Member Post

 

It is a peculiarity of Christianity that our end is our beginning. “It is the last hour”, the disciple John says. Since the first year following Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection, Christians have been waiting for His glorious return. The “end times” began in Year 1 Anno Domini and have continued to the present day.  Preview […]

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Member Post

 

For any ignorant person who reads this and has a fit, I am not calling for all journalists to be murdered, attacked or spat on. But one has to ask why do people feel such anger towards journalists. Could it be because the profession is filled to the core with liars, defamers, frauds and the […]

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How Did You Find Ricochet?

 

We are having a nice discussion on the member page talking about ways to improve Ricochet and advertising is coming up.

It led to my remembering how I found Ricochet a few years ago. I was watching Uncommon Knowledge on YouTube and Peter Robinson was interviewing John Yoo; they talked about something called Ricochet and I wondered what it was. A few more videos and the constant mentioning of the site came up and I decided to come here. I started listening to podcasts and became hooked pretty soon after.

A Warrior’s Last Days

 

Kit Carson arrived in Pueblo, CO, riding in the back of Daniel Oakes’ wagon about the second day of April 1868. A runner was sent to the town’s doctor, Michael Beshoar, telling him that Carson was ill and needed to see him as soon as possible. Beshoar was working at his second job which was editor and publisher of a local newspaper. He hurried to his medical office only moments before Carson.

After the examination, Carson spent the night in Pueblo and met with the doctor the next morning for an opinion. He was told that he had an aneurysm of the carotid artery, a bulge in the weakened wall of the artery, and he should have bed rest for a few days before continuing to travel. The old scout refused the bed rest saying he belonged with his wife for the birth of their eighth child. He was given some wild cherry syrup laced with opium and tincture of veratrum to slow his heart. He paid the doctor three silver dollars and left to rejoin his wife.

Three days after Kit and the now 40-year-old Josefa Carson settled back into the borrowed three-room apartment belonging to Tom Boggs in eastern Colorado, their eighth child was born. It was a daughter and Kit insisted she be named Josefita after her mother. It was April 13.

Courage in the Empire and Lone Star States

 

As most of you probably know by now, there were two terrible attacks on peaceful Americans at prayer this weekend.

On Sunday morning, at the West Freeway Church of Christ near Fort Worth, Texas, a gunman shot two church members during worship service.  Texas being Texas, the church had volunteer armed security and the head of security killed the attacker in seconds with a single shot.

Member Post

 

Liberal logic can be as hard to understand as it is to use those words together in a sentence. But who cares, for tonight.  Please stay off the roads.  There are no sober drivers out there tonight.  Those of us who have worked ER shifts on New Year’s Eve won’t drive on this night.  Free […]

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Happy Old Year

 

It seems to have become fashionable — even de rigeur — to observe the end of every year with “Good riddance!” It’s a trend I’ve noticed for the last several years, but it has doubtless been going on longer than that. Every December 31, we’re all inundated with online commentary insisting that the year now ending has been a terrible one, and we’re glad to finally see the back of it. Often it’s just a throwaway comment in a story about something else, repeated as if it goes without saying (“It was an awful year, but there were some interesting phones released!”). It’s predictable, and it’s tiresome.

I’m not claiming that every year is a good one. But it’s no less reasonable to say that every year is a bad one, and that’s the impression one would get by surveying the online chatter from each December. My bet is that most of these comments come from people whose lives are actually going fine, but it’s a knee-jerk reflex to sound disgruntled all the time. I suppose the reasoning must be that contentment results only from ignorance, so griping and complaining are a badge of intelligence and awareness. But words have an effect, and I find it depressing to be surrounded by so many people who are so determined to be unhappy (or at least to portray themselves as unhappy).

Powell’s Books in Portland (short observations)

 

I went to a bookstore in Portland as part of a short vacation trip with my Dad. It was Powell’s Books which is truly a great bookstore. Three or four stories of anything you could want but Limbaughs’ latest book. The new-age shamanistic ritual section was especially fun and expansive.

