May Day: Indianapolis 500

 

The 105th running of the Indianapolis 500 was glorious. It was the fastest qualifying field ever and the fastest ever race on the track. And, a wonderfully positive, emotional driving star won his fourth Indy 500 checkered flag in a race that was a battle to the very last lap. The race was largely unmarred by accidents and was run entirely under bright blue skies. The very best part: the 105th running of the Indianapolis 500 was before a full stadium of unmuzzled fans.

This great American tradition, signaling the start of summer, was a loud rejection of the entire leftist agenda, with the sweet smell of racing fuel and hot tires savored by Americans shoulder to shoulder in the sunshine without any sign of leftist plandemic fear and virtue signaling face coverings in the sea of normal humanity. The cherry on top was the winner; Helio Castroneves won at age 46.

True, there was a scattering of masks, frequently pulled down, in the press and event officiating crew. Yet, there was no solidarity in that stance. The masks have dropped. The official story was that track management limited fans to 40 percent, in submission to so-called public health officials or “experts.” On camera, it looked like the stands were full.

Helio Castroneves, a Brazilian driver, did his signature climb of the chain-link safety fence, joined by his team to wave at the crowd. He name-checked Tom Brady and Phil Mickelson in his remarks, associating with them as old guys beating the kids this year. Like Phil Mickelson, it has been many years since Helio Castroneves last won at the Brickyard. He won his third Indy 500 in 2009. It was 1991 the last time a driver won a fourth Indianapolis 500.

The Brazilian joined A.J. Foyt, Al Unser Sr. and Rick Mears, his former mentor at Team Penske, as the only four-time winners of “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” Mears was the last driver to join the club in 1991.

Castroneves won his third 500 in 2009 and has been chasing win No. 4 ever since.

Al Unser, Sr. still holds the record for oldest Indy 500 winner, with his 1987 victory just shy of his 48th birthday.

The three-time 500 champ arrived at the track without a ride.

But when a practice crash sidelined Danny Ongais, Roger Penske called on the veteran.

With no spare car, the team retrieved a 1986 March-Cosworth on display at a Pennsylvania hotel for Unser to drive.

Big Al took the lead in the 183rd lap and just five days before his 48th birthday captured his 4th Indy 500 title.

The 105th running of the Indianapolis 500 was a good prelude to Memorial Day Monday, setting the tone of Americans coming together in large traditional public events, not cultural elite leftist approved mass events.

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  1. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Stop by and sign up now for June’s theme: “Journeys.”

    There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, now managed by @she. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim a day of the month to write on a proposed theme. This is an easy way to expose your writing to a general audience, with a bit of accountability and topical guidance to encourage writing for its own sake.

    Interested in Group Writing topics that came before? See the handy compendium of monthly themes. Check out links in the Group Writing Group. You can also join the group to get a notification when a new monthly theme is posted.

    • #1
  2. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I celebrate every sign of a return to normal! Good for them!

    • #2
  3. Randy Webster Member
    Randy Webster
    @RandyWebster

    Clifford A. Brown: under bight blue skies

    There was a knot in them?

    • #3
  4. Randy Webster Member
    Randy Webster
    @RandyWebster

    I used to go watch my brother race motorcycles.  The testosterone was so thick you could cut it with a knife.  I imagine the Indy was the same way.

    • #4
  5. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Randy Webster (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: under bight blue skies

    There was a knot in them?

    The race went off without a half-hitch.

    • #5
  6. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I remember seeing Helio on “Dancing With the Stars” (yes, I actually liked it once) several years ago, and he was such a delight! He was positive and enthusiastic, so I can understand why the fans love him.

    • #6
  7. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    I remember seeing Helio on “Dancing With the Stars” (yes, I actually liked it once) several years ago, and he was such a delight! He was positive and enthusiastic, so I can understand why the fans love him.

    His website has a page dedicated to all the video clips of his performances on Dancing with the Stars. His stated mission, in the first episode, was to make his professional dance partner, defending champion, a two time champion, just as he had won back-to-back Indy 500 races. They won.

    • #7
  8. Chris Oler Coolidge
    Chris Oler
    @ChrisO

    Clifford A. Brown: The official story was that track management limited fans to 40 percent, in submission to so-called public health officials or “experts.” On camera, it looked like the stands were full.

    They closed off the infield, so no Snake Pit. Makes sense, I mean that area is always a public health hazard, pandemic or not. 

    • #8