The In-Between Times

 

In a sense (although some would argue otherwise), we are in that in-between time as a nation. It’s difficult to pinpoint when we “began the ending” of our nation, but when the Left became more blatant in their accomplishments, expectations, and efforts, the period of our naivete came to an end. And we entered the in-between time.

Now we are keenly aware that our democracy has been wounded by outliers that somehow made dangerous inroads to our governance and culture. We watched them do it, and tried to ignore that things were changing, particularly in education. We trusted our teachers and our schools to “take care of” our children, but our reliance on them was misguided. The time may have existed when we could count on them, but we didn’t notice when the education agenda for our children became their propaganda mandate.

So here we are.

The primary problem is that we know the place where we are now is treacherous and anti-democratic. It is meant to destroy the hearts and minds of the men and women of our country so that the Leftist idealists can mold them into creatures of their own making. We know in our minds and souls that this is immoral, inhuman, and self-serving, no matter how they try to promote it. But if you are like me, you’re getting tired. The fight is daily, almost hourly in every segment of our culture: corporate, educational, and technological; it’s ubiquitous. And we see the efforts to fight back, but those who would destroy us are inured to our protests and refuse to consider that their efforts are flawed and hopeless—hopeless, because ultimately, they will fail.

What do I mean by “fail”? This country has principles that are so deeply rooted in our culture that, although they may destroy the exterior of institutions that we so love—memorials, the courts, the education system—that even if their work causes chaos and desolation, the roots will eventually throw out new growth—and with it, possibility.

The key moment is now, though, for us to survive the in-between time. Like the Hebrews in the desert, who rebelled and were forced to endure the wilderness for another 40 years after their exodus from Egypt, we, too, must find a way to survive this in-between time. Malaise will slip into our psyches; we may become paralyzed with exhaustion. We may just feel that we might as well resign ourselves to a disappointing future.

But we have to resist that temptation. We must encourage each other. We must stimulate creativity even though it will be discouraged. We must protest injustice against the rule of law and the Constitution. We must find ways to strengthen our resilience against hopelessness and fear.

The in-between time can be one of growth, too. It can help us toughen ourselves, to project a better future with practical and yet creative ideas. We can use it to deepen our relationships at all levels: families, religious communities, service groups, volunteer opportunities, where we can be inspired and motivated by like-minded people.

The in-between time is a time to be strong and single-minded.

It is time to be patriotic.

It is a time to be brave.

Then we will be prepared to start anew.

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  1. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    This has happened before. By the Democrats. In 1859-60.

    I recommend everyone read (0r re-read) Our Man in Charleston and Madness Rules the Hour. We are not quite there yet, but whether or not we get there depends on the good will of Democrats – and that is in as short supply today as it was in 1860. 

    A new American Civil War will likely resemble the Spanish Civil War more than either the first American Civil War or Bosnia. Why? Because the Woke strongholds are largely centered in large cities, university towns and state capitols. Since these are plum-puddinged across the United States we won’t get the regional divisions of the American Civil War. But since they are concentrated in urban areas we won’t get the neighborhood against neighborhood battles of Bosnia or Beruit. Rather we will get the rural-urban distribution seen in the Spanish Civil War.

     

    • #1
  2. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Susan Quinn: The time may have existed when we could count on them, but we didn’t notice when the education agenda for our children became their propaganda mandate.

    My parents and at least one grandparent were complaining about it when I was starting school in the early 50s. I didn’t understand all of what they were getting at. For example, I didn’t understand why teaching social studies was a bad replacement for teaching history, and still don’t completely agree. But they were spot on in some respects.  I know they didn’t like the worshipful treatment of FDR, or of progressive ideas like the managerial form of municipal government. I didn’t understand until many years later why, but it was distasteful to me at an early age, probably because my parents were attuned to threats to “government by the people.” 

    For one of my education classes in college in the late 60s I did a paper on the change over time in the teaching of some historical topic. I no longer remember which one, but it was a theme my parents had been harping on in the 50s. For my paper I decided to play it straight: just document the changes without making it a political rant. Got an A for my effort.

     

    • #2
  3. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Seawriter (View Comment):
    Rather we will get the rural-urban distribution seen in the Spanish Civil War.

    Very interesting. I didn’t know there was such a divide in the Spanish Civil War. (I’m not sure where I get the idea that I know something about history.)

    • #3
  4. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Seawriter (View Comment):
    Rather we will get the rural-urban distribution seen in the Spanish Civil War.

    Very interesting. I didn’t know there was such a divide in the Spanish Civil War. (I’m not sure where I get the idea that I know something about history.)

