The NEA Is Openly Anti-American

 

One of the patron saints of the Democrat party, Greta Thunberg, Tweeted the following in December 2019:  “I’m sometimes called “political”.  But I’ve never supported any political party, politician, or ideology.  I communicate the science and the risks of failing to act on it.”  So she’s not political – she’s just trying to save the world.  Just like the anti-second amendment David Hogg seeks only to save lives, and is not interested in politics.  Right.  Ok.

Many leftist organizations use similar techniques to deflect criticism.  The NEA (National Education Association) is typical in this regard – check out the screenshot of their homepage.  They’re not political.  They just care about the kids.  How nice of them.  Of course, now that CRT (Critical Race Theory) has become a hot-button political issue, the NEA has taken a stand on this divisive issue.  They recently approved a plan “to “publicize” critical race theory and dedicate a “team of staffers” to assist union members looking to “fight back against anti-CRT rhetoric.”

Just in case you remain unconvinced that NEA is a purely political organization, their recent resolution also “calls for the union to “join with Black Lives Matter at School and the Zinn Education Project to call for a rally this year on Oct. 14 — George Floyd’s birthday — as a national day of action to teach lessons about structural racism and oppression.”  This should make clear the point that the NEA is little more than a political organization.  The presence of the Bidens at the NEA meeting should clarify that as well (see picture below).  The NEA teaming up with Zinn and BLM should also make clear which side they’re on.  And it’s not the American side.

If the NEA is based on educating children, you might wonder why they’re teaming up with organizations like Black Lives Matter, for a rally on George Floyd’s birthday.  How does this promote the education of children?

What do the NEA’s colleagues at Black Lives Matter and the Zinn Education Project have in common?  They are often viewed as fundamentally anti-American.  And the NEA hopes to organize a joint rally with these organizations on George Floyd’s birthday.

So here we have the President of the United States present at the meeting, and cheering on the president of America’s largest teachers’ union, as she announces a plan to team up with two openly anti-American organizations to stage a leftist political rally.  Does your blood not run cold?

The president of the NEA (Who, you probably will not be shocked to learn, is a black woman – can you imagine them electing a white male?), Becky Pringle, has this quote on the NEA homepage:

We didn’t just survive this year … We learned.  We grew.  We lifted up our voices and took action in ways that demonstrate our individual and collective power.   – Becky Pringle

Ok.  So the union members of the NEA took action and demonstrated their collective power.  Great.  What about teaching children how to read and do arithmetic?  Did they do that?  You might think that Ms. Pringle would mention that.  If that was an important part of the NEA mission.

Their website features a picture of the NEA president in a classroom with a group of smiling children.

Ha!  Just kidding, of course.  The only picture of the NEA president on their website (the mobile version, at least) features her at a political rally, shouting at people through a megaphone, Al Sharpton style.  The caption reads, “Advance justice with us.”

This is pure radical leftist imagery.  Imagine Mitch McConnel shouting at people through a megaphone – that would be “Republican attacks with hateful rhetoric.”  But when a black woman does it, she’s “Advancing justice.”

This is pure radical leftist imagery.  Featured prominently on the NEA homepage.

The NEA is not about children, any more than Black Lives Matter is about black lives, or the Zinn Education Project is about educating students about American History, or the environmental movement is about the environment, or the anti-second amendment movement is about gun safety.

They’re all just leftist political organizations.  Regardless of how they started.  Now, that’s all they are.  And as far left as today’s left has become, now they’re all just anti-American organizations.  That’s really it.

America’s founding principle of limiting government power doesn’t work with leftism.  So, as the left has moved further and further to the left over the past several years, leftist organizations have naturally become anti-American.  Leftists want to increase the power of government.  They can’t support a country that is based on limiting government power.

So these supposed “advocacy groups” like the NEA, Black Lives Matter, the environmental movement, the anti-second amendment movement, and so on – as they seek to use government power to advocate for whatever they promote – they naturally move further to the left (which wants increased government power) and further from America (which limits government power).

So advocacy groups tend to move left, as they seek to use government power to achieve their objectives.  And leftist groups tend to become anti-American, because the American Constitution limits government power.

So advocacy groups, over time, tend to become anti-American.  So there you go.

Does your blood not run cold?

