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A fellow Ricochet member and co-author of “GPS Declassified: From Smart Bombs to Smartphones,” @richardeaston joins TOCradio and discusses topics covering from GPS development/evolution, military use vs civilian needs, and SpaceX launch of GEN III GPS satellites. Only on TOCradio can Amelia Earhart, Charles Lindbergh, and Galileo be linked; in this case to the fathers […]

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Remainers Can’t Stop No Deal Brexit if May’s Deal Voted Down, Says Leadsom Brexiteer and leader of the House of Commons Andrea Leadsom has said the legal default position is the UK leaving the bloc without a deal if Prime Minister Theresa May’s agreement is voted down in the House of Commons next month. Preview […]

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Isaac Asimov’s Predictions for 2019

 

Thirty-five years ago, the Toronto Star asked Isaac Asimov for his predictions of the future. Here’s an excerpt from the Dec. 31, 1983 article:

lf we look into the world as it may be at the end of another generation, let’s say 2019 — that’s 35 years from now, the same number of years since 1949 when George Orwell’s 1984 was first published — three considerations must dominate our thoughts:

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So Jay Cost has a nice bit over on National Review about the shutdown.  He makes some pretty good points about the Democrat opposition to the wall funding, it being primarily because it is Trump that is asking.  I’m not sure that’s 100% true, for I think it’s fair to say they are really, really, […]

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Book Review: The Historical Background of the King Arthur Legend

 

King Arthur is probably the world’s best-known fictional character. Writers from the 11th century’s Chrétien de Troyes to Bernard Cornwell in the 21st century have written stories about him. And the King Arthur’s legend keeps growing. A story this well-known must have a historical basis.

King Arthur: The Making of the Legend, by Nicholas J. Higham examines that issue. It’s a search for the source of the Arthur legend.

Arthur’s Britain, when and where a historical King Arthur could’ve existed, belonged to a chaotic and obscure corner of history. The Romans had retreated from Britannia. The island was being invaded by barbarians, and de-civilizing as it broke into a constellation of petty and competing kingdoms. Written accounts were spotty, and most history fell under oral tradition.

Who Would Want to Become a Doctor?

 

To become a medical doctor in the coming years, a person would need to be extremely dedicated—and a glutton for punishment. I’m beginning to wonder how many people will decide that becoming a doctor is simply not worth the sacrifices.

Many of us already know about some of the costs that a student faces to go to medical school:

The median four-year cost of medical school (including expenses and books) was $278,455 for private schools and $207,866 for public schools in 2013 according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. While grants and scholarships account for some of this total, lowering eventual debt to an average of $170,000-interest accrues while doctors are still completing their residencies, sometimes adding as much as 25% to the total debt load.

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Harness the Power of Wave Energy with the World’s Strongest Wave Power Concept. Oceans cover more than 70% of Earth’s surface and ocean waves carry enormous power. By utilizing the largest source of untapped clean energy, it could supply a substantial part of the world’s electricity. Wave energy is more predictable compared to wind power, […]

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Making (and Keeping) Your New Year’s Resolutions

 

“First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do.” — Epictetus

If you want to make a change, start now instead of waiting for some arbitrary date on the calendar. That’s what I tell myself when new year’s resolution time rolls around. Then comes January 17 and March 22 and October 12 and I still haven’t gotten around to setting some modest goals, let alone achieving them.

So this is one of the rare years I’ll actually write down some resolutions. My problem is that I need several color-coded spreadsheets and a 12-foot-long Gantt chart to fit all my goals. Hopefully, I can thin down my list before the clock strikes Midnight.

Ending Poverty in America

 

This article in The New Yorker, about J.D. Vance’s book, Hillbilly Elegy, revolves around the question of who or what is to blame for the poverty of “hillbillies”:

  • Society
  • The Economy
  • Culture
  • Hillbillies themselves

Its conclusion is that a good case can be made for any one of these – all are true. A question I have is: On which of these truths should we concentrate? Here are my thoughts:

How Did You Spend the Last Quiet Sunday of 2018?

 

On occasion I have shared my love of flying with the Ricochet community, and this morning on my way from Annapolis MD to New Garden PA involved a lazy flight over Maryland’s Eastern Shore. This is over a rural stretch of farm land that is situated between two of the East Coast’s largest metros. Baltimore/Washington and Philadelphia. Yet for all of this “relatively” recent manmade developments, it has not erased one of nature’s time-spanning rites. The Eastern Shore has been the winter nesting region for one of the most ancient rituals of some remaining legacy dinosaurs. In this case it is the southern most point for the migration of those Canadian Geese. (Insert Canadian jokes and misplaced passports here)

My flying buddy & I were in no hurry, and we witnessed several huge flocks of these bird doing their mid-morning foraging, which typically involve a group launch, scouting around for a less picked over field for their “elevensies“, flying en mass, then dropping it for more eating, squawking, and eating. We started to follow some of these group conflagrations. This is a group we were able to capture, I hope you all enjoy this as much a Stad morning review from Myrtle Beach, which inspired me to share this little video clip.

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Happy New Year to all of Ricochet. I am in the hospital in Phoenix and fortunate to be here, I think. Here’s how it happened. I had all my family for Christmas except my son, who lives in Virginia, and one grand child, who just finished college and started a new job in Utah. So […]

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Dr. StrangeTrump: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Character Questions (As Much)

 

If you had access to my Facebook account and went back far enough in my history, you would find out that I neither voted for Trump nor supported him at any point before his election. As time has gone by, I find myself spending more and more time defending him from critics; more accurately, I have spent time attacking his critics, not because I love Trump but because I have come to be confounded by some of them. Would I defend a similarly situated Democrat? No, in part because I wouldn’t like their policies (I also don’t agree with Trump on trade and immigration, but leave that aside). Does this mean I have gone over to a completely transactional view of politics or that I have given in to my cynicism about the federal government and the people that people it? Probably, but a fuller explanation is interesting (at least to me).

The Problem of Corruption and Lack of Character

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“As soon as a man comes to life,” wrote Martin Heidegger, “he is at once old enough to die.” That’s not exactly a new insight, but it does have the virtue of clarity, which wasn’t Heidegger’s long suit. Being and Time is so incoherent that it makes Hegel look breezy in comparison. Still, statements like Heidegger’s do […]

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