It’s Time for Liz Cheney to Go

 

House Republicans kept Liz Cheney in her leadership role by a secret vote in February. If there’s a vote in May, she won’t be so lucky.

The Wyoming representative angered many in the base when she joined nine other Republicans to impeach President Donald Trump for his role in the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol. As House Republican Conference chair, she holds the third-highest position in minority leadership. Trump supporters found it a betrayal of their party.

Cheney avoided removal with a 145-61 vote in her favor. Anyone with a hint of political acumen or leadership instincts would start mending fences, uniting the caucus, and moving forward. Cheney chose the opposite.

She crowed about her victory at the time and worsened her position ever since. Every few weeks, Cheney popped up in the news, always to condemn Donald Trump and the majority of Republicans who supported him.

The last straw came Monday. Speaking at an off-the-record AEI conference in Sea Island, GA, Cheney said: “We can’t embrace the notion the election is stolen. It’s a poison in the bloodstream of our democracy. We can’t whitewash what happened on January 6 or perpetuate Trump’s big lie. It is a threat to democracy. What he did on January 6 is a line that cannot be crossed.”

These comments were leaked, as Cheney expected. They were preceded earlier in the day with her tweet: “The 2020 presidential election was not stolen. Anyone who claims it was is spreading THE BIG LIE, turning their back on the rule of law, and poisoning our democratic system.”

As after every Cheney comment in the past three months, Republicans and pundits are attacking each other, relitigating the 2016 and 2020 elections, and fretting about Trump’s future moves.

If House leadership’s job is to divide its own party, Cheney would be a perfect fit. But Republican Conference Chairs are supposed to unite the team and take the fight to Democrats. You know, the party that controls the House, the Senate, and the White House, and is jamming through a radical progressive agenda.

On substance, I agree with Cheney. The election was not stolen and Trump’s Jan. 6 incitement merited impeachment. But all that is history. The GOP’s job today is to stop Joe Biden, Nancy Pelosi, and Chuck Schumer. In that fight — the only fight that matters six months after the election — Cheney is AWOL.

Say I bought a sweet 1967 Ford Mustang. Candy apple red, 320 horses, lovingly restored. But six months ago, my wife borrowed it, ran a stop sign, and totaled the car. I would be upset. We would have a long, painful talk. I would sulk for a few weeks then buy a boring used Honda to replace it.

Then my wife asks me to drop off the kids at school, I reply, “Oh, should I bring them in my crappy Accord I had to buy because you destroyed my beautiful Mustang?!

When she asks if I want anything from Starbucks, I say, “how about a hot Venti Ford-uccino? Do they have one of those?

“Ugh, Jon. the stylist wrecked my hair.”

“Speaking of wrecks…”

“Jon, that was six months ago. Can we please move on?”

“We can’t embrace the notion that you didn’t wreck my car. It’s a poison in the bloodstream of our marriage. We can’t whitewash what happened to my Mustang! What you did to my car was a line that cannot be crossed!”

Everything sulky Jon said above was accurate. Nothing was helpful, intelligent, or useful to our relationship.

The wife would be right to file for divorce. And it’s time to file papers on Rep. Cheney.

This mess isn’t just about Liz Cheney, the House GOP, or Beltway pundits. Cheney was hired to represent the people of Wyoming and she refuses to do it.

In a just-released poll, Wyoming Republican primary voters oppose her 29% to 65%. Fifty-two percent would vote against her regardless of the challenger. This is hardly surprising since the state chose Trump over Biden 70.4% to 26.7%. Trump’s margin was higher than Cheney’s in 2020.

It’s not as if she is bitterly holding on in a blue state. Wyoming’s lower house is 51-9 GOP and the senate is 28-2 GOP. You could paint an R on a stray cat and voters would send it to the US Capitol over a Democrat.

Most GOP representatives would do a better job as Chair today and Cheney will likely be removed from the House by her own constituents 18 months from now. The job should go to a Republican who wants to achieve party goals in the current Congress and prepare to take the majority in 2022.

For those who want to relitigate the past, there are plenty of pundits eager to take up the slack.

Published in Politics
Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

There are 187 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman
    @goldwaterwoman

    Uh, Jon, a wife is more important than a car. 😊

    • #1
  2. Basil Fawlty Member
    Basil Fawlty
    @BasilFawlty

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: On substance, I agree with Cheney. The election was not stolen and Trump’s Jan. 6 incitement merited impeachment.

