Two Museums

 

Last week a friend and I visited two WW2 Museums, the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans and the National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg, TX. We spent a day and a half at each; both are worth visiting though they provide very different experiences.  What’s been your experience visiting either of these museums?

Let’s start with the setting. The better known of the two, the National WW2 Museum, is in the tourist mecca of New Orleans, a city I don’t care for, while the Pacific War museum is in a small town in the Texas hill country an hour and a half from Austin and San Antonio. It’s no surprise the New Orleans museum has many more visitors.

Member Post

 

You may believe that climate change is man made or natural – or maybe a little of both, which is where I fall in. I don’t think 50-50, but it is clear that things are changing. Political entities on both sides have grabbed the concept of climate change and turned it into a heated political […]

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We Have Met the Enemy and He Is Us

 

Hope I can use that expression from Pogo Possum in a post title because it is apropos and has been around for most of the period that Americans have been fighting Communists. Americans have always fought against Communists because communism represents the very antithesis of the American Ideal that was the crux of the colonial patriot cause in the American War for Independence as expressed in the Declaration, individual liberty. Now, one of our two major political parties has gone full-fledged in support of communist principles led by an avowed communist, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

How did we get to this point? A major step was taken in the 1970s when some members of the legal profession began to jump at every opportunity to promote victimization. Go to critical legal studies for a discussion of how this happened. (anonymous brought that to my attention.)

Trump Takes the Cake

 

Have you ever seen such bravery? This bakery claims to “Welcome All Races.” I know, there are so many businesses these days that say, “I won’t serve you, you’re Asian,” but this place won’t stand for that. I believe even Eskimos could buy a cupcake here.

But that’s not all. They welcome, “All Religions.” So if you went in and said, “I worship Molech and our temple has a big sacrifice coming up. We’re going to slaughter a dozen younglings. Do you think you could bake a special cake for that?” It would not phase them in the least. “All Countries of Origin” are welcome as well. I bet if you tell them you’re not in the country legally you probably wouldn’t even have to pay for your knish.

“All Sexual Orientations” and “All Genders” are also welcome. I know, that one really set all you bigoted readers back. You probably work in an auto parts store where a woman comes in and you’ll say, “I’m sorry ma’am, we can’t sell this gasket to you. But we’d be happy to sell it to your husband.” Or you work at a fast food joint, and by policy, before you sell anyone a burger, you must first inquire about the guest’s views on bestiality. Not this bakery. Whatever freaky thing you do in the sack, they’re still willing to sell you a babka.

Trump Meets Kim in North Korea

 

Donald Trump made history overnight as the first sitting US President to visit North Korea. The POTUS met Kim Jong Un at the Demilitarized Zone Sunday and walked 20 steps into North Korea.

Trump spontaneously offered Kim to shake hands at the DMZ on Saturday and security officials on both sides scrambled to make it happen. The two met for about 50 minutes in a US effort to revive talks with the hermit kingdom. From CNN:

“Would you like me to step across?” Trump asked Kim as they shook hands. “I am OK with it.”

Liberal Voters Have Decided to Stop Listening

 

I can’t imagine being a standard American liberal voter, listening to their 20 presidential candidates. First, it’s a little weird that there were no American flags at their debates – not even little pins on their lapels. They’re running for president of the United States? So they like America, right? Why not just one flag in the corner of the stage, to deflect the obvious criticisms?

And then they propose a socialist economy (socialized medicine, government-funded education, reparations, renewable energy, and on and on and on), but without the socialist tax structure. Right now, the vast majority of our taxes are paid by the wealthy. The tax burden on the middle and lower class is very small. That obviously can’t work. If we spend like a socialist economy, then we must tax like a socialist economy.

The standard American liberal voter must understand such things, right? They must know that the promises that their candidates are making simply cannot be kept. It’s impossible. So they know they’re being lied to. But they tolerate it. Or they just don’t listen.

Quote of the Day: Greed, Political and Otherwise

 

“It is amazing how many of the intelligentsia call it ‘greed’ to want to keep what you have earned, but not greed to want to take away what somebody else has earned, and let politicians use it to buy votes.” – Thomas Sowell

If we substituted Democrat presidential candidate for intelligentsia we would have a perfect one-sentence encapsulation of both sets of Presidential debates last week. Yet Sowell anticipated their positions by at least 20 and possibly 30 years with this statement.

