Africa Journal: Going Rogue

 

Gurley Street, Monrovia, Liberia.

Imagine you didn’t have squat. You live in a dirt-floored, corrugated zinc-roofed hut. You work and save and you finally get the opportunity to get a little something for yourself; let’s say an el cheapo transistor radio, so you can listen to the VoA or Liberia Today. Then somebody steals the little gimcrack you spent months saving for. How would you react?

Member Post

 

  I was contemplating putting some liberal patsy named Mark Morford in a Dodge Sportswagon with a portable hog rendering station and suddenly it hit me. There be a day when I’m not dangerous. How will it happen? It’s odd to envision no longer being a force of nature but the ravages of time take […]

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Member Post

 

In response to this week’s Richochet podcast, I want to suggest that one reason why Trump claimed it would be easy to change Washington—in addition to having a hyperactive ego—is because, foolishly (or not?), he thought he could act like a CEO rather than as president, as Obama did after he lost his majorities in […]

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Vive La Résistance!: A San Francisco Chronicle Columnist’s Plaintive Cry For Help

 

San Francisco Chronicle columnist Mark Morford posted a column that reads so far over the top, we had to excerpt a bit of it here to brighten your weekend:

It’s only been 100 days, but that’s a lifetime in Trump years. If disillusion is your measure, Trump is a runaway success. If moral heartache is the yardstick, we are miles high, and screaming doom. If this had all been a reality TV-show contest to see how quickly a single human could disembowel the national spirit, poison international goodwill and bring a pox upon all our houses, Trump has indeed proven to be the biggest loser.

Member Post

 

Like many, I have always looked at North Korea as a closed off country run by a dictator that controls every aspect of life for his people. Someone last week on radio described it as the world’s biggest open air concentration camp. Every so often, the leader throws a parade to show off their weapons, and launches test […]

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YAF at Brandeis: Dinesh D’Souza

 

This is a report I wrote on the talk that Dinesh D’Souza gave at my school last night, even though you can watch the whole thing here .

In the beginning, the Assistant Dean of Students somewhat awkwardly read a speech about how it is a good thing to have this event on campus, and then she pointed out that if people wanted to be loud, they could go to the convenient protest area behind the actual lecture hall, which got some laughs. (I’m sorry if you were hoping for drama in the piece, but spoilers: There was no trouble, and to be honest I didn’t expect any. D’Souza, who also spoke at Brandeis ten years ago, expressed surprise about this at the end.)

Member Post

 

I came across information that I thought Ricochet people in general might want to know about. It is directly related to one of the most important companies in the USA – Google. Everyone knows this tech juggernaut and its substantial influence and cachet as a company. Last week I learned that a Google facility hosted […]

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Quote of the Day: What I Like About Texas, 29 April 2017

 

You ask me what I like about Texas? Well aside from the obvious, such as @rightangles’ posts and pics, and the bluebonnets and Indian paintbrushes in full bloom at the height of spring, the list is exhaustive. We could be here all night long.

Fortunately, 31 years ago during the Texas sesquicentennial, country singer-songwriter Gary P. Nunn put that question and its many answers into a song, from which the following verse comes:

George

 

George was 77, going on 78 when we met. He owned a firm that rather suddenly had become my client due to an emergency failure in their IT network – an emergency that lasted 20 years. A protégé of George’s at the firm would end-up becoming one of my best friends – a relationship that will last forever.

George was remarkable: full-bird Colonel on General Patton’s staff, DoD project manager for the implementation of the world’s first mainframe computer, editor of a military journal for decades, college teacher, business owner, founder of the Pachyderms – a group of folks with thick skins, a sense of humor, and a keen interest in politics and bourbon.

But the thing I remember most about George was his gentle, humble laugh. We sat for many conversations over the years in his glass office on Kirby Drive – always quiet, private, and interesting. Until just a couple years ago, George came to the office everyday … wearing a tie and a smile, with a pipe in one hand and a newspaper in the other. He was a classic gentleman, old school. Every time we talked I learned something about life, the military, history, WWII, women, politics, the original mainframes, bourbon, or pipe tobacco. We never once talked business – his or mine. He had other things on his mind and I was interested in hearing about them. Making George laugh was a special treat for me – I’ll always remember that gentle sound.

Member Post

 

In his classic allegorical novel Animal Farm, George Orwell describes the gradual transformation of the pigs from downtrodden farm animals taking part in a livestock uprising into oppressors indistinguishable from the humans who previously ruled. Today, on our college campuses, the erstwhile victims of cultural conformity and rigid societal expectations, the philosophical descendants of the […]

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