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  1. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    I’d appreciate it if someone with more knowledge than me would fill in some blanks.  Are public school teachers required to join the NEA?  Are there individual states where this is a requirement?  If not, are there varying percentages of NEA membership across the country?

    • #1
  2. Addiction Is A Choice Member
    Addiction Is A Choice
    @AddictionIsAChoice

    Off-topic …. kind of:  The acronym A-C-A-B  (“All Cops Are Bastards.”)  Bastards?  That epithet hasn’t had any bite since the 1800s.  And since single-mothers are now an important Democrat constituency, being “born out of wedlock” is trumpeted as perfectly normal.  Plus you’d think a youth-culture as thoroughly vulgar as ours would have acronyms that are far more profane:  “ACAFPOS,” “ACADHMFS,” etc.  Bastards?  I don’t get it.

    • #2
  3. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    One problem I am having with your inciteful post, Doc—my blood is not running cold, it’s BOILING!

    • #3
  4. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    The state Education Edifice adds negative value. The purpose of education is to rip off the taxpayers and students, and for indoctrination. 

    If you simply cut a check to the parents, the aggregate value would go straight up.

    • #4
  5. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Dr. Bastiat: Zinn Education Project

    Think about it. It’s perfectly legal to teach Howard Zinn history in a school, but that is not enough. They want CRT psychological struggle sessions on top of that. 

    The good news is, it looks like they overdid it with CRT.

    • #5
  6. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    I’d appreciate it if someone with more knowledge than me would fill in some blanks. Are public school teachers required to join the NEA? Are there individual states where this is a requirement? If not, are there varying percentages of NEA membership across the country?

    I grew up in a farming community in SE Ohio.  My Mom taught high school English.  My Dad taught high school math later in life, after we lost our farm.  The school system was a ‘closed shop,’ meaning that you had to be in the union to be allowed to work there.  So all the teachers were in the union, and part of each paycheck went to the NEA.

    But it was a farming community, most of the teachers were conservative (like, all of them except for a few), and none of them liked paying dues to a union which they didn’t think represented them or their views.

    Here’s how unpopular the NEA was among teachers:  I remember once they had an election for NEA union representative among the teachers at Mom’s school.  Only one teacher ran for the position – call him “Tim.”  Tim was very pro-union, and he was not well liked by his co-workers.

    The election did not go well for Tim.  He voted for himself.  Absolutely no one else did.  Two people wrote in another teacher – “Bob.”  So Bob won, by a margin of two votes to one.  And Tim managed to lose an election for union rep, in which he was running unopposed.

    Bob hated the union, and refused to serve as union rep.  So they gave the job to the guy who came in second:  Tim.  So it all worked out, I guess.

    I wonder if Tim felt odd, representing his co-workers, absolutely none of whom voted for him.  Since he’s a typical union guy, I would guess that thought never crossed his mind.  It’s about power, however you can get it.  But of course, I don’t know if he wondered about that.

    But our teachers were all conservative, and all of them were paying union dues – automatically withdrawn from their check.  So they were spending a lot of their own money to support the Democrat party.  Because they had to.

    The teachers voted Republican, but their money voted Democrat.

    I’m not sure if that is still the case.

    • #6
  7. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    cdor (View Comment):

    One problem I am having with your inciteful post, Doc—my blood is not running cold, it’s BOILING!

    I prefer the word, “insightful.”  

    I don’t want the next Capitol riot blamed on me…

    • #7
  8. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    I’d appreciate it if someone with more knowledge than me would fill in some blanks. Are public school teachers required to join the NEA? Are there individual states where this is a requirement? If not, are there varying percentages of NEA membership across the country?

    I grew up in a farming community in SE Ohio. My Mom taught high school English. My Dad taught high school math later in life, after we lost our farm. The school system was a ‘closed shop,’ meaning that you had to be in the union to be allowed to work there. So all the teachers were in the union, and part of each paycheck went to the NEA.

    I’m thinking that’s still the case, but wonder if right-to-work legislation in a given state matters here.

    Of course, as you indicate, if most teachers are pro-union, it wouldn’t matter.

    • #8
  9. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    I’d appreciate it if someone with more knowledge than me would fill in some blanks. Are public school teachers required to join the NEA? Are there individual states where this is a requirement? If not, are there varying percentages of NEA membership across the country?