John J. DiIulio Jr.: Big Government, Then and Now

 


Surveys tell us that Americans are increasingly dissatisfied with government institutions—from Congress and federal agencies to state and local governments. Given our aversion to taxes and bureaucracy, why do we demand the government do so much? And what can be done to improve the quality of our government’s performance?

In this provocative Conversation, University of Pennsylvania political scientist John J. Dilulio, Jr. argues that America does not have enough government workers to accomplish the tasks we demand of our government. Dilulio points to the paradox that we have not witnessed any increase in the federal workforce since the mid-1960s, while government spending has exploded since that time. Instead, the federal government has increasingly outsourced work to for-profit contractors, state and local employees who are de-facto federal workers, as well as non-profit workers. Making matters worse, we do not give the federal workers the discretion and oversight necessary to achieve good results. This “government by proxy,” according to Dilulio, is plagued by a lack of accountability, out-of-control spending, and poor outcomes. This is a must-see Conversation for anyone interested in the inner workings of American government.

Member Post

 

Bach’s Partita No. 1 is joyful keyboard music. This video contains two recitals of Partita No. 1. (The second recital  begins at 15:37.) If you do not have fifteen minutes to spare, just listen to the last of the seven partita segments (giga or jig), the most unreservedly joyful of them all, that begins at […]

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Member Post

 

Since at least 2008, Google has devoted significant corporate resources to electing Democrats. Can shareholders sue over this misallocation of corporate resources. I think that the two founders maintain a controlling share of the company. If so, they can’t be easily voted out, but there should be some protection for the minority. Preview Open

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Member Post

 

Andrew McCarthy is wrong this time. He calls not only for a policy of regime change but also for President Trump to call for “regime change” in Iran. McCarthy should pay closer attention to the history of American presidents talking up “liberation” or regime change. Consider both President Eisenhower and President George H.W. Bush, and […]

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Group Writing: Hot Labs and Health Physics

 

When people in my line of work refer to something as “Hot” we are not generally talking about temperature. We are talking about radioactive contamination.

This is a hot lab.  It has the shielding to protect the researcher or technician (this appears to be a nuclear medicine setup), radiation signage, the absorbent padding on the counter, lead pigs for moving around radiation sources, and a Geiger counter/survey meter for detecting radiation. Radiation and radioactive materials are very useful, while requiring special precautions.  Thus was born the field of Health Physics, the science of radiation protection.

The name Health Physics is derived from the Manhattan Project.  It was a way to disguise the nature of the program with a title that did not reference radiation or radioactive elements.  Nowadays, health physicists work in the medical field, nuclear energy, and research.  While I am not a health physicist, I sometimes feel like I play one on TV.  I’ve been interested in radiation since I was a little kid hearing my father’s stories from the nuclear power plant.  I learned my alphas, betas, and gammas along with my As, Bs, and Cs.  This knowledge has come in handy surprisingly often.

Member Post

 

I can’t be the only one to have thought of this.  Everyone keeps talking about “the culture” and “the heights of American culture” as if those were real things.  Are they?  The New York Times editorial board lives in such an intense bubble that they might as well be living on Mars.  Political journalists lie […]

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Belated Fathers Day Post

 

@arahant put up a post about… erm… “inappropriate” jokes last Friday. When I asked when we would see a Dad Jokes post, he suggested that since these things work best on Friday afternoons that I should do that this week. We really should have been celebrating these last Sunday.

I honestly never heard of Dad Jokes until someone started putting that moniker on them around 10-15 years ago. We used to just refer to them as “corny” – a term that apparently originated in those states that have vast swaths of said grain growing. To me, they’ve always been jokes that are intended to make the person hearing it want to smack their own forehead.

David Frenchism and the Supreme Court Decision

 

Over at National Review, David French has this to say about the Supreme Court decision preventing the administration from asking citizenship questions on the census:

Against this legal background, I believed that — like with the travel-ban case — a chaotic process would matter less than the very broad discretion granted the president by existing law. I was wrong.

Member Post

 

In the actual list of questions from the New York Times to the Democrat candidates for president* was this one: Does anyone deserve a billion dollars? If no one “deserves” a billion dollars, it means we’ll have take and redistribute the money that people have in excess of that, of course.  Let’s assume that there […]

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