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Hi there, just a quick note — We moved house this spring. My trusty computer crashed during the move and about a gajillion things have been getting in the way of fixing it. For quite a while now I haven’t had frequent access to a computer (or an unbroken mobile device, now that I think […]

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Rose Wilder Lane

 

The removal of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s name from a children’s book award reminds me again of her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, an interesting writer and political thinker. Born in 1886 in the Dakota Territory, Rose is best known for her writings on political philosophy and has been referred to as a “Founding Mother” of libertarianism; she was also a novelist and the author of several biographies. In her article “Credo,” published in 1936, she describes her political journey, beginning with the words: “In 1919 I was a communist.”

She was impressed with the idealism of the individual Communists she met and found their economic logic convincing. But when she visited the Soviet Union in the 1920s, she became disillusioned. And, unlike many visitors to the USSR, she did not conclude that Communism was still a great idea but had just been carried out poorly; rather, she began to grasp the structural flaws with the whole thing.

In Russian Georgia, the villager who was her host complained about the growing bureaucracy that was taking more and more men from productive work, and predicted chaos and suffering from the centralizing of economic power in Moscow. At first, she saw his attitude as merely “the opposition of the peasant mind to new ideas,” and undertook to convince him of the benefits of central planning. He shook his head sadly.

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This is a national security issue if nothing else. Yes folks, not only is the barefoot Mexican giving birth in our hospitals to win that ‘lottery ticket’ but so are also upper class babes coming here to ‘win’ the US citizenship prizes for their precious angels and themselves. Preview Open

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Roe’s Legacy

 

Roe v. Wade was decided in 1973, one year after I graduated from high school. For nearly two centuries in our history, unborn children were recognized as members of the human race with the same right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness as any other person. Roe changed all that.  Unborn babies became fetuses, parasites, bits of protoplasm completely bereft of any rights at all.  In the last 43 years, over 60 million fetuses have been aborted in the US alone and, of that 60 million, 18 million were black. Worldwide, an estimate of nearly 1.5 billion babies have been aborted since the Roe decision pushed the green light for the US in 1973.

How important are these figures? Since 1973 there have been approximately 158 million live births reported in the US. (Stay with me now, dear reader, there is math.) That means there have been 218 million US pregnancies in the US reported since Roe was decided. Of those pregnancies, a full 27 percent were aborted. Put another way, more than one in four children conceived in the US since Roe have been destroyed, are lost and forgotten.

The numbers: 60,000,000 lives lost. How is this not the greatest tragedy of the last half-century? How is this not the most horrific loss of life ever in the recorded history of mankind? How is this not suicide of the species?

Quote of the Day: Stein’s Law

 

“If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.” – Herbert Stein

(Herbert Stein was an American economist, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and was on the board of contributors of The Wall Street Journal. He was chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.)

Yield Curves, Tariffs, and Sugar Stimulus: If and When the Trump Boom Goes Bust

 

Let me anticipate three objections to the headline. First, the proper nickname for a nine-year-old economic expansion should probably refer to the 44th president (perhaps along with the 14th and 15th Federal Reserve chairs). Second, so far this supposed “boom” looks more like same-old, same-old. First quarter GDP, for instance, was just revised down two ticks to 2% and monthly job growth is a bit weaker than under President Obama’s final few years. Third, why the negativity when most economists seem to be anticipating a marked economic acceleration?

Not unreasonable objections. My responses would be a) Trump is president, and the fiscal stimulus from his budget — both deficit-financed tax cuts and spending increases — plays a key role in the consensus expected GDP acceleration; and b) most economists are indeed looking for acceleration starting with the current quarter.

As for that third objection, there I was yesterday on MSNBC discussing the implications of the flattening yield curve, keying off a recent New York Times piece, “What’s the Yield Curve? ‘A Powerful Signal of Recessions’ Has Wall Street’s Attention.” From that Matt Phillips authored article:

Conan, What Is Best in Life?

 

Trump … I mean, Conan, what is best in life? “To crush your enemies, to see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentations of their women.” I’ll settle for this though. Haha. Liberal hysteria first day…..

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From the attractive book jacket, with the raised lettering, to the rave reviews on the back, and to the splendid prose between the covers, Bret Baier’s latest offering, which deals with Ronald Reagan and The Fall of The Soviet Union, is well worth the placing of it among your most cherished volumes. The prologue sets […]

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Wounded, Please Help … God Bless

 

A poverty tour. That’s my cynicism, and maybe a bit incorrect if you want to get into the meat of things. My experience with poverty, which is obviously limited by geography, is that the solution is rarely virtually never wealth. When poverty is the problem, it is more likely only a symptom, and it is almost assured that wealth will be fleeting. But as morticians develop a dark humor, so do I suspend reality and refer to a poverty tour, which was really just driving around in the worst of neighborhoods looking for confirmation of a hunch. A hunch better left unconfirmed, and I wasn’t expecting much more than the usual surreal backdrop-painting from my poverty tour; so it felt almost jolting when I ran into Steve at the corner of Fair and, well … an off-ramp, right where Fair turns into B.

Steve is a liar and a thief. He is a liar and a thief, a schemer and a cultist of the Id; he is a creature in some desecrated form of a man, who makes me feel less of a man for that constant reminder that there are creatures, like him, who I can’t quite bring myself to visualize as men. A dog, surrounded by crumbs and shreds of wrapper, will avert his eyes and tuck his tail between his legs, but the noble and loyal dog, to his credit, feels shame, and I would never condescend to name a dog Steven. But I did look this creature in the eyes, subconsciously hoping for him to drop the sign, walk over to his car (one of his cars), which was parked a block south, and head home with his tail between his legs.

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Chabad, a branch of Orthodox Judaism, sends out a weekly ezine on a variety of subjects. This past week one topic caught my eye: tchotchke. I’d never seen the word written before, but I knew just what it meant. As it turns out tchotchke (chawch-key) has multiple meanings, but I grew up with only one basic […]

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A Lesson from a Doctor Friend

 

I enjoy looking around the web for interesting blogs. For 20 years I was a home health aide. Many of my friends were EMTs, doctors, and nurses, as well as other licensed nursing assistants. To this day, I enjoy hearing or reading about diagnoses and remedies to common problems.

One evening I swallowed a fish bone. It was a rather long one and went down my throat lengthwise. I couldn’t sleep but did remember a friend of mine would be off his EMT shift and home by 11:30 PM.

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Please join us on the nightcap AMU tonight 930EDT/830CDT/730MDT/630PDT. Open to all topics, perhaps some of which will not include the word “Trump”. If you have a topic in mind, feel free to post it in a comment below. For example, we could discuss President Trump’s nomination of Ben Shapiro to the Supreme Court. Preview […]

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Since some kind Ricochetti have expressed an interest, here are some updates on the audiobook biz from Robin Hill (my home: come by and see us if you’re in the area!) @richardeaston will be glad to hear that “GPS Declassified” is continuing to sell well. It’s a fine book and I enjoyed narrating it. Thank […]

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