    I grew up in a farming community in SE Ohio. My Mom taught high school English. My Dad taught high school math later in life, after we lost our farm. The school system was a ‘closed shop,’ meaning that you had to be in the union to be allowed to work there. So all the teachers were in the union, and part of each paycheck went to the NEA.

    I’m thinking that’s still the case, but wonder if right-to-work legislation in a given state matters here.

    Of course, as you indicate, if the most teachers are pro-union, it wouldn’t matter.

     

    I’m not sure about that.  I wonder how many teachers across the country vote Democrat.  It’s probably less than 50%.  But I’ll bet it’s not as low as you might presume.

    Although, of course, I have no idea…

    • #9
  10. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    I’d appreciate it if someone with more knowledge than me would fill in some blanks. Are public school teachers required to join the NEA? Are there individual states where this is a requirement? If not, are there varying percentages of NEA membership across the country?

    Apparently, a recent Supreme Court decision has had an affect on this, holding that mandatory union fees in the public sector violate the right to free speech.  As of 2019, NEA membership had dropped by about 100,000 in the wake of the decision, there were still about 2,975,000 members.  That’s a lot of teachers.

    • #10
  11. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    I’d appreciate it if someone with more knowledge than me would fill in some blanks. Are public school teachers required to join the NEA? Are there individual states where this is a requirement? If not, are there varying percentages of NEA membership across the country?

    SC does not allow them to require membership.

    • #11
  12. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Zinn was a communist. CRT was created by a black Harvard law school woman who has written racist articles. Just like BLM, the CRT movement can’t withstand the accusation of Marxist. BLM scrubbed their website. CRT is trying to make the outlandish claim that they are anti-racism, the cure for racism, and those who oppose it are opposing anti-racism. Schools of Education have seen their primary mission for at least 20 years to be putting teachers in schools who will fight for social justice. They should be abolished. Let each college department mentor those who want to be teachers. 

    • #12
  13. Unsk Member
    Unsk
    @Unsk

    I am of the opinion that the vast majority of NEA  members engage in rampant child abuse seriously harming millions  of our young in a  deeply  psychological way.

    I have to disagree with Rufus. To my mind, the teaching of CRT and other Marxist  memes to our young is thoroughly  illegal and decidedly against our rights to equal protection under the Constitution.

    Since this Marxist indoctrination has been going on the better part of a century how would they like    it we turned the tables in the next century  where our   the schools  and Universities taught only patriotic history, the Christian and Jewish bibles, how  Uncle Joe stole the  election,  and how the  Democrat political policies of destroying the family,  over the top, unnecessary regulation have destroyed millions  of jobs particularly those of the   working class while at the same time drastically raised the cost of the living , particularly in housing costs, which have put the working and middle class into an never ending squeeze  which since it disproportionately  affects minorities is the real systemic racism of our time. And that is not to mention how  the Democrat’s banning of HCQ  and Ivermectin likely killed over   a half a million Americans during this pandemic. 

    • #13
  14. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Unsk (View Comment):
    how would they like    it we turned the tables in the next century  where our   the schools  and Universities taught only patriotic history, the Christian and Jewish bibles,

    That would be a return to the way education was and the textbooks they used the first century of the US. Even colleges were founded by churches.

    • #14
  15. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Unsk (View Comment):
    I have to disagree with Rufus. To my mind, the teaching of CRT and other Marxist  memes to our young is thoroughly  illegal and decidedly against our rights to equal protection under the Constitution.

    Just to be perfectly clear, I only

    said that Howard Zinn was legal in schools. It probably should be challenged legally, but this is over my head.

     

     

    Unsk (View Comment):
    Since this Marxist indoctrination has been going on the better part of a century how would they like    it we turned the tables in the next century  where our   the schools  and Universities taught only patriotic history, the Christian and Jewish bibles, how  Uncle Joe stole the  election,  and how the  Democrat political policies of destroying the family,  over the top, unnecessary regulation have destroyed millions  of jobs particularly those of the  working class while at the same time drastically raised the cost of the living , particularly in housing costs, which have put the working and middle class into an never ending squeeze  which since it disproportionately  affects minorities is the real systemic racism of our time. And that is not to mention how  the Democrat’s banning of HCQ  and Ivermectin likely killed over   a half a million Americans during this pandemic. 

