Traveling to Hawaii? Here’s What Their Government Has In Store for You.

 

Hawaii’s COVID Protocols Are Severe, Cases Are Still Going Up, And Your Vaccine Doesn’t Matter. Will We Ever “Return To Normal?”

Most Americans in the lower 48 states are fed a steady diet of COVID news and scaremongering, with the never-ending debates over “lockdown” (read: Democratic) states, like Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, California, and Pennsylvania; versus “free states” (read: Republican) like Texas, Florida, and, to varying degrees, most everyone else.

Being overlooked is the State of Hawaii. It “reopened” to tourists on or about April 5th. They’re not making it easy to visit. And it’s complicated by a surge in new cases, not unlike other lockdown states. And it might make other lockdown states jealous.

I am penning this from the County of Kaua’i, Hawaii’s northernmost island, and geologically its oldest. It is our fifth trip to America’s 50th state. If you’re planning an upcoming visit, you should seriously consider what’s involved. It’s not like visiting any of the 49 states, vaccine or not.

It’s not as bad as Canada, since the Canadians have practically closed their borders except for essential travel. And those who get through have to quarantine for three days, at your expense, in an approved facility while you await your government COVID test results, in 3 days (not hours). Same with Australia, I’m told, with up to 14 days in quarantine.

Even, reportedly, if you had a vaccine. And if you don’t have a smartphone or are not technologically proficient with it, you are asking for trouble with your Hawaii visit. That’s because the first thing you must do, well in advance of travel, is to visit Hawaii’s official travel website. You must create an account and begin filling out and uploading documents, especially your approved COVID test results. They even invite you to upload a photo of yourself.

Nowhere do they ask for vaccine information. It doesn’t matter. Seriously.

Getting here this time was a challenge, thanks to Hawaii’s state and local government COVID restrictions. No problem, I thought – without carefully reading the notices and advisories. I had my Johnson & Johnson vaccine shot in early April. Surely that would suffice. Nope.

You have to obtain a COVID test taken within 72-hours of travel, vaccine or not. Not just any COVID test, but a specific PCR (whatever that means) test from one of their approved partners. And you need to upload the results via a .pdf file to your Travel Hawaii profile.

I thought surely, my Arlington County, Virginia’s COVID antigen testing regime would suffice. We have a walk-up testing clinic less than two miles from our home, conducted through a company named Curative. I uploaded the test results to my Travel Hawaii website profile. Not only was the test “not approved,” but Curative is not a trusted partner. Forget that, despite a negative test result.

We asked our Hawaii resort for advice. Go to CVS, they advised. So we did, scrambling to get an appointment at one of their very efficient “minute clinics” the day before our departure. After waiting 30 minutes for the results – negative, again – I asked for a written copy of my test results as a backup if I had problems with Hawaii’s website (and it is inaccessible occasionally).

I casually mentioned to the nurse that I needed the test result for Hawaii travel. She looked at me, startled. She had just received the requirements for Hawaii, which would reject my test results. I had to get a different test. Where do I get that, I asked her. A blank stare was my response. Thanks, CVS, but no thanks. At least I wasn’t out any money for either of my Arlington tests – just a couple of lost hours and growing frustration. CVS is a “partner” with Hawaii, but, again, my results were “not approved” when uploaded to my Travel Hawaii website profile.

Instead of packing for my trip, I begin spending a few frustrating hours doing some online research for options. I was drawing blanks where I live in northern Virginia (too late, it seems). Surely LAX, where we had a brief layover, might have a testing center for Hawaii. Yes! Clarity had several testing sites at LAX, and they were an “official partner” with the State of Hawaii, with results in 3-5 hours before we would land in Lihue. If all went according to plan (on-time flights, etc.), we would land, hike our way to the site two terminals away, then hike back through security for connecting flight – $250 later (two tests). Not covered by insurance.

Clarity has a sweet deal with LAX and the government of Hawaii, it would seem. If I were still an investigative reporter, I might “follow the money.”

Online reservations were easy; lots of time slots available, and everything went according to plan – no wait. I even received my test results via email just as we were departing for Hawaii. I was able to convert my test results into an Acrobat .pdf file (thanks to Apple iPhone’s iOS Safari browser) and upload it onto my Hawaii official travel profile before takeoff and losing any onboard internet coverage (American flights to Hawaii do not have internet coverage over the Pacific Ocean).

But that’s not all. Within 24 hours of travel, you need to log on to your Travel Hawaii profile site and answer a “health questionnaire.” Once you do that successfully, you are emailed a QR code that government officials will scan upon arrival to access your profile with your uploaded documents and determine whether you have to quarantine or are exempt.

Again, no questions about vaccines. And the airports (DCA and LAX) and planes were completely packed. What pandemic?

We would arrive, deplane, and be led on a weird, meandering walk under the watchful eyes of airport staff and wait in line to be cleared by an official. The airport staff was friendly and helpful, and it seems everyone on our plane had done their homework before departure and arrival. Things went pretty smoothly. You must show ID (Stacey Abrams, call your office). QR codes were scanned and cleared; we handed a boardwalk-style paper ticket to get our luggage and proceed on our way, exempt from quarantine.

Oh, but that is not all. Your “journey” is just beginning. Starting with a 2.5-hour wait in line for your rental car (thanks, Avis/Budget/Payless, along with your less-than-informative and unfriendly staff). At least that was my experience after some 14 hours of travel. When you finally show up at the counter, you have to use your smartphone to visit your Travel Hawaii profile so the car rental staff can confirm that you are exempt from quarantine. I then discovered why the rental car line was so long; poor cellular coverage at the airport (there is no web access outside the main terminal or at the car rental shops).

