A Campaign Starting and Ending with Jobs

 

As soon as former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney lost Tuesday night, the usual search for campaign scapegoats began. Fortunately, at least, one man will stand up for the campaign’s staffers, and that is the candidate himself. Instead of searching for blame, Romney has begun searching for jobs for the 400 staffers who devoted a year of their lives to his presidential pursuit.

According to The Washington Post, Romney thought of his staffers’ futures before his own.

…Romney, those close to him said, is not second guessing the counsel or work of his staff. After he spoke at Wednesday’s breakfast, Simmons said he spoke privately with Romney.

“I said, ‘So what are you going to do for the next few weeks? Let’s do something fun,’ ” Simmons recalled. “And he said, ‘Uh, I’m going to be really busy.’ He said, ‘I have 400 people to get great jobs for.’ ”

The candidate who understood how jobs are created will now help his aides find new ones. For Romney, a long campaign ends with disappointment but not without dignity.

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Members have made 27 comments.

  1. Profile photo of Jim Chase Member

    Sounds like the losing candidate will be more focused on jobs than the winning candidate.

    • #1
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:24 am
  2. Profile photo of AIG Member
    AIG

    Apparently these are the traits that the majority of us consider “un-cool”, certainly not as cool as going golfing. I’ve thought, since Tuesday, that this wasn’t Romney’s fault. Romney was the right guy. It was us. 

    • #2
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:33 am
  3. Profile photo of Frozen Chosen Thatcher

    Clearly America – or at least the blue portion – was not worthy of such a leader.

    Let’s see what the “cool community organizer” can do for them…

    • #3
    • November 10, 2012 at 2:54 am
  4. Profile photo of Astonishing Inactive

    Dignfied? I guess. But there is rich irony. Is it dignified or humiliating, or both, that the man who said he would put the country to work ends up looking for work for his own workers, that the “jobs” guy didn’t get the job done?

    Bill Kristol was right about Romney’s one-dimensional campaign: When your opponent accuses you of making war on women, you must answer that specific accusation, and chanting “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent accuses you of hating the poor, you must answer that specific accusation, and “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent says you are “not one of us,” chanting “jobs” is not an effective response.

    Not only did Romney lose the election, he also caused conservatives to lose ground on every issue, from foreign policy to heathcare, because he lacked the courage to engage in a real debate to defend conservative positions on anything except jobs.

    Apparently “jobs” is not the only thing Americans care about.

    • #4
    • November 10, 2012 at 3:20 am
  5. Profile photo of tabula rasa Member
    Astonishing: Dignfied? I guess. But there is rich irony. Is it dignified or humiliating, or both, that the man who said he would put the country to work ends up looking for work for his own workers, that the “jobs” guy didn’t get the job done?

    So which conservative would have defeated Obama?

    Your suggestion that Mitt should feel humiliated because he’s going to help his employees find good jobs is one of the strangest, most tone-deaf comments I’ve seen on Ricochet.

    • #5
    • November 10, 2012 at 3:32 am
  6. Profile photo of Diaryof1 Inactive
    Astonishing: Dignfied? I guess. But there is rich irony. Is it dignified or humiliating, or both, that the man who said he would put the country to work ends up looking for work for his own workers, that the “jobs” guy didn’t get the job done?

    Astonishing, I am astonished! The answer to your question is overwhelmingly “dignified.” Romney is not humiliating, he is humble. This is the people’s problem. You cannot undo in one election season decades of free living, gluttony, self-absorption, total lack of discernment in allowing MSM to instruct your daily life and consciousness, and simply a long, slow drift away from solid grounding in faith, character, responsibility. This is a long game.

    • #6
    • November 10, 2012 at 3:36 am
  7. Profile photo of Indaba Member
    AIG: Apparently these are the traits that the majority of us consider “un-cool”, certainly not as cool as going golfing. I’ve thought, since Tuesday, that this wasn’t Romney’s fault. Romney was the right guy. It was us. · 1 hour ago

    This brought tears to my eyes.

