Does Rationing Start With Breast Cancer Patients?

 

No one ever said hope and change would be easy.  Why, even from the 8th hole at a posh vacation spot in Maine, and coming soon to Martha’s Vineyard, the president can see the need for shared sacrifice.  It’s just as plain as the wings on the jet that flew the president’s puppy dog in to vacation with the rest of the First Family.  You’ve got to hand it to them — they spare no expense to keep the common touch. 

So where do we start with the serious business of shared sacrifice?  Official perks?  Maybe a Treasury Secretary that pays his taxes?  Too ambitious.  How about breast cancer patients?  There’s the ticket.  

The folks at Breitbart’s Big Government are breaking the story that the Food and Drug Administration plans to take the anti-cancer drug Avastin “off-label,” meaning that most insurance companies and Medicare itself will no longer cover the treatment’s cost.  Meaning it will be available only to the sort of people Obama will be sharing sacrifice with at Martha’s Vineyard.

A Stage 4 drug, Avastin is the first of its kind that actually blocks the growth of blood vessels that feed tumors.  It isn’t a cure, but it can stop the growth of cancer, extending the patient’s life by five months on average.  And that’s where Avastin runs smack into the Obama Administration’s cost / benefit analysis. 

The current leadership of the FDA doesn’t look at “endpoints” to evaluate whether a drug is achieving it’s targeted results.  Rather, another more amorphous judgement is made as to whether a drug is “Clinically Meaningful.”  In this case, extending the life of someone’s mother or daughter, wife or grandmother by another few months just isn’t “Clinically Meaningful” in the federal government’s judgement.  As the President said during the health care debate, give Grandma a pain pill and send her home.  The term “bleeding heart” is starting to taken on a more ominous meaning, wouldn’t you say?  Hope and change can be an ugly business.

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  1. Profile Photo Inactive
    @MelFoil

    That’s government healthcare. That’s the direction it goes. You’re not the customer anymore. It may be important to YOU to live the extra four months it will take to see and hold your first grandchild, but “how will society as a whole benefit?” “Tough luck Grandma…or rather, Almost Grandma. Here’s our hospice list.”

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  2. Profile Photo Member
    @GwenNovak

    I’m glad someone brought this up because I’ve been wondering if anyone had any good ideas on what to do now that obamacare is here. I mean people keep talking about repeal but won’t the millions who are going to lose their current coverage make that politically unfeasible?

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    @KayBee

    I am a three-time breast cancer survivor, the mother of two preteens, and a “homemaker.” That means that 3 times now, I have cost my insurance company a bunch of money (I still do, for the medications I currently take). It is only a matter of time before Obamacare limits the care I can receive, most likely by using the argument that I have used up my quota of care–particularly since I am not “contributing” to the economy as a worker. Will I see my grandkids? That probably depends on whether I get a fourth diagnosis. I am definitely frightened for my medical future under Obamacare.

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    @oleneo65

    Why aren’t those who are focused upon repealing Obamacare putting together a PR blitz featuring the cruel reality of this socialist system. Why do we continue to allow opposition to Obamacare to be framed as ‘cruel and heartless’?

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    @DaveCarter

    KayBee, I have a very dear friend of over 30 years who called a few days ago to give me the good news that, A) her son had just arrived back in the states after a tour of duty in Afghanistan in the Marines, and B) she completed her breast cancer treatments and is in the clear for now.  Her story, and yours, are stories of triumph.  Triumph of the human spirit and of the capacity of free people to gain ground over illnesses that were once thought insurmountable. 

    The dead weight of government bureaucracy, with its draconian formulas about who does and does not get treatment, its reduction of individuals to faceless groups who are nothing more than game pieces on a utopian chess board, is ghastly.  That it is all done under the banner of universal rights is tragic. 

    For your sake, for my friend’s sake, for our sake, this hideous law must be repealed and its enforcement mechanisms defunded as soon as humanly possible.  God bless, KayBee.  I hope you have many happy years with your children, grandchildren, the whole wonderful bunch. 

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  6. Profile Photo Inactive
    @KayBee

    Thank you, Dave!

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  7. Profile Photo Member
    @GwenNovak

    KayBee-

    I didn’t mean to make light of your situation. Cancer has unfortunately touched many people in my family. I too hope your have many years with your family.

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    @GeorgeSavage
    Gwen Novak: I’m glad someone brought this up because I’ve been wondering if anyone had any good ideas on what to do now that obamacare is here. I mean people keep talking about repeal but won’t the millions who are going to lose their current coverage make that politically unfeasible? · Jul 27 at 2:41pm

    Gwen, We have a shot. The statists delayed implementation of most of ObamaCare until after the next presidential election. They are counting on our anger flickering out like a dying candle long before then. If they can work for eighty years to bring us lifelong government dependence, we can stoke the fires of righteous indignation for a couple more years. We must repeal ObamaCare and implement free market reforms addressing the very real problems with the current system.

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    @DavidWard

    I’m a Canadian and have lived in Canada my whole life, so I’ve never had the right to seek any different care. I was always very skeptical of the public health care system here, but became even more so when I became an amputation victim of rationing care. As mentioned above, a public health care system means that the patient is not the customer, so the hospital or clinic is ultimately responsible to the health board and does not really care at all about patients. It sure doesn’t make me feel vindicated to hear some bureaucrat say “mistakes were made” as a half-hearted apology. I wish there had been some way to show/warn Americans exactly how bad things will get with the new beloved Obamacare.

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    @DavidWard

    Public health care is about good secure union jobs mainly. One of the ladies I know in town is training at the college to be an LPN, and part of the curriculum is learning the union line about how important protecting AB Health Care is, while allowing no private care. I don’t have any problem with unions speaking to students, but having the class instructor parrot the union’s message as ‘education’ is not cool in my books.

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