Contributor Post Created with Sketch. In Fairness to the New York Times …

 

They are hardly ignoring the situation in Ciudad Juárez today. As for the emphasis of the article, I’m sympathetic to the reporter’s decision that it might be a better idea to talk to local retail businessmen than to interview local drug kingpins, really I am. 

The Times is also reporting on the Kushchevskaya massacre in Russia and its implications–a hugely important story, and I don’t think anyone else is covering it. 

On the other hand, the five-arugula-alert piece in the travel section about the next-big-thing in off-piste skiing in Switzerland does not precisely suggest a finger on the national pulse. 

There are 13 comments.

  1. Profile Photo Member

    1. The Texas-Mexico border is totally different than it was ten years ago. My Mexican-American aquaintances who used to routinely visit Nuevo Laredo or Piedras Negras no longer even consider it.

    2. The first I’ve heard of the massacre in Russia. Probably the last, too,

    3. Have read the article. Still not clear on what off-piste skiing really is.

    Meanwhile, the Times asks us, re Elizabeth Edwards:

    “The goddess of frumpy wives and older mothers?

    “The cancer patient who would not be defined by her disease?

    “The noble, betrayed wife?

    “The political operative whose complicity in covering up her husband’s infidelity could have cost the Democratic Party the presidency?

    “A modern Job? Or Icarus?”

    • #1
    • December 12, 2010, at 5:16 AM PST
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  2. Ward Inactive

    Its a good day when there is more in NYT to get the reader “off-piste” than “piste-off” sorry couldn’t resist. It is a mystery to me that the drug war in Mexico has gotten such scant attention in the press so glad to see the NYT covering it and they didn’t even go out of their way to tell us how ignorant the people who don’t live in Manhattan are.

    • #2
    • December 12, 2010, at 6:14 AM PST
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  3. outstripp Inactive
    mesquito: …3. Have read the article. Still not clear on what off-piste skiing really is.

    off-piste

    adjective & adverb

    Skiing away from prepared ski runs : [as adj. ] challenging expanses of off-piste skiing.

    or for our Japanese readers

    óff-píste

    形容詞〘スキー〙コースからはずれた.

    • #3
    • December 12, 2010, at 6:59 AM PST
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  4. Profile Photo Member

    .

    outstripp

    Skiing away from prepared ski runs : [as adj. ] challenging expanses of off-piste skiing.

    . · Dec 12 at 5:59am

    Okay. It’s what my Norwegian mum did before she immigrated and saw her first ski-lift. In Vermont.

    • #4
    • December 12, 2010, at 7:11 AM PST
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  5. Duane Oyen Member
    Duane Oyen Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    If they had any news sense whatever, they’d publish an analysis of the relationship between global warming and the deluge ogf snow that collapsed the Minneapolis football stadium’s roof this morning.

    • #5
    • December 12, 2010, at 8:06 AM PST
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  6. Ken Sweeney Inactive

    I was in Aspen earlier this year and discovered several steeps with an off-piste architecture. But I guess staying in the US would be too provincial for the NYT.

    Perhaps because I am an avid skier, I withhold the “five-arugula-alert” rating system for helicopter skiing.

    • #6
    • December 12, 2010, at 8:19 AM PST
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  7. Kennedy Smith Inactive

    It’s a sad reflection on our Times that we’ve moved from extreme sports to pissed off skiing.

    • #7
    • December 12, 2010, at 8:27 AM PST
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  8. nordman Inactive

    The New York Times is dead to me. I cannot relate to its apologists at all.

    Off-piste skiing is nothing new. But is does work well as an exotic marketing term for Patagonia and other upscale outdoors retailers targeting people who have money to burn.

    ‘Off piste’ is also known as Backcountry, Telemark, Randonee, and just plain old ‘Touring’ . Those are just some of its many flavors. It’s the groomed run, ski lift experience that’s the newcomer to the milleniums-old skiing scene.

    So forgive me when I snicker at the NYT crowd for considering ‘off-piste’ the latest greatest ‘new thing’.

    • #8
    • December 12, 2010, at 8:53 AM PST
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  9. flownover Inactive

    Nice post, won’t comment on the Mexico part as it’s so sad for someone who likes to go there a couple times a year.

    The Russian article was great, although I was waiting for Hedley Lamar and Mongo to show up and terrorize the town.

    Looked like the plot scenario for about half of the westerns I have seen in my life.

    Ten people in Russia sort of pales in comparison to what’s happening in Mexico. Que lastima ………..

    Nothing much changes does it ?

    • #9
    • December 13, 2010, at 1:48 AM PST
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  10. Sisyphus Coolidge
    Sisyphus Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Wow. Imagine it. A Conservative site whose contributors reflect a near universal obsession with an undead New York newspaper that frittered away its credibility on the beads and trinkets that make up the American left-wing. I think I’ll call it…Ricochet.

    • #10
    • December 13, 2010, at 2:55 AM PST
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  11. Lady Kurobara Inactive
    Sisyphus: Wow. Imagine it. A Conservative site whose contributors reflect a near universal obsession with an undead New York newspaper that frittered away its credibility on the beads and trinkets that make up the American left-wing. I think I’ll call it…Ricochet.

    “In fairness to The New York Times,” I will concede that, on cool, cloudy days, the Dead Gray Lady does not stink as badly as on warm, sunny days.

    Why are we even wasting a thread on the irrelevant old rag?

    I am interested in The New York Times only if the Obama administration decides to give it a bailout. That will be a big story.

    • #11
    • December 13, 2010, at 6:20 AM PST
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  12. Lady Kurobara Inactive

    Here is an interesting observation (by Lauren Zalaznick) about The New York Times:

    “For almost 15 years, I’ve catalogued various things. Obsessively, some would say. Specifically, I spent three years, every day, sorting various articles in The New York Times by topic, correlated to the gender (and race, where possible) of the journalist. Three years of obituaries, Op-Ed columns, and the covers of the Sunday Magazine section. I guess I wanted to see how the ultimate arbiter of news and information filtered the voices chosen to represent the culture at large.

    “On the obits page, only 16 percent of the deaths reported on were women. The most common profession of the female dead, even filtered for women under 45 to take into account the changing social and professional status since 1960, was acting (which included “silent film star” and “burlesque dancer”). Writers/journalists was the second most common. And a combination of “socialite,” “philanthropist,” and wife-of-a-rich-or-famous man was third.”

    You can read the full article here:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2010-12-11/lauren-zalaznick-the-bravo-and-oxygen-chief-on-the-inequities-of-flying-first-class/?cid=hp:mainpromo9

    • #12
    • December 13, 2010, at 9:23 AM PST
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  13. Cas Balicki Inactive

    Out here off-piste skiing is more commonly know as racing avalanches.

    • #13
    • December 13, 2010, at 12:41 PM PST
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