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If  … The Supreme Court concurs with Vaughn Walker’s Proposition 8 ban  … based on Walker’s claim that  the only possible reason why (a majority of) Californians voted to ban same-sex marriage is bigotry The Supreme Court decides 5-4  … does that mean that five Supreme Court justices are calling the other four “bigots?” Preview Open

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…a little help? I was scrounging around in the back of the knife drawer this morning when my hand wrapped around a forgotten object–the Buck 110 hunting knife I’d bought in 1977 and hardly ever used because I could never put a decent edge on it. In fact it’s the only knife I’ve never been able to […]

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My pastor took an interesting and different tack this year in dealing with Resurrection Sunday; instead of looking directly at the narrative of the resurrection, he took a look at what changed the last of the apostles, into an apostle.  I’m speaking, of course of Saul of Tarsus, known to us through most of his […]

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The town I lived in during the 90’s was a Tahoe resort town which has an Aspen like quality to it.  This of course means that you get some of the rich and famous folks occupying it which also means you’ll run in to celebrities every now and then.   My neighbor, in a much […]

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Apparently, Big Labor and Big Business have agreed, in principle, to a comprehensive immigratino reform.  The deal includes wage regulations and amnesty/ path to citizenship. If such a deal is, indeed in the offing, American conservatives should highlight two concerns.  Wage regulations are seldom wise, and any party that wishes to be free market should […]

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Was Orwell Right?

 

She had escaped East Germany even as the iron curtain was rising, forever scarring her family and her nation while demonstrating, for all with eyes to see, the ghastly requirements of omnipotent government.  Her inability to speak even a single word of English was wonderfully offset by her keen and good-natured husband, who was from Australia and the only translator I ever met who provided beer for a conversation.  It was 1986 when I met this remarkable couple, while deployed to Germany in the weeks after President Reagan ordered the military strike that gave Colonel Gaddafi a heavy dose of that old time religion.  The couple described in detail the labyrinth of asinine regulations and bureaucratic minutia with they had to contend just to send packages and correspondence to her family back in East Germany, where the Stasi watched closely over their captors with all the overbearing paranoia of an abusive spouse.  

To a young man whose Commander in Chief was Ronald Reagan, this woman’s experience seemed so utterly foreign, so incredibly wretched, as to be all but incomprehensible.  The idea that her family lived in a country that contained what they called a “Death Strip,” where East German soldiers were instructed to machine gun any of their countrymen who tried to escape, seemed a throwback to the savagery of another time.  The concept of the Stasi itself, always listening, always watching, keeping copious records on the activities of those citizens who questioned their government, arresting some in the middle of the night, seemed like something from the hyperactive imagination of a highly caffeinated novelist, rather than the real life experiences of this woman and her family.  Her country was alien to me.  

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Sports are entertainment. You pretty much know what you’re going to get when you watch – fantastic plays, bone-headed moves, questionable coaching, an unknowable outcome and two to three hours away from the intrusion of politics and race. Occasionally, life does intrude. Sometimes, in the case of Jackie Robinson, it inspires. Sometimes, in the case […]

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David Stockman’s Rant

 

Easter Sunday is not a time when most of us focus our attention on politics — which may be why it was on this day that Pravda-on-the-Hudson chose to publish in its Sunday Review section David Stockman’s rant against everyone from FDR to Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Barack Obama, and Ben Bernanke. When you get the time, read it and ponder its argument. It is, I believe, at least half-true. Here is a sample:

THE state-wreck ahead is a far cry from the “Great Moderation” proclaimed in 2004 by Mr. Bernanke, who predicted that prosperity would be everlasting because the Fed had tamed the business cycle and, as late as March 2007, testified that the impact of the subprime meltdown “seems likely to be contained.” Instead of moderation, what’s at hand is a Great Deformation, arising from a rogue central bank that has abetted the Wall Street casino, crucified savers on a cross of zero interest rates and fueled a global commodity bubble that erodes Main Street living standards through rising food and energy prices — a form of inflation that the Fed fecklessly disregards in calculating inflation.

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I hope that everyone is having a wonderful Easter.  Being a pessimmist at heart, however, I view several recent events in Christendom–to wit, the elections of a new Archbishop of Canterbury and a new Pope–with a sense of gloom and foreboding.  Even though the new Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has the distinct advantage of […]

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Google Celebrates Chavez Instead of Easter

 

If you go to Google’s search engine, you won’t see any pictures of Christ or even Easter bunnies. Instead, you’ll find a picture of Cesar Chavez in the middle of the Google logo to honor the birthday of the late labor activist.

President Obama proclaimed March 31 “Cesar Chavez Day” in 2011, stating, “I call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate service, community, and educational programs to honor Cesar Chavez’s enduring legacy.”

Stray Observations While on the Road

 

I have just returned from a Spring vacation family trip by car from Hillsdale, Michigan to Charleston, South Carolina. Along the way, as on previous excursions of this sort, I noticed various things that caused me to wonder.

One was that motels no longer take care to make travelers aware of the churches, synagogues, and temples in their vicinity and of the times in which services take place. Another was that one can no longer expect to find a Gideon Bible in one’s hotel or motel room. And there was a third such observation that I made. We used a GPS for navigation, and it afforded us with the means to find gas stations, restaurants, and, in a pinch, even a Starbucks. But it did not provide guidance for anyone in search of a church. While I was not paying close attention, something in this country changed. Religion has been marginalized. Where its presence was once pervasive and simply taken for granted, it has become almost invisible.

Is It Possible to Get the State Out of Marriage?

 

John Fund has raised a trial balloon on National Review Online with his suggestion that the best response to the huge dispute over gay marriage is for the state to get out of the marriage business altogether and leave it solely to private contract to create and define marital relationships. As a good libertarian, it is tempting to support this proposal. But that temptation ought to be resisted. Here is why.

One notable gap in the Fund column was any reference to the status of children of this union. That covers issues dealing with child support and inheritance rights. It also deals with issues of guardianship and divorce. It is hard enough to deal with these questions when it is known who is married to whom. It is even harder to deal with them when the nature of these private relationships resists standardization.

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It is a well-established diktat among certain of the punditocracy that to become relevant and have any chance of winning national elections, the GOP has to tack to the middle on “social” issues like Same Sex Marriage, abortion, immigration, and so on. Most recently on the main feed we have Rick Wilson’s Culture War 3.0 […]

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In response to my request for conservative/libertarian quotes earlier this week, Randy Webster gave us a good one of his own:   “A living Constitution is no Constitution.” Do you have any lines from this or other blogs that are destined for Bartlett quotation immortality? Preview Open

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