    I am old enough to remember when Johnny Carson had guests who’d mention in world-weary tones that they had gone to Spain during the Spanish Civil War.  There was no need for them to explain which side they had been on. 

    • #4
  5. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: The time may have existed when we could count on them, but we didn’t notice when the education agenda for our children became their propaganda mandate.

    My parents and at least one grandparent were complaining about it when I was starting school in the early 50s. I didn’t understand all of what they were getting at. For example, I didn’t understand why teaching social studies was a bad replacement for teaching history, and still don’t completely agree. But they were spot on in some respects. I know they didn’t like the worshipful treatment of FDR, or of progressive ideas like the managerial form of municipal government. I didn’t understand until many years later why, but it was distasteful to me at an early age, probably because my parents were attuned to threats to “government by the people.”

    For one of my education classes in college in the late 60s I did a paper on the change over time in the teaching of some historical topic. I no longer remember which one, but it was a theme my parents had been harping on in the 50s. For my paper I decided to play it straight: just document the changes without making it a political rant. Got an A for my effort.

     

    That is fascinating, @thereticulator. My parents didn’t discuss those kinds of things around us, that I can remember. but I’m intrigued by your tracing a shift in the 50’s. I’ll have to think about that.

    • #5
  6. DonG (2+2=5. Say it!) Coolidge
    DonG (2+2=5. Say it!)
    @DonG

    About 100 years ago (1919) we had:  Red Summer (3,000+ Americans killed in racial violence with open gun battles in the streets.); the ultimate Karen encroachment of civil rights (banning sale of alcohol drinks); the establishment of a national communist party; and we had the tail end of a legitimate pandemic (Spanish Flu).  Heck we even had a brain-dead super-Leftist president in White House (Wilson)!    America survived that.  The Constitution is robust.  Be hopeful and eager for the fray.

    • #6
  7. CACrabtree Coolidge
    CACrabtree
    @CACrabtree

    DonG (2+2=5. Say it!) (View Comment):

    About 100 years ago (1919) we had: Red Summer (3,000+ Americans killed in racial violence with open gun battles in the streets.); the ultimate Karen encroachment of civil rights (banning sale of alcohol drinks); the establishment of a national communist party; and we had the tail end of a legitimate pandemic (Spanish Flu). Heck we even had a brain-dead super-Leftist president in White House (Wilson)! America survived that. The Constitution is robust. Be hopeful and eager for the fray.

    “Eager for the fray”.

    That will be the key.  I don’t wish to be pessimistic but I’m not seeing much of that. Maybe I’m looking in the wrong places.

    • #7
  8. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    DonG (2+2=5. Say it!) (View Comment):

    About 100 years ago (1919) we had: Red Summer (3,000+ Americans killed in racial violence with open gun battles in the streets.); the ultimate Karen encroachment of civil rights (banning sale of alcohol drinks); the establishment of a national communist party; and we had the tail end of a legitimate pandemic (Spanish Flu). Heck we even had a brain-dead super-Leftist president in White House (Wilson)! America survived that. The Constitution is robust. Be hopeful and eager for the fray.

    I predict there will be a revival of our Constitution, not unlike the Christian revivals this country has seen over its existence.  It won’t come from the left, but the leaders will come from the right.  Our Constitution is certainly robust – why do you think the Dems want to pack the Supreme Court?  They recognize the importance of the Constitution, even with their watering down of general, public education on it in our schools . . .

    • #8
  9. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Onward Judeo-Christian Soldiers. 

    • #9
  10. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Onward Judeo-Christian Soldiers.

    I’ll take just about any kind of soldiers who will fight for us!! ;-)

    • #10
  11. Barfly Member
    Barfly
    @Barfly

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: The time may have existed when we could count on them, but we didn’t notice when the education agenda for our children became their propaganda mandate.

    My parents and at least one grandparent were complaining about it when I was starting school in the early 50s. I didn’t understand all of what they were getting at. For example, I didn’t understand why teaching social studies was a bad replacement for teaching history, and still don’t completely agree. But they were spot on in some respects. I know they didn’t like the worshipful treatment of FDR, or of progressive ideas like the managerial form of municipal government. I didn’t understand until many years later why, but it was distasteful to me at an early age, probably because my parents were attuned to threats to “government by the people.”

    For one of my education classes in college in the late 60s I did a paper on the change over time in the teaching of some historical topic. I no longer remember which one, but it was a theme my parents had been harping on in the 50s. For my paper I decided to play it straight: just document the changes without making it a political rant. Got an A for my effort.