    What a story – wonder if CNN will cover this?

    • #7
    • November 10, 2012 at 4:16 am
  8. Profile photo of AIG Member
    AIG

    When your opponent accuses you of making war on women, you must answer that specific accusation

    I don’t know if you’re right or wrong, but there’s something to be said about not going down to the level of the Dems. I’m not sure if I want to win, if it means becoming like them. That would be worst than loosing. 

    • #8
    • November 10, 2012 at 4:17 am
  9. Profile photo of wmartin Inactive
    Astonishing:

    Bill Kristol was right about Romney’s one-dimensional campaign: When your opponent accuses you of making war on women, you must answer that specific accusation, and chanting “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent accuses you of hating the poor, you must answer that specific accusation, and “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent says you are “not one of us,” chanting “jobs” is not an effective response.

    I would be happy to go a very long while without hearing from Bill Kristol again. We have had enough of his wise counsel for now.

    • #9
    • November 10, 2012 at 4:19 am
  10. Profile photo of Indaba Member
    AIG

    When your opponent accuses you of making war on women, you must answer that specific accusation

    I don’t know if you’re right or wrong, but there’s something to be said about not going down to the level of the Dems. I’m not sure if I want to win, if it means becoming like them. That would be worst than loosing. · 18 minutes ago

    Attack ads work. Ignore their rubbish on war with woman. Did you know Romney’s mother (or grandmother) ran for government? A great response would have been, “I grew up with strong women. Did you know my mother ran for government office? She was a role model for me. She would be disgusted at President Obama for trying to score cheap points with such appalling language. She would say that war is a very serious word. To throw it around like confetti, so lightly, is appalling. She would say that anyone who uses cheap shots like this is not suitable for the office of President.”

    Women like personalized stories about family life. Notice that his dead grandmother says the mean things.

    Collective Bargaining 101 – say “other people think you are a loser.”

    • #10
    • November 10, 2012 at 4:42 am
  11. Profile photo of Ed G. Inactive
    tabula rasa
    Astonishing: Dignfied? I guess. But there is rich irony. Is it dignified or humiliating, or both, that the man who said he would put the country to work ends up looking for work for his own workers, that the “jobs” guy didn’t get the job done?

    So which conservative would have defeated Obama?

    …..

    The one that would have effectively responded to Obama’s framing and made arguments beyond “jobs”. The one that would have made a case for conservative positions on both pragmatic and emotional/value-based terms. The one that would have done a better job of framing Obama as incompetent, ineffective, out of touch, ideological over realistic, etc. The one that could have used all of Obama’s record to make the case rather than having to pull back on some of the important points.

    Romney is a good man, and I think his effort to help his staffers is dignified – so I part ways with Astonishing on that point. But I’m bitter because it seems that the criticisms that have been made all along of Romney in particular and a moderate strategy in general seem to have played a part in this loss.

    • #11
    • November 10, 2012 at 5:07 am
  12. Profile photo of Misthiocracy Member

    This illustrates what’s so maddening to me about all this – he almost certainly would have been a really good president.

    • #12
    • November 10, 2012 at 5:17 am
  13. Profile photo of AIG Member
    AIG

    Indaba I agree with you, on a theoretical level, but this implies that the people who are swayed by such pathetic tactics have the cognitive capacity to be swayed back by reasoned arguments. Unfortunately, I no longer have faith in the voters of this country. 

    • #13
    • November 10, 2012 at 5:49 am
  14. Profile photo of Red Feline Inactive
    Misthiocracy: This illustrates what’s so maddening to me about all this – he almost certainly would have been a really good president. 

    I think Romney would have made a good president too, Misthiocracy! His record shows that. 

    I think Romney ran a great campaign. If anything he was too dignified and civilized. I was disgusted watching Obama dancing up and down, shouting things like, “Romney is a liar,” and, Vote out of revenge”. What a contrast!

