t care about his painful end, specifically. I just know that once you allow police to decide who deserves to die without a fair trial, you end up with Judge Dread. Dorner was not going to be taken alive, and it wasn’t worth endangering any more law enforcement officers for his worthless sake. My objection wasn’t with how Dorner died, but with the open proclamation that cops wanted to be the ones who killed him. They should regret any time they are forced to kill anyone, no matter what their crimes. 

    • #23
    • February 13, 2013 at 11:13 am
  23. Profile photo of Nobody Inactive

    I could not disagree more strongly.

    I find nothing objectively compelling about regretting a justified kill.

    PHenry: They should regret any time they are forced to kill anyone, no matter what their crimes. · 3 minutes ago
    • #24
    • February 13, 2013 at 11:25 am
  24. Profile photo of Tom Meyer, Ed. Editor
    Purplestrife: I could not disagree more strongly.

    I find nothing objectively compelling about regretting a justified kill.

    Stipulating that there’s not a lot of information about what happened at Big Bear — the SBC Sheriff Deputies may deserve only our commendation — I have a serious problem with using that kind of language to describe law enforcement.

    Officers are hired to enforce the law and protect the peace; sometimes, this requires them to use deadly force to protect themselves and their citizens, but that is a far, far cry from saying they’re empowered to make “justified kills.”

    • #25
    • February 13, 2013 at 11:46 am
  25. Profile photo of Skyler Member
    Purplestrife: I could not disagree more strongly.

    I find nothing objectively compelling about regretting a justified kill. · 11 minutes ago

    PHenry: They should regret any time they are forced to kill anyone, no matter what their crimes. · 3 minutes ago

    I don’t want them to have to regret anything. However, like Tom said above, their previous behavior, combined with the lust for burning him that is clear in their voices on the audio make me suspect that they were not interested in law. They wanted revenge, law be damned.

    I’m no conspiracist, and I haven’t followed a lot of what Dorner is alleged to have done, but the bits I’ve seen are that he was a whistle blower, however rational or not, and that makes me wonder at the execution that they clearly had planned for him.

    And it makes me suspicious that any complaints he had about the police department were probably credible.

    The LAPD has not looked good for a long time, there’s no reason to think that they are wonders of integrity now.

    • #26
    • February 13, 2013 at 11:52 am
  26. Profile photo of Tommy De Seno Contributor
    Purplestrife: I could not disagree more strongly.

    I find nothing objectively compelling about regretting a justified kill. · 26 minutes ago

    PHenry: They should regret any time they are forced to kill anyone, no matter what their crimes. · 3 minutes ago

    One can at least admit the situation is regrettable without sacrificing bravado.

    • #27
    • February 13, 2013 at 11:54 am
  27. Profile photo of Tom Meyer, Ed. Editor
    PHenry: 

    I don’t think its off topic at all. Jack saidcops everywhere were hoping that Dorner would meet his end right then and there,preferably from a cop’s bullet.

    So the question is, should cops ever prefer to kill a suspect rather then apprehend them? I’m not saying they should hesitate to kill when they have to, to protect themselves or innocents, just that they shouldn’t have killing as their preferred outcome. It perverts the whole meaning of a law enforcement officer. And it opens the door for abuse of the worst sort.

    Well said.

    • #28
    • February 14, 2013 at 1:01 am
  28. Profile photo of Roberto Inactive
    PHenry: I’m not saying they should hesitate to kill when they have to, to protect themselves or innocents, just that they shouldn’t have killing as their preferred outcome. It perverts the whole meaning of a law enforcement officer. And it opens the door for abuse of the worst sort.

    Not so much abuse but just plain recklessness. Consider the situation that evolved in Cleveland:

    A November car chase ended in a “full blown-out” firefight, with glass and bullets flying, according to Cleveland police officers who described for investigators the chaotic scene at the end of the deadly 25-minute pursuit.

    But when the smoky haze — caused by rapid fire of nearly 140 bullets in less than 30 seconds — dissipated, it soon became clear that more than a dozen officers had been firing at one another across a middle school parking lot in East Cleveland.

    That Dorner met his end in the manner he did is not worth a tear but a “take no prisoners” attitude can easily have far more disastrous consequences.

    • #29
    • February 14, 2013 at 1:11 am
  29. Profile photo of Nobody Inactive

    No. I don’t care whether they revel in the killing of suspects when the killing is justified. What I care about is whether they follow the law.

    PHenry

    All I said was that a policeman should feel regret for any situation where he is forced to kill anyone. You instead want them to revel in the killing of suspects, as long as they can justify it? That is not the kind of person I want on the force… · 54 minutes ago

    • #30
    • February 14, 2013 at 1:22 am
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