Member Post

 

Alternate-Side Parking is a semi-regular, once or twice a week (or less), podcast. Each episode lasts approximately as long as it takes for me to find a new alternate-side parking space in my neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York; plus however long I feel like sitting in the driver’s seat gabbing. In this episode, I talk […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

The Republican Leadership Conference has just announced their speaker lineup for their upcoming conference in New Orleans (Link Here).  To publicize their event, they’re featuring their headline speaker “get”, Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson.  Donald Trump (!) gets second billing. Now I can understand having Phil their a little bit; he’s a celebrity, and politicians […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Why Not Tax Tenure?

 

Over at Bloomberg Views, Megan McArdle writes a provocative reflection on the nature of wealth. An excerpt: “I’ve been reading Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century. You’ll have to wait on my thoughts on the book until they’re a bit more fully formed. As I’ve been reading, though, I keep returning to a question I heard at an economics conference a couple of months back: If we did implement a wealth tax, should it tax tenure?”

Professorial tenure is, after all, a valuable asset. As long as you show up and teach your classes, and you don’t make passes at your students or steal from the department’s petty cash drawer, you can draw a paycheck for the rest of your working life. And since the abolition of mandatory retirement ages, that working life can be as long as you like.

Member Post

 

Is there ever a reason to put an incompetent person in to a position where others can be severely harmed?   Family ties? Money? Skin Color?  Reason says no yet these things have always happened. We elected him because he is Black.   He made it to college because he is Black.  He made it […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

A Presidency is a Terrible Thing to Waste

 

ObamaWOWhat President Obama’s speech today to the cadets at the United States Military Academy demonstrates is that he now lives in an alternate universe. He told the cadets that “by most measures the United States has rarely been stronger relative to the rest of the world,” when in fact we have never been weaker or less respected in world capitals. Not the since the 1970s have we seen a president weaker and more indecisive—with perilous consequences for the rest of the world.

He told them that the leadership of Al Qaeda has been “decimated,” when in fact it has not.

He told them that the war in Afghanistan was winding down, when in fact his thoughtless 2016 troop withdrawal deadline will ensure the war only heats up.

The Time for Reparations is Now

 

shutterstock_135245903There are certain times when windows open, allowing previously marginal ideas to flourish and the unthinkable to become possible. Gay marriage started out in the early ’90s as the pipe dream of a few cranky law professors; soon, it is going to be the law of the land throughout the country. The movement to have the US pay out reparations for slavery is in its early stages; it’s easy enough for us to write it off now, but expect this to be pushed with some urgency over the next 10 to 20 years. The reason is that this is one social movement that comes with a time limit.

The window for reparations is slowly closing because of demographic changes in this country. Any such scheme will depend on rich, white Baby Boomers who are receptive to appeals based on guilt. As those people die off over the next 20 years, they will be replaced by two main groups.

The first is white Gen Xers, who will be a less-than-optimal target for extraction. Productive people about my age (38) will be squeezed for as much tax revenue as possible as we move into our peak earning years — and our peak earning years will not be nearly as productive as our Boomer parents’ were. They came of age when America was still on an upward trajectory.

Member Post

 

Oh, how I hate those long goodbyes! This article examines the etiquette of the goodbye and the rationale for quietly slipping out.  Goodbyes are, by their very nature, at least a mild bummer. They represent the waning of an evening or event. By the time we get to them, we’re often tired, drunk, or both. […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

‘Whiskey Apocalypse’ Threatens Blogger’s Favorite Coping Mechanism

 

shutterstock_173900870The prophecies were true: a “whiskey apocalypse” threatens to ravage the lives of brown beverage producers and enthusiasts alike. Hootch experts explain that the public is downing bottles of premium whiskey faster than the barrel-aged libations can be produced.

“Despite the increase in distillation over the past few years,” says the Buffalo Trace Distillery, “bourbon demand still outpaces supply.” That goes for fine scotch and other top-shelf potables as well, all of which became trendy overnight. “Ten years ago everybody drank vodka, and Scotch was something you kept around for when your dad visited. Now, whiskey of all kinds has become a fetish object of the young, urban, and image-conscious.”