    My own thinking is leading me to think that what has changed is the way people live, the social environment. They NEED social programs because most people live in cities, and the old neighbourhood is no longer there. Families are often not there either because the members live in different cities. They are not around to help with the things that they used to do. Without social programs to help out, in times of need especially, most people would be in trouble. I know jobs are essential for the welfare of people, but perhaps more needed to be said about what the Republicans wanted to provide in the way of that help. 

    • #14
    • November 10, 2012 at 6:55 am
  15. Profile photo of William Laing Member

    A mensch

    • #15
    • November 10, 2012 at 7:00 am
  16. Profile photo of MJBubba Member

    So this nice story about Mitt Romney appeared in the Washington Post, safely after the election. I heard very affectionate praise for Romney from Ari Shapiro on NPR this morning. The mass media people who covered, attacked, undercut and dealt dirty as they served as an extension of the Obama campaign can now feel free to tell us what a nice guy they smeared all year, and he really isn’t the callous monster they made him out to be. Meh.

    • #16
    • November 10, 2012 at 7:18 am
  17. Profile photo of Francis S. Campbell Inactive

    I agree that undoubtably Romney is a good man who is a loyal and caring boss who truly wants to help his staff. Great, good for him. But how much better for us if he was a true core conservative that could have articulated to the nation what was at stake. Alas he is speaks the language of the right like a second language as he is and was not ideologically committed. He is just an experienced and excellent business man who ran on competency over ideology, just as one of his predecessors form Massachusetts did to the same fate. However, don’t get me wrong as far left this country has traveled since 1984 when Reagan carried 49 states even a great communicator like Reagan likely would loose today. But if we are to loose this Republic anyway as appears to be happening before our eyes, I for one would like to go down fighting for something greater then the sensibilities of soccer moms from Akron.

    • #17
    • November 10, 2012 at 7:45 am
  18. Profile photo of Tony Martyr Member

     To which their response will be:

    “Governor, that’s a very generous offer, and I’ll of course gratefully accept any assistance you can provide. But, to be honest, regardless of the outcome, I was expecting to have to go and find a job anyway. Because if the only reason I joined your campaign staff was to gain political preferment and a cushy government or party job after the election…well… I was kind of working for the wrong guy, wasn’t I?”

    • #18
    • November 10, 2012 at 7:49 am
  19. Profile photo of CreditMgr Inactive

    Where are “great jobs” found? Not in politically unconnected industries – think coal. And not in the politically connected because they depend on the whim of the Dear Leader. Not in expendable things, or companies servicing anyone connected to what people can do without, or find a cheaper substitute in a stalling economy.

    Romney could do all his backers a favor by saying where he sees great jobs in the economy we will get – not the specific companies, but industries and regions of the country, and skills required.

    • #19
    • November 10, 2012 at 8:34 am
  20. Profile photo of J. D. Fitzpatrick Member
    Indaba
    AIG

    When your opponent accuses you of making war on women, you must answer that specific accusation

    Attack ads work. Ignore their rubbish on war with woman. Did you know Romney’s mother (or grandmother) ran for government? A great response would have been, “I grew up with strong women. Did you know my mother ran for government office? She was a role model for me. She would be disgusted at President Obama for trying to score cheap points with such appalling language. She would say that war is a very serious word. To throw it around like confetti, so lightly, is appalling. She would say that anyone who uses cheap shots like this is not suitable for the office of President.”

    Women like personalized stories about family life. Notice that his dead grandmother says the mean things.

    Indaba, you’ve been giving some great advice for conservative campaigns the last few days. I hope some of the higher-ups take notice. 

    • #20
    • November 10, 2012 at 9:55 am
  21. Profile photo of Keith Preston Member
    wmartin
    Astonishing:

    Bill Kristol was right about Romney’s one-dimensional campaign: When your opponent accuses you of making war on women, you must answer that specific accusation, and chanting “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent accuses you of hating the poor, you must answer that specific accusation, and “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent says you are “not one of us,” chanting “jobs” is not an effective response.