    Sigh.

    • #2
  3. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    Goldwaterwoman (View Comment):

    Uh, Jon, a wife is more important than a car. 😊

    Depends on the wife and the car.

    • #3
  4. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge
    Gazpacho Grande'
    @ChrisCampion

    Lots of “Impeach.  Bar.  Remove from office.” posts this year.

    I could go down the list of just about everyone in Congress and find good reason to vote them out.  Not quite sure raising The Trump Spectre again, and again, about how his actions warranted impeachment (when other elected politicians actively cheered and supported rioters all last year, with billions in damage, people murdered, and not a peep about impeaching them or removing them from office), is telling us much at all here.

    Also:  Sigh.

    • #4
  5. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    I heard you saying the same thing on the podcast this morning.  I just read an article at Commentary saying pretty much the opposite.  
    https://www.commentarymagazine.com/noah-rothman/the-republican-self-harm-complex/

    I have only recently been able to read Commentary again without too much annoyance and then, as the Gipper said, “there you go again”.

    • #5
  6. Tyrion Lannister Member
    Tyrion Lannister
    @TyrionLannister

    Liz Cheney should have lost the #3 spot months ago, so this move is overdue.  As far getting voted out- that’s up to her constituents.  If they keep her around I don’t care, since she’s a solid R vote, but I’d be okay if she was replaced with someone further to the right. All the voters who went along with the impeachment vote should face a challenge except Collins because no other R could win Maine.  

    I see Jon still thinks impeach and remove was correct, and that shouldn’t be surprising I guess.  He’s never going to publicly waffle on that position so it’s a  pointless fight.  I sometimes wonder if he sees the strong support for Trump in the party and secretly thinks his position was wrong.  Ben Shapiro is another one who thinks Trump caused a lot of the problems with his rhetoric but largely avoids antagonizing the base (and his customers), and spends his time attacking the left.  Apparently Liz didn’t read the playbook and is immolating her political career. 

    • #6
  7. Cow Girl Thatcher
    Cow Girl
    @CowGirl

    Seriously Jon? Trump did not tell those idiots to go the Capitol Building and break in and mess up stuff. He. Did. Not.

    But you’re right about Liz Cheney….she needs to go–now. Not 18 months from now. Has the woman even ever lived in Wyoming? Okay, I looked up the answer. In 2013 she and her husband bought a fancy mansion in Jackson Hole. The perfect place for a Fake Wyomingite to live. She was born in Wisconsin. She graduated from high school in Virginia. She attended college in Colorado. 

    I grew up in Wyoming, as a third generation farm girl. One of my great-grandfathers moved to our teeny mountain valley when he was 18, in 1877, to be a beaver trapper. Only the Shoshone people lived there at the time. Then a group of Mormons moved there to hide out with their polygamous wives…(the other side of my family tree). So my family has been living there for 144 years, and most of them still live there.

    I left Wyoming at age 18 for college, marriage and life with a Navy man who is also a third generation Wyoming native. So I haven’t lived there for decades, and I don’t plan to return because I appreciate life without snow. But I am STILL more qualified to call myself a citizen of Wyoming than Liz Cheney.   

    Okay…I’ll stop now.  

    • #7
  8. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman
    @goldwaterwoman

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: On substance, I agree with Cheney. The election was not stolen and Trump’s Jan. 6 incitement merited impeachment.

    Although I agree the election was not stolen, I do believe some chicanery occurred, particularly in Pennsylvania. I watched Trump’s entire speech on January 6 and did not feel he was inciting anything other than a peaceful march down to the capitol to protest and most  certainly did not deserve to be impeached over it. That said, I wish he  would not have made the speech as nothing good came of it. Cheney’s supercilious attitude toward the Trump faction is typical of that wing of the Republican party that rejected the tea party movement of several years ago. They must either recognize it for what it is or get swept aside.   

    • #8
  9. Doug Watt Moderator
    Doug Watt
    @DougWatt

    I wish Liz Cheney would spend more time on critical race theory in our schools, and I wouldn’t mind if she threw a bone, or two to law enforcement. There must be something in the water in DC. Elected officials forget that they are there to further the interests of those who sent them there.