    I started school in the mid ’60’s, in a rural county in Virginia. By the fourth grade I was aware something was horribly wrong, and I remember coming to that awareness in the classroom. 

    My point is, this modern wokeness has been with us for a long time, longer than I’ve been alive. Like acne after a chocolate binge, it’s erupting now and everyone can see it. I shake my head in wonder at how far it had to go for people to wake up.

    • #11
  12. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    Barfly (View Comment):
    I shake my head in wonder at how far it had to go for people to wake up.

    I’m not. Most people are content to let others live their own lives, no matter what crackpot notions those others have. Live and let live. What it takes to wake the folk willing to live and let live up is when they get actively forced to follow what they believe are crackpot notions.

    The Woke have been with us forever. They are cut from by same mold intolerant bigots have always been cut, whether we are talking about Carrie Nation, or the Grand Kleegal of the Ku Klux Klan. It is only since the 2016 election that the Woke have had enough influence to force their bigotries on average people, really only since January of this year. However, that has happened before. The intemperate Temperance movement let to Prohibition which was eventually repealed, Similarly, despite the power of the Klan in the 1920s, they were eventually squashed, largely by the end of the 1930s.  

    • #12
  13. Eridemus Coolidge
    Eridemus
    @Eridemus

    About that education thing: Here is a quote from a few days ago on a forum for my profession, by a FACULTY member at a university who teaches the subject. He is SO CONCERNED for his students, that

    I guess we could educate students for a world where acceptance of, and attempted adaptation to, climate disaster and environmental destruction is the mainstream response. This seems to be the current default position. However, (WE) should want no part of a world that simply accepts the greatest human rights violation ever perpetrated. (Our field) is an instrument greatly needed to help us to reverse these crises. If it is to be, we have to get real about teaching to the new realities ASAP. A great deal of today’s curriculum would be recognized by students of 50 years ago or longer and is suited for a planet and society that no longer exists. The longer it takes us, the more planetary systemic disruptions will occur, which will make it that much harder for today’s students to succeed. I will do my part to help them.

    Because

    The protectors and purveyors of systematic racism in the US seem hell bent on ensuring the country disintegrates into violence and hatred rather than see any challenge to White rule for the benefit of corporations.

    Which all led to Eridemus making a first ever mini public political response that I hope all he spewed had no impact on his teaching, since surely he’s aware corporations are the ones buying into critical race theory and antifa and allies are stirring up the strongest racial tensions? Not much but I thought it might start a discussion. I came back a few days later and no one had responded to either of us.

    • #13
  14. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Eridemus (View Comment):
    Which all led to Eridemus making a first ever mini public political response that I hope all he spewed had no impact on his teaching, since surely he’s aware corporations are the ones buying into critical race theory and antifa and allies are stirring up the strongest racial tensions? Not much but I thought it might start a discussion. I came back a few days later and no one had responded to either of us.

    Good for you! Sometimes all our worry of being hanged for our words is for naught. Sorry no one responded at all @eridemus!

    • #14
  15. Eridemus Coolidge
    Eridemus
    @Eridemus

    Besides the professor (middle aged white guy) being on the left, the poor thinking just baffled me. How in the world would it help “corporations” keep their “white power” by making average people (who don’t make corporate decisions anyway) harbor racial hatred? and why would corporations engage in fostering it? I think the main thing fueling any wariness and opposition to the race baiters can be found in the actions of whoever is pushing far left reading materials on our public schools (including critical race theory).

    • #15
  16. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Eridemus (View Comment):

    Besides the professor (middle aged white guy) being on the left, the poor thinking just baffled me. How in the world would it help “corporations” keep their “white power” by making average people (who don’t make corporate decisions anyway) harbor racial prejudice? and why would corporations engage in fostering it?

    Trying to make sense of the thinking of the Left is your first mistake. Maybe we could help them clarify their ideas, but they refuse to engage with us, allowing them to live in their delusional ivory tower. Oh well.

    • #16
  17. RightMidTX Coolidge
    RightMidTX
    @RightMidTX

    Somehow I ended up watching the first episode of “All in the Family” last night (it was on YouTube).

    I was struck by the arguments between Archie and Michael…they were almost identical to what we hear nowadays. This episode aired nearly fifty years ago.

    I was a young boy at the time but that series was the first one in a long series of TV sitcoms in the 70s and 80s that largely denigrated southern/military/police/Christian men. 

    Those of us from that era have thus been conditioned by media in a way that’s probably irreversible and worsening with ubiquitous social media.

    I wonder if we hated each other more or less when the world was quieter. 

    • #17