    Well said.

     

     

    • #15
  16. cdor Member
    cdor
    @cdor

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    cdor (View Comment):

    One problem I am having with your inciteful post, Doc—my blood is not running cold, it’s BOILING!

    I prefer the word, “insightful.”

    I don’t want the next Capitol riot blamed on me…

    I was just using a diversionary tactic while attempting to assist those poor people locked in jail for trespassing–with no bail. 

    • #16
  17. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    So is the entire democrat (Socialist) party:

     

     

    • #17
  18. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Columbo (View Comment):

    So is the entire democrat (Socialist) party:

     

     

    This is very educational. lol

    • #18
  19. James Salerno Coolidge
    James Salerno
    @JamesSalerno

    This is where go-along-to-get-along Republicans fail to address the problem. We do not need public education reform. We need to abolish public education in it’s entirety. I groan whenever something like a 1776 project is proposed. It is the exact same thing as the 1619 project, just with supposed conservatives in charge instead. Centralized power is bad regardless of who is in charge. And the system that we have in place now, where there are no mechanisms in place to correct poor behavior, attracts leftists. For lack of a better term, “useless” people live for these kinds of professions. Just changing who is on top will not affect a damn thing.

    The system is rotten to the core and needs to be completely dismantled. 

    • #19
  20. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    This is where go-along-to-get-along Republicans fail to address the problem. We do not need public education reform. We need to abolish public education in it’s entirety. I groan whenever something like a 1776 project is proposed. It is the exact same thing as the 1619 project, just with supposed conservatives in charge instead. Centralized power is bad regardless of who is in charge. And the system that we have in place now, where there are no mechanisms in place to correct poor behavior, attracts leftists. For lack of a better term, “useless” people live for these kinds of professions. Just changing who is on top will not affect a damn thing.

    The system is rotten to the core and needs to be completely dismantled.

    More excellent analysis. 

    This is a really great post and thread.

    • #20
  21. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    This is where go-along-to-get-along Republicans fail to address the problem. We do not need public education reform. We need to abolish public education in it’s entirety. I groan whenever something like a 1776 project is proposed. It is the exact same thing as the 1619 project, just with supposed conservatives in charge instead. Centralized power is bad regardless of who is in charge. And the system that we have in place now, where there are no mechanisms in place to correct poor behavior, attracts leftists. For lack of a better term, “useless” people live for these kinds of professions. Just changing who is on top will not affect a damn thing.

    The system is rotten to the core and needs to be completely dismantled.

    Hopefully, this doesn’t sound like criticism, but the public school system will not be dismantled, although there’s probably hope for reforming some aspects of it.  We can’t assume it will go away, and need to direct resources to providing viable alternatives, such as school choice.

    • #21
  22. James Salerno Coolidge
    James Salerno
    @JamesSalerno

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    This is where go-along-to-get-along Republicans fail to address the problem. We do not need public education reform. We need to abolish public education in it’s entirety. I groan whenever something like a 1776 project is proposed. It is the exact same thing as the 1619 project, just with supposed conservatives in charge instead. Centralized power is bad regardless of who is in charge. And the system that we have in place now, where there are no mechanisms in place to correct poor behavior, attracts leftists. For lack of a better term, “useless” people live for these kinds of professions. Just changing who is on top will not affect a damn thing.

    The system is rotten to the core and needs to be completely dismantled.

    Hopefully, this doesn’t sound like criticism, but the public school system will not be dismantled, although there’s probably hope for reforming some aspects of it. We can’t assume it will go away, and need to direct resources to providing viable alternatives, such as school choice.

    Probably not, but never say never. The left didn’t take the reigns overnight, they’ve won small battles over a century or more. The problem isn’t who is in charge of the system, it’s the system itself. I agree that school choice is the way to go. We can win some small battles in the name of school choice and get the needle moving in the right direction. If we can do that enough to where momentum catches on, we could see a huge shift. Again, never say never.

    • #22
  23. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    Government school union leaders could care less about education or the children. They are completely political, angry and anti-American, anti-Men and anti-God. Just ask them.