    My son and daughter-in-law are paying close attention to the critical race issue in their school district. Since our daughter-in-law is a Japanese citizen, and the two grandsons have both a US and Japanese passports they are considering moving to Japan for the boy’s education. It’s not a move they want to make, but the moment they believe the boys will get a better education in Japan than in the US they will make the move.

    • #9
  10. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Being “not a Democrat” and “not Trump” is not an agenda. I have no idea why I should want Liz Cheney in the House. I wonder if she does.

    • #10
  11. TaterHerk Member
    TaterHerk
    @TaterHerk

    The better analogy would be if your wife kept blaming you for the accident. 

    • #11
  12. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker
    @JennaStocker

    Strictly speaking about Liz Cheney, yes I agree. She’s made known she supported the policies of the Trump Administration, (one example here: https://www.c-span.org/video/?510702-1/representative-liz-cheney-discusses-future-republican-party )

    but it’s clear she has no interest in promoting these ideas – solid ones that were popular during his presidency and would be effective in combating the horrible mess and impending consequences of Biden’s policies. Instead she seems he’ll bent on distinguishing herself as some type of martyr to the past. Leaders don’t put their vanity causes ahead of working to  defeat the Democrats. Time for her to go.

    • #12
  13. Giulietta Coolidge
    Giulietta
    @giuliettachicago

    Liz Cheney is like a dog with a bone on Trump- she can’t let go of him. I think there were definite irregularities in the election- states like Pennsylvania broke and bent their own laws about how elections were to be carried out and that is worthy of investigation. Trump’s speech in D.C. was not an incitement to violence, it was not an invitation to storm a government building. The riots that took place this past summer cannot even be mentioned in the same breath as January 5th. There is no comparison.

    There is no question in my mind that Trump revitalized the Republican Party, but I don’t know that it’s a good idea for him to run again. Someone like DeSantis who has a different relationship with the party and the media might be a better choice. The policies he’s been implementing in Florida reflect the interests of the people who live there. Contrast his work to Liz Cheney who cannot say that her campaign against Trump furthers the interests of her constituents. She just drives a wedge through the party and for that alone, she should go.

    • #13
  14. tigerlily Member
    tigerlily
    @tigerlily

    Doug Watt (View Comment):

    I wish Liz Cheney would spend more time on critical race theory in our schools, and I wouldn’t mind if she threw a bone, or two to law enforcement. There must be something in the water in DC. Elected officials forget that they are there to further the interests of those who sent them there.

    My son and daughter-in-law are paying close attention to the critical race issue in their school district. Since our daughter-in-law is a Japanese citizen, and the two grandsons have both a US and Japanese passports they are considering moving to Japan for the boy’s education. It’s not a move they want to make, but the moment they believe the boys will get a better education in Japan than in the US they will make the move.

    Agree. This needs to be the Republicans top priority. This neo-racism (both in school and in the workplace) is toxic and will tear the country apart if it’s not confronted and soundly defeated.

    • #14
  15. Tyrion Lannister Member
    Tyrion Lannister
    @TyrionLannister

    In response to Giulietta’s musings on 2024:  so far I’m mostly very impressed with DeSantis and ideally I’d like Trump to play kingmaker and bless his running.  I think it would mostly clear the field and unify the party- popular governor with leadership experience getting the nod from a successful President.  I wish he’d say something like, “I’m not going to embarrass myself like Senile Joe and run with dementia – Republicans deserve better than what the Democrats settled for.  DeSantis has my full faith and support”.  

    Unfortunately I think Trump will run again.  I hope I’m wrong.  I’d still wholeheartedly support him if he won the primary, but I don’t think he’d win as easily or govern as effectively as some other candidates.  And I want someone younger.  

    My top 3 right now are Cruz, DeSantis, Pompeo.  I think it would be hilarious though if Trump pulled a Grover Cleveland and won another term.  The meltdown on the left would be great fun to watch.  

    • #15
  16. Instugator Thatcher
    Instugator
    @Instugator

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: The election was not stolen

    Yes it was. Via election rules passed without regard to State laws or State’s constitutions in violation of the US Constitution which vests the power for federal elections exclusively in State Legislatures.

    Here, in case you have trouble looking it up, Article 2 Section 1. Emphasis Added.

    Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

    Par particular attention to the words “Legislature Thereof”. That doesn’t mean “via consent decree with the Governor” (as in Georgia). Nor does it mean “Federal Court” – as was attempted in Wisconsin. Look for yourself for the other cases.