The Four Horsemen of the Whiskey Apocalypse are sporting Selvedge denim, fancy beards and ironic fedorae:

Template Progressivism

 

shutterstock_128011673Scan the headlines on any given day and you will see the left plotting to tinker with every aspect of society they can get their hands on. By its very nature, progressivism is allergic to Burkean restraint. There is no limit to the institutions they may try to overhaul. Not even the seven-day week is safe.

For eons, all manner of animals have lived their lives according to the cycles of the Earth’s rotation on its axis, the moon’s orbit around the Earth, and the Earth’s orbit around the sun. But why do we observe the week? 

As one who self-identifies as a non-college graduate, I cannot speak to what writers and journalists are being taught in America’s universities. I suspect they are, at some point, given a template with which to write articles calling for the rethinking of longstanding institutions. This is a good thing, as allowing such traditions to arise naturally from accumulated societal wisdom is foolish when contrasted against a plan devised while in Trader Joe’s while checking a bag of chips to ensure that none of the ingredients have been genetically modified.

Healthcare Equality for All!

 

ambulanceJust over a week ago a beloved family member collapsed in the middle of the night, was rushed to the hospital in shock and underwent emergency surgery for internal bleeding. Sophie received a post-operative blood transfusion and spent two days in intensive care. Thanks to expert, timely and compassionate care, today she is back home and doing well.

Excellent emergency medical care is the norm in the United States, thank goodness. What stands out from my family’s recent hospital experience is the administrative side.

Consider: while Sophie was being prepped for surgery, the nurse provided us a detailed estimate of the likely cost of her stay, breaking down the clinical variables and associated prices that would determine the final bill. On discharge day the charges came in as forecast. No surprises. No red tape. No Obamacare. We paid by credit card and were on our way. 

Member Post

 

  Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a congenital malformation that occurs in about one in every 4,500 girls.  The Müllerian duct fails to develop and they are born without a vagina or uterus (warning: graphic medical image).  They are, however, born with functioning ovaries and therefore develop typical secondary sex characteristics and can have children, although through […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

This Week’s Ricochet Podcast: Question Time

 

Questionable_largeEvery few months, we throw out the guests, don the Riddler suits (yes, they actually wear them when we tape these shows),  and open the floor to you, our faithful members to ask anything of our two founders and James Lileks. You can ask anything you want, on any topic (questions do have to be CoC compliant, of course!). Leave them in the comments below and we’ll get to as many as we can in tomorrow’s broadcast.

P.S. Members, you can listen in live and chat with each other. Wait, you’re still not a member? What the heck are you doing? Join today and ask a question! 

Member Post

 

Feminists the world over rejoiced today as a homeless, drug-addicted woman was arrested for a series of violent crimes in Newark, New Jersey. The unidentified woman was the first pistol-packing, tobacco-chewing mentally-impared woman arrested in New Jersey for sexual assault this year whose butt crack is also clearly visible in her arrest photo. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Is “The Hunger Games” Conservative?

 

Hunger-Games-Katniss-Everdeen-1Some say the blockbuster Hunger Games series of books and films displays a world in which capitalism is bad and socialism is good while others say it illustrates the inequality and abuse of a “command economy.” The poverty of the districts isn’t the result of greedy capitalists but of a totalitarian state. 

Trading markets for a command economy and trading democracy for a dictatorship may lead to hunger for the Districts, but it hampered the growth available at the top of society as well. Though they may not realize it, the wealthy citizens of the Capitol were living like beggars compared to the wealth of a free and peaceful society.

Erik Kain at Forbes is right. The economics of the Hunger Games can hardly be described as free-market capitalism. Yet, some insist that this is exactly the cause of Panem’s suffering: “The Hunger Games shows us how to play and alter the rules in a game for survival; instead of showing us a victory of capitalism, however, the actual hunger games shows us in metaphor a socialist’s perspective on the ‘brutality’ of a free-market economy by replacing businesses with children.” An article at the Huffington Post echoes this sentiment: The Hunger Games is “an allegory about cashing in on the next generation’s future hopes and dreams.”