And then you get to do it again when you check into your hotel. Ours gave us yellow wristbands to wear to prove we’d been cleared. But the masks stay on, indoors and out, even in fitness centers while working out—no more than one person per elevator (outside of family groups). Restaurant and retail shop hours are limited. And when they ask to see your profile on the Travel Hawaii website, showing that you’re exempt from quarantine, they ask for ID.

We’re just getting started on this lovely trip, and I’m sure the frustrations will melt away here in paradise over the few days. I am blessed to be here, and the government-imposed hurdles qualify as first-world problems. Meanwhile, while here, I’ll need to keep my smartphone at hand with ready access to my profile page on the travel Hawaii website page every time we want to engage in many activities.

With so many advances in medical and other technology, I’m sure Bill Gates and others will be introducing us to “wearable” or other things that governments can quickly scan to make sure our future social credit scores or detailed testing and health status are up to date, accessible, and all too convenient. This is one area where China is clearly “ahead” of us.

Why did I get my vaccine again? Return to normal?

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  1. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Yes, my best friend who watched our cat while we were in Nashville last week is on her way to Maui now.  I did not ask her about their preparations, but I expect to get an earful when she gets back.  What a nightmare!

    And the TSA just extended the public transportation mask mandate through the end of September.  Return to normal?  Never.  I can see years of driving vacations in my crystal ball.  Until the state bans gasoline cars.

    • #1
  2. Charlotte Member
    Charlotte
    @Charlotte

    Jeeze.

    • #2
  3. E. Kent Golding Member
    E. Kent Golding
    @EKentGolding

    I recently went to Hawaii.  Key Points:    The Hawaii Government has a website that lists what kinds of tests they will permit , and approved providers for the tests.   If you are near an American Family Care. https://www.afcurgentcare.com/grand-rapids/ ,  I would use them — but call and schedule the appointment a week out, don’t just show up.  AFC has clinics all over America,  and by “near” I mean within 200 miles.   Not everyone on Hawaii’s list of providers even claim that they can hit Hawaii’s timing requirements– CVSs website states clearly that they CAN’T hit Hawaii’s timing,  and Walgreen’s website just states evasively that they make no timing guarantees .    Hawaii will require you to make a PDF of your test result and upload to their website — much of the hospitality industry will insist that you log into the Hawaii website and show that you are certified by the State of Hawaii to have successfully passed the test.    Research the islands carefully — some of the islands are more restrictive about admission than the state as a whole.  I think Oahu is the least restrictive and most open for business.     I would go to one island and stay there — If you island hop, you have to get new Covid tests before switching islands.

    Hawaii is wonderful.   However,  overall,  I would just go to Florida until Covid is pretty much in the rear view mirror.

    • #3
  4. Blondie Thatcher
    Blondie
    @Blondie

    “If I were still an investigative reporter, I might ‘follow the money.'” 

    You don’t need to be an investigative reporter to recognize people are being fleeced. What crazy hoops to go through. I decided a long time ago, thanks GWBush and TSA, that I wasn’t going anywhere that required flying. All these stories just renew that decision. There’s plenty I have left to see that I can reach by car. I haven’t lost a thing in Hawaii. I’ll spend my money where they seem to want it more. 

    I’d love for someone to sit down and have an honest (stop laughing) conversation with these lockdown governors to find out what exactly they want to accomplish. As far as I can tell, it isn’t to “slow the spread” cause they seem to be doing worse than the wide open places. It really is mind boggling. 

    • #4
  5. Richard O'Shea Coolidge
    Richard O'Shea
    @RichardOShea

    We are going to Kauai in July. It sounds like Mrs. O’Shea is going to have to break down and get a smart phone.

    • #5
  6. 9thDistrictNeighbor Member
    9thDistrictNeighbor
    @9thDistrictNeighbor

    I have been following the procedures for travel to Bermuda.  Now Bermuda has one hospital and a population of about 62k.  They are going with even more draconian procedures on the Canadian model.  In fact, you can’t have much fun there now because they are “locked down” (again) until May 9.  Whether or not you are immunized, everyone aged 10 and up must test at your own expense, (conveniently charged to you in advance) before departure, on arrival, on days 4, 8 and 14.  Upon arrival, government will issue a color coded wristband to be worn at all times.  Don’t want to wear a wristband?  You must quarantine at your hotel for 14 days.  Oh, and take your temperature twice a day and upload the information to a website.  That’s not all, but you get the idea. (Example, starting June 6 travelers without the jab will be “subject to supervised quarantine for up to 14 days in a designated facility at their own expense.”)

    Vacation FUN!!!

    Here is my issue.  Go to Facebook or any social media and the discussion revolves around the idea that has fermented over the past year-plus:  if you don’t like these rules you are trying to kill me!  With this mindset, any old-fashioned sense of normal is in the dumpster.

    • #6
  7. JustmeinAZ Member
    JustmeinAZ
    @JustmeinAZ

    That does not sound like a vacation to me. Sounds like a nightmare. I’ll just go to Florida.

    • #7
  8. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    I can think of many worse vacations than being forced to quarantine for 14 days in an oceanfront (NOT ocean “view”) hotel room in Hawaii…

    • #8
  9. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    JustmeinAZ (View Comment):

    That does not sound like a vacation to me. Sounds like a nightmare. I’ll just go to Florida.

    I used to say that I’ve never committed a serious enough crime to be sent to Florida. But times have changed. 

    • #9
  10