    There are no COVID exemptions in the US Constitution.

     

     

    • #16
  17. Goldwaterwoman Thatcher
    Goldwaterwoman
    @goldwaterwoman

    Doug Watt (View Comment):
    I wish Liz Cheney would spend more time on critical race theory in our schools, and I wouldn’t mind if she threw a bone, or two to law enforcement. There must be something in the water in DC. Elected officials forget that they are there to further the interests of those who sent them there.

    I have a neighbor, whom I adore, who always votes Democrat. When I asked her what she thought of the CRT, she had no idea what I was talking about. The real problem in this country is the ignorance of the electorate. Democracy can only work with an educated voter, and we have far too many people in this country who pay no attention to policy until it’s too late. This country was founded some 250 years ago as an experiment; only now are we beginning to realize how fragile that experiment really is.

    • #17
  18. Baker Member
    Baker
    @Baker

    As long as Republicans in pursuit of a Mar-a-Lago invite can’t admit the election was not stolen or that what happened on January 6th was completely disgusting and done by those on the right, I am very grateful some conservative in power is willing to speak the truth. Cheney making liars and cowards uncomfortable is very much in her favor.

    • #18
  19. ToryWarWriter Thatcher
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    Liz Cheney reminds of so many elected office holders I have met in Canada, who forget that its not them that matters, but the electoral machinery that does.  

    We had a Leadership race in Ontario a few years ago and I backed the outsider.  He had very little elected support, what he did do was go and meet with every Riding President in the province (including me).  While caucus kept endorsing his rival, he wracked up all the Riding Presidents and thus all the delegate slots and votes.

    Guess who won the election.

    My understanding is that Liz Cheney hasnt answered her state parties phone call in months.

    • #19
  20. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    With all due respect Jon, I disagree.  Trump’s Big Lie and his part in the Capitol Riot disqualify him from any future role in the Republican Party.  Liz Cheney penned an Op-Ed in the Washington Post today which was just released.  As it is a public statement from a public figure, it is not protected by copyright; indeed, it was written to be widely disseminated.  My comments will be in italics.

    Opinion: Liz Cheney: The GOP is at a turning point. History is watching us.

    Opinion by Liz CheneyMay 5, 2021 at 2:05 p.m. MST

    In public statements again this week, former president Donald Trump has repeated his claims that the 2020 election was a fraud and was stolen. His message: I am still the rightful president, and President Biden is illegitimate. Trump repeats these words now with full knowledge that exactly this type of language provoked violence on Jan. 6. And, as the Justice Department and multiple federal judges have suggested, there is good reason to believe that Trump’s language can provoke violence again. Trump is seeking to unravel critical elements of our constitutional structure that make democracy work — confidence in the result of elections and the rule of law. No other American president has ever done this.

    I completely agree with Liz Cheney on this.  Trump is repeatedly lying and promoting the Trump Big Lie that he won the election.  Such an insane statement must be counted and disavowed.  Silence is complicity.  

    The Republican Party is at a turning point, and Republicans must decide whether we are going to choose truth and fidelity to the Constitution. In the immediate wake of the violence of Jan. 6, almost all of us knew the gravity and the cause of what had just happened — we had witnessed it firsthand.

    This is a time for adherance to first principles.  Are we a constitutional republic with checks and balances?  

    House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy (Calif.) left no doubt in his public remarks. On the floor of the House on Jan. 13, McCarthy said: “The president bears responsibility for Wednesday’s attack on Congress by mob rioters. He should have immediately denounced the mob when he saw what was unfolding.” Now, McCarthy has changed his story.

    I was proud of McCarthy when he denounced Trump’s appalling behavior.  This was right and proper.  It is astonishing that McCarthy showed up in Palm Beach for a photo op with Trump shortly thereafter.

    I am a conservative Republican, [Liz Cheney voted with Trump some 97% of the time, one of the highest percentages in Congress] and the most conservative of conservative values is reverence for the rule of law. Each of us swears an oath before God to uphold our Constitution. The electoral college has spoken. More than 60 state and federal courts, including multiple Trump-appointed judges, have rejected the former president’s arguments, and refused to overturn election results. That is the rule of law; that is our constitutional system for resolving claims of election fraud.

    This point needs to be driven home, over and over again, as long as Trump promotes the Trump Big Lie, that he won the election.  When Trump stops promoting the Trump Big Lie, there will not be the responsibility to counter him.  But now there is a moral mandate to confront and denounce the Trump Big Lie. 

