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I agree with Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (N.Y.), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, that we’ve seen a recent case of a well-known law enforcement executive doing his job and potentially gaining a personal political benefit. A Republic only works if elected officials get the benefit of voters voting for them when they do well what […]

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Bring On the Witnesses

 

McSally Collins GardnerYes, new witnesses will prolong the process by weeks at a minimum, and voting for witnesses under a Cocaine Mitch-Ted Cruz plan is likely necessary to a Trump and Trump-voter-supporting Congress winning this November. On Friday, there will be a series of votes. It is now more likely than not that there will be 51 votes, including Susan Collins (Republican-Maine), Mitt Romney (Snake-Self Serving), Lamar Alexander (Retiring-Chamber of Commerce), and Lisa Murkowski (Scheming-Big Union and Oil).

Senator Collins faithfully represents her state. She is a woman of honor who will take a tough vote when needed. It is she who reportedly first floated the common-sense proposal that the Senate trial should be run on the same rules as for the President Clinton trial. There was a basic sense of turn-about as fair play in this. She prevailed; these are the rules in the current Senate trial.

Senator McConnell is reportedly maneuvering for a single basket of witnesses vote, no chance for troublemakers and RINOS to actually work with the Democrats to inflict maximum damage on the president and the Republican majority in the Senate. This will work if he also insists on the Cruz control: paired 1-for-1 witness approval. You want the ‘Stashe? You have to vote for Biden’s boy. You want Mick Mulvaney? You have to vote for Eric Ciaramella. “Do ya really wanna jump?” [officially sanctioned clip, so “R” rated]

Berkeley Bolts On Boalt

 

Today, the President of the University of California, Janet Napolitano, decided to remove the name of John Boalt from the law school building at the University of California at Berkeley. Boalt undeniably made racist remarks opposing Chinese immigration to California in the late 19th century, which added to the forces that resulted in the passage of the infamous Chinese Exclusion Act.

I have taught at Berkeley Law (as we are supposed to call it, rather than Boalt Hall, as it was known for decades) for 27 years (unbelievably to both conservatives and liberals).  I think that Boalt was flat wrong in his views and that the nation erred in its policies on immigration during this time. If I had my way, we would increase legal immigration even now by a factor of 2x and 3x, rather than considering its restriction.

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I was driving in my car today on some errands, and got to thinking.  My car is a front engined, rear drive V-8.  The handgun I carry with me is a compact 1911 variant.  Both of those things, 1911 style handguns and small block V-8’s are quintessentially American devices.  Both are technologically somewhat out of […]

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David French says, “Don’t Believe Anyone Who Says Bernie Sanders Can’t Win“. Well? He is right, of course. Bernie could win, just as Jeremy Corbin could have won; the real question is, “How likely is it that Bernie would win?” And to that, the answer is “NOT LIKELY!” unless the alleged Right, those who espoused […]

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My wife (neutral observer) and I are going to celebrate Brexit tomorrow night with fish and chips for dinner.  I’m going to down it with some Guiness Stout.  Yeah, I know it’s Irish, but that’s close enough for me (a former government worker). Does anyone else have any special plans?  A Brexit party, perhaps? Preview […]

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The Conservative Stewardship of Christopher Tolkien

 

“A wizard is never late,” says the wizard Gandalf in Peter Jackson’s film adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lords of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. “Nor is he early. He arrives precisely when he needs to.”

I am not a wizard. Which is why I am only now getting around to memorializing J.R.R.’s son Christopher, who died earlier this month at age 95. Indeed, his passing has already been noted, in a more timely fashion, elsewhere on Ricochet. So I can only hope that readers will excuse my tardiness. For Christopher’s efforts on behalf of his father’s literary legacy are not merely worthy of praise in themselves. They also present an example of what it means to be conservative, in the most literal sense.

Christopher was involved in the saga of The Lord of the Rings almost from its very beginning. Though the germ of Middle-Earth predates any of J.R.R.’s children, telling what became his works as stories to his children helped him refine and develop them. Christopher later recalled, “[a]s strange as it may seem, I grew up in the world he created. For me, the cities of The Silmarillion are more real than Babylon.” And of these children, Christopher was the keenest on these tales. So keen, in fact, that his father put a young Christopher to work as an editor. In a letter to his publisher, the elder Tolkien wrote that “I received a letter from a young reader in Boston (Lincs.) enclosing a list of errata [in The Hobbit]. I then put my youngest son to find any more at two pence a time. He did. I enclose the results—which added to those already submitted should (I hope) make an exhaustive list.”

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Either Poles are too dumb to understand what’s ridiculous about a pornographic butter-churning contest, or they’re not. I’d bet they’re not, and they know a parody of eroticism when they see it. Too bad The Imaginative Conservative doesn’t. Apparently, there’s at least one writer out there lacking the imagination to recognize a parody when he […]

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President Trump’s Job Approval Rises Again

 

Twenty-two days ago I wrote a Ricochet post about the fact that, despite the impeachment proceeding, President Trump’s job approval was approaching an all-time high in the RCP average of polls.  On January 6, 2020, his average job approval was 45.2%, down slightly from 45.3% on the prior day.  This was the highest level since February 4, 2017.

Of course, these poll averages bounce around a bit.  The President’s job approval dipped slightly after my post, but has now risen again, to 45.6%:

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Listening to sports-talk radio, I often ask myself: “Does Ebonics really have that many words for ‘uncertain paternity’”? But rather than pursue this, I’d like to discuss funny Brazilian first names. I did something like this a while ago for funny Turkish last names, but I could have done it for first names too: ones […]

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So, I’ve been watching What’s My Line?, starting from the first episode and marching forward at 1.25 playback speed. There are all sorts of fascinating cultural and historical insights to be gained from this passtime. Which brings us to February. One of the low-frequency repeating “lines” or occupations is the “advice to the lovelorn” columnist. […]

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