    I would be happy to go a very long while without hearing from Bill Kristol again. We have had enough of his wise counsel for now. · 18 hours ago

    Add Laura Ingraham’s Mitt bashing to that list. I am unsubscribing from that harpy today. No wonder no man will marry her.

    • #21
    • November 10, 2012 at 10:22 am
  22. Profile photo of Brian McMenomy Member

    Is there something wrong with us simply noticing the contrast between the craven backbiting of the 2008 ticket (staffers, especially) and the dignified class of Gov. Romney?

    • #22
    • November 10, 2012 at 10:26 am
  23. Profile photo of Red Feline Inactive
    CreditMgr: Where are “great jobs” found? Not in politically unconnected industries – think coal. And not in the politically connected because they depend on the whim of the Dear Leader. Not in expendable things, or companies servicing anyone connected to what people can do without, or find a cheaper substitute in a stalling economy.

    Romney could do all his backers a favor by saying where he sees great jobs in the economy we will get – not the specific companies, but industries and regions of the country, and skills required. · 1 hour ago

    How about with government? That seems to be where the highest-paying jobs are, with all the benefits and large pensions.

    Hey, I am not saying this is good. 

    • #23
    • November 10, 2012 at 10:40 am
  24. Profile photo of Israel P. Member

    There is a story floating around Facebook that staffers had their credit cards cancelled the night of the election, and couldn’t even use them to get cabs home. Does someone have something definitive to debunk that. (I don’t believe it, of course, but I know a few people…)

    • #24
    • November 11, 2012 at 3:35 am
  25. Profile photo of Astonishing Inactive
    tabula rasa
    Astonishing: . . . Is it dignified or humiliating, or both, that the man who said he would put the country to work ends up looking for work for his own workers, that the “jobs” guy didn’t get the job done?

     . . . .

    Your suggestion that Mitt should feel humiliated . . . is one of the . . . most tone-deaf comments . . . .

    Few politicians suffer from excessive humility.

     Machiavelli understood that.

    Romney is no exception.

    In The Prince, there’s a wonderfully instructive passage (I can’t seem to put my finger on it right this minute) where Machiavelli describes the difference between polticians (and what they want) and what today we would call “everyday ordinary people” (and what everyday ordinary people want).

    One ought to resist every inclination to attribute to politicans noble qualities different from those they actually possess.

    I’m not saying Romney is not noble, just not in the way most think.

    And I’m not saying Romney is not virtuous, but the inflated image of him as a purely disinterested, self-sacrificing, saintly man actually harmed his candidacy because it was contrary to what “ordinary everyday people” instinctively know about politicians and their motivations.

    (My hearing is actually pretty good.)

    • #25
    • November 11, 2012 at 12:09 pm
  26. Profile photo of Astonishing Inactive
    Keith Preston
    wmartin
    Astonishing:

    Bill Kristol was right about Romney’s one-dimensional campaign: When your opponent accuses you of making war on women, you must answer that specific accusation, and chanting “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent accuses you of hating the poor, you must answer that specific accusation, and “jobs” is not an effective response; when your opponent says you are “not one of us,” chanting “jobs” is not an effective response.

    I would be happy to go a very long while without hearing from Bill Kristol again. . . .

    Add Laura Ingraham’s Mitt bashing to that list. . . .

    Bill Kristol was one of the few who has been spot on at every point, from the start of the GOP campaign until now. (Even in his prediction for the election, you can sense that he was predicting a Romney win, not because he thought it was actually likely, but because he knew predicting otherwise would harm Romney’s chances.)

    Kristol’s tone is always mild, sometimes too mild, and his advice is always worth considering.

    • #26
    • November 11, 2012 at 12:16 pm
  27. Profile photo of Nanda Panjandrum Inactive
    Nanda Panjandrum

    History – in campaigns as elsewhere – is written, largely, by the (often patronizing) winners. Still, thanks for this, Adam… 

    • #27
    • November 13, 2012 at 2:05 am