    • #23
  24. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    This is where go-along-to-get-along Republicans fail to address the problem. We do not need public education reform. We need to abolish public education in it’s entirety. I groan whenever something like a 1776 project is proposed. It is the exact same thing as the 1619 project, just with supposed conservatives in charge instead. Centralized power is bad regardless of who is in charge. And the system that we have in place now, where there are no mechanisms in place to correct poor behavior, attracts leftists. For lack of a better term, “useless” people live for these kinds of professions. Just changing who is on top will not affect a damn thing.

    The system is rotten to the core and needs to be completely dismantled.

    Hopefully, this doesn’t sound like criticism, but the public school system will not be dismantled, although there’s probably hope for reforming some aspects of it. We can’t assume it will go away, and need to direct resources to providing viable alternatives, such as school choice.

    Probably not, but never say never. The left didn’t take the reigns overnight, they’ve won small battles over a century or more. The problem isn’t who is in charge of the system, it’s the system itself. I agree that school choice is the way to go. We can win some small battles in the name of school choice and get the needle moving in the right direction. If we can do that enough to where momentum catches on, we could see a huge shift. Again, never say never.

    If you just cut a check to the parents, the aggregate value would go straight up. That is just a fact. I don’t know about all of the political problems it would cause, but that is what the GOP stance should be. 

    • #24
  25. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Columbo (View Comment):

    Government school union leaders could care less about education or the children. They are completely political, angry and anti-American, anti-Men and anti-God. Just ask them.

    Yikes

    • #25
  26. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    If you like this discussion, you will like this. 

     

    https://ricochet.com/podcast/powerline/the-crisis-of-the-two-constitutions-with-charles-kesler/

     

     

    • #26
  27. Doctor Robert Member
    Doctor Robert
    @DoctorRobert

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    I’m not sure about that.  I wonder how many teachers across the country vote Democrat.  It’s probably less than 50%.  But I’ll bet it’s not as low as you might presume.

    Although, of course, I have no idea…

    I can’t imagine it’s less than 90%, Doc.  Here in the People’s Republic of Massachusetts, I don’t know any teachers who are not lefties. I used to review my kids’ American history lessons with “A Patriot’s History” just to even things out.  Pacific research gives it at 87% Dems.   https://www.pacificresearch.org/why-are-teachers-mostly-liberal/

    • #27
  28. Charlotte Member
    Charlotte
    @Charlotte

    Dr. Bastiat: Does your blood not run cold?

    All day, every day.

    • #28
  29. YouCantMeanThat Coolidge
    YouCantMeanThat
    @michaeleschmidt

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    (Snip)

    The system is rotten to the core and needs to be completely dismantled.

    Hopefully, this doesn’t sound like criticism, but the public school system will not be dismantled, although there’s probably hope for reforming some aspects of it. We can’t assume it will go away, and need to direct resources to providing viable alternatives, such as school choice.

    Returning schools to state control by eliminating the (unconstitutional, hint, hint*) Department of Education would be relatively easy — and should have been done during the four years prior to the present. Continuing the roll-up from the state level to the local level could follow. School choice, even where it exists, is problematic until school taxes are abolished, and they’re at the local level. I see ANY program of grants to parents being rapidly co-opted, in addition to being just as unconstitutional as that which we have now.

    *Where, oh where, are Our Lawyers(tm)?

    • #29
  30. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    YouCantMeanThat (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    (Snip)

    The system is rotten to the core and needs to be completely dismantled.

    Hopefully, this doesn’t sound like criticism, but the public school system will not be dismantled, although there’s probably hope for reforming some aspects of it. We can’t assume it will go away, and need to direct resources to providing viable alternatives, such as school choice.

    Returning schools to state control by eliminating the (unconstitutional, hint, hint*) Department of Education would be relatively easy — and should have been done during the four years prior to the present. Continuing the roll-up from the state level to the local level could follow. School choice, even where it exists, is problematic until school taxes are abolished, and they’re at the local level. I see ANY program of grants to parents being rapidly co-opted, in addition to being just as unconstitutional as that which we have now.

    *Where, oh where, are Our Lawyers(tm)?

    The Department of Education doesn’t need to be found unconstitutional. Just find it what it is: an expensive, bloated bureaucracy that can be adjudged a failure based on its results.

    • #30
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