    The question before us now is whether we will join Trump’s crusade to delegitimize and undo the legal outcome of the 2020 election, with all the consequences that might have. I have worked overseas in nations where changes in leadership come only with violence, where democracy takes hold only until the next violent upheaval. America is exceptional because our constitutional system guards against that. At the heart of our republic is a commitment to the peaceful transfer of power among political rivals in accordance with law. President Ronald Reagan described this as our American “miracle.”

    Anyone who cites the Greatest President of the Twentieth Century is all right in my book.

    While embracing or ignoring Trump’s statements might seem attractive to some for fundraising and political purposes, that approach will do profound long-term damage to our party and our country. Trump has never expressed remorse or regret for the attack of Jan. 6 and now suggests that our elections, and our legal and constitutional system, cannot be trusted to do the will of the people. This is immensely harmful, especially as we now compete on the world stage against Communist China and its claims that democracy is a failed system.

    Trump is attacking the very core of democracy.  He is seeking to place his own personal interest above the needs of the country.

    For Republicans, the path forward is clear.

    First, support the ongoing Justice Department criminal investigations of the Jan. 6 attack. Those investigations must be comprehensive and objective; neither the White House nor any member of Congress should interfere.

    I am praying for prosecution and that those who invaded the Capitol be brought to justice.  When was the last time that a mob broke into the Capitol?  I think that it was during the War of 1812, some two hundred and eight or nine years ago.

    Second, we must support a parallel bipartisan review by a commission with subpoena power to seek and find facts; it will describe for all Americans what happened. This is critical to defeat the misinformation and nonsense circulating in the press and on social media. No currently serving member of Congress — with an eye to the upcoming election cycle — should participate. We should appoint former officials, members of the judiciary and other prominent Americans who can be objective, just as we did after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The commission should be focused on the Jan. 6 attacks. The Black Lives Matter and antifa violence of last summer was illegal and reprehensible, but it is a different problem with a different solution.

    The Antifa and BLM riots were terrible.  But they did not involve a President of the United States inciting a riot to seek to stop the election of his successor.  We must get to the bottom of this.

    Finally, we Republicans need to stand for genuinely conservative principles, and steer away from the dangerous and anti-democratic Trump cult of personality. In our hearts, we are devoted to the American miracle. We believe in the rule of law, in limited government, in a strong national defense, and in prosperity and opportunity brought by low taxes and fiscally conservative policies.

    She said it, I didn’t.  For better or worse the phrase of “cult of personality” has been banned by the moderators.  I am simply repeating what Liz Cheney said.  

    There is much at stake now, including the ridiculous wokeness of our political rivals, the irrational policies at the border and runaway spending that threatens a return to the catastrophic inflation of the 1970s. Reagan formed a broad coalition from across the political spectrum to return America to sanity, and we need to do the same now. We know how. But this will not happen if Republicans choose to abandon the rule of law and join Trump’s crusade to undermine the foundation of our democracy and reverse the legal outcome of the last election.

    There is so much that needs to be done to fight the Democrats.  But we cannot do so if we are led by a President who is promoting the Trump Big Lie that he won the election and then incited a riot on 1/6.  We must clean our own home before we can take on the Democrats. 

    History is watching. Our children are watching. We must be brave enough to defend the basic principles that underpin and protect our freedom and our democratic process. I am committed to doing that, no matter what the short-term political consequences might be.

    I recently finished the third volume of the authorized biography of Margaret Thatcher.  A few phrases come to mind.  “TINA” which stood for “There is no alternative.”  “The Lady’s not for turning.”  and her nickname as “The Iron Lady.”   I think that the Republican Party has found our own “Iron Lady.”

    • #20
  21. DrewInEastHillAutonomousZone Member
    DrewInEastHillAutonomousZone
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Stick a fork in this thread. It’s done.

    • #21
  22. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    Tyrion Lannister (View Comment):
    Unfortunately I think Trump will run again.  I hope I’m wrong.  I’d still wholeheartedly support him if he won the primary, but I don’t think he’d win as easily or govern as effectively as some other candidates.  And I want someone younger.  

    If the Democrats are able to push through some new states before 2024, Obama can still be the only President to serve under the same flag he was (allegedly) born under. Otherwise, you’re correct and we need someone to join the list that Obama started.