By far my favorite was the Northwest section; they really did have lots of hard-to-find books about the local history, architecture, and sheer uniqueness of the Pacific Northwest. It was refreshing to find a selection of books that wouldn’t be readily available in any other part of the world. I hope a visitor to Chengdu Sichuan can visit a bookstore filled with odd books about Sichuanese stuff that she has never heard about before.

What I found peculiar was that every section of the bookstore had a section that highlighted books by LGBTQ and people of color. You would think that Portland was filled with nothing but black and brown same-sex couples hugging in a sentimental fashion. Also, I seem to recall that people of color didn’t include Asian people for some reason. This is odd because from what I saw, Asians were a significant minority of people in Portland. According to Google, 8.06% of Portland’s citizens are Asian and 5.51% are mixed race. (Asians have a high rate of intermarriage.)

Member Post

 

A friend recently gave me a book entitled ‘The River of Doubt’ by Candace Millard.  Millard is a former photographer and writer for National Geographic.  The book is about ex-President Theodore Roosevelt’s trip down an uncharted tributary of the Amazon in early 1914.  The story is absolutely gripping and Millard is a superb narrator.    […]

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QotD: How the years ran away…the best is yet to come

 

Yesterday when I was young
The taste of life was sweet as rain upon my tongue
I teased at life as if it were a foolish game
The way the evening breeze may tease a candle flame
The thousand dreams I dreamed, the splendid things I planned
I always built, alas, on weak and shifting sand
I lived by night and shunned the naked light of day
And only now I see how the years ran away

Charles Aznavour (1966)

The Best is yet to come and babe, won’t that be fine?
You think you’ve seen the sun, but you ain’t seen it shine

Member Post

 

In these last days of 2019, we are again deluged by media coverage of the interminable “New Year’s Resolutions.” We ask each other what our resolutions are. The scolds among us suggest resolutions (“you could lose a few pounds,” etc.). But for most of us, even if we quietly make one or two, chances are we […]

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It’s Not a Mask

 

I’m tired but can’t sleep; an experience everyone has at some point. But not everyone fears to close one’s eyes for what thoughts and dreams will rush into the void of sensation. Not everyone screams and mutters without making a sound in a familiar internal battle to “just shut up and go to sleep.”

Mental illnesses are as varied as personalities. We speak of symptoms and causes generally, as with diseases and purely physical ailments, because there is a utility in generalizations and playing the odds. But depression, crippling anxiety, compulsions, hallucinations, and other psychological oddities are not like a rash that looks the same on anyone.

Prospective Fact Check on Monsey Machete Attack

 

There has already been plenty of finger pointing over the attempted massacre of a group of Orthodox Jewish men in Monsey, New York. The FBI is now on the case. Whatever explanations are offered up, by whatever source, check them against the map and what we have been told about the location of the attack and the attacker’s life.

Reason and Authority

 

I have a new book on Reason, Authority, and the Healing of Desire in the Writings of Augustine. What exactly are reason and authority? Let’s talk about that. Ok, not really. Let’s just overview what Augustine thinks.

We might define reason as rational belief and trust in authority as irrational belief—perhaps as having nothing to do with rationality, or maybe as in tension or conflict with it. But this is way off. Augustine explains that it’s rational to trust the testimony of authority. It is necessary for life, and even those who most protest against trust-based systems of belief readily trust their parents’ claim to being their parents, the claims of geographers about distant cities, and the claims of historians about ancient people.

We might even go so far as to suggest that reason is merely the operating of our minds in a rational manner in order to know the truth; we could further define trust in authority as one of reason’s necessary operations. This is closer to Augustine, but still not quite right. He emphasizes the distinction between reason and authority, not their sameness.

Member Post

 

Happy Holidays to all of you, our faithful Ricochet members. For those of you who don’t know, I help run things around here (full disclosure I also have another job) and if you are a Ricochet Audio Network podcast listener, you’ve probably heard my name mentioned now and then (usually in frustration or worse). Next […]

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