    • #22
  23. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    Instugator (View Comment):

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: The election was not stolen

    Yes it was. Via election rules passed without regard to State laws or State’s constitutions in violation of the US Constitution which vests the power for federal elections exclusively in State Legislatures.

    Here, in case you have trouble looking it up, Article 2 Section 1. Emphasis Added.

    Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

    Par particular attention to the words “Legislature Thereof”. That doesn’t mean “via consent decree with the Governor” (as in Georgia). Nor does it mean “Federal Court” – as was attempted in Wisconsin. Look for yourself for the other cases.

    There are no COVID exemptions in the US Constitution.

    Gosh, when was the last time that a Legislature disregarded the vote of the people and installed their own electors for the Electoral College?  The Legislature can do that if they change the rules before the election; they cannot do that once the election has been held.

    • #23
  24. Instugator Thatcher
    Instugator
    @Instugator

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):
    Gosh, when was the last time that a Legislature disregarded the vote of the people and installed their own electors for the Electoral College?  The Legislature can do that if they change the rules before the election; they cannot do that once the election has been held.

    Explain to me how the Georgia governor’s agreement to a consent decree with a plaintiff is the will of the legislature. 

    If you can’t, then go re-read what I wrote and hang your head in shame.

    This is the problem with too many Gary’s.

     

    • #24
  25. philo Member
    philo
    @philo

    “Baker dude”…still makes me giggle. At least he is good for something.

    • #25
  26. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    Instugator (View Comment):

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):
    Gosh, when was the last time that a Legislature disregarded the vote of the people and installed their own electors for the Electoral College? The Legislature can do that if they change the rules before the election; they cannot do that once the election has been held.

    Explain to me how the Georgia governor’s agreement to a consent decree with a plaintiff is the will of the legislature.

    If you can’t, then go re-read what I wrote and hang your head in shame.

    This is the problem with too many Gary’s.

    Babylon Bee is reporting on it.

    • #26
  27. philo Member
    philo
    @philo

    Consider everything she has done since mid-January as pre-negotiations for her pay at the next job and it all makes sense. (Her PR team is earning their money on this one. NOTE: They are dictating everything you are reading about her today.))

    • #27
  28. philo Member
    philo
    @philo

    Instugator (View Comment):

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):
    Gosh, when was the last time that a Legislature disregarded the vote of the people and installed their own electors for the Electoral College? The Legislature can do that if they change the rules before the election; they cannot do that once the election has been held.

    Explain to me how the Georgia governor’s agreement to a consent decree with a plaintiff is the will of the legislature.

    If you can’t, then go re-read what I wrote and hang your head in shame.

    This is the problem with too many Gary’s.

    Agreed:

     

    • #28
  29. ToryWarWriter Thatcher
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Instugator (View Comment):

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: The election was not stolen

    Yes it was. Via election rules passed without regard to State laws or State’s constitutions in violation of the US Constitution which vests the power for federal elections exclusively in State Legislatures.

    Here, in case you have trouble looking it up, Article 2 Section 1. Emphasis Added.

    Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

    Par particular attention to the words “Legislature Thereof”. That doesn’t mean “via consent decree with the Governor” (as in Georgia). Nor does it mean “Federal Court” – as was attempted in Wisconsin. Look for yourself for the other cases.

    There are no COVID exemptions in the US Constitution.

    Gosh, when was the last time that a Legislature disregarded the vote of the people and installed their own electors for the Electoral College? The Legislature can do that if they change the rules before the election; they cannot do that once the election has been held.

    1960.  

    • #29
  30. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Instugator (View Comment):

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: The election was not stolen

    Yes it was. Via election rules passed without regard to State laws or State’s constitutions in violation of the US Constitution which vests the power for federal elections exclusively in State Legislatures.

    Here, in case you have trouble looking it up, Article 2 Section 1. Emphasis Added.

    Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

    Par particular attention to the words “Legislature Thereof”. That doesn’t mean “via consent decree with the Governor” (as in Georgia). Nor does it mean “Federal Court” – as was attempted in Wisconsin. Look for yourself for the other cases.

    There are no COVID exemptions in the US Constitution.

    Gosh, when was the last time that a Legislature disregarded the vote of the people and installed their own electors for the Electoral College? The Legislature can do that if they change the rules before the election; they cannot do that once the election has been held.

    1960.

    And the name of the state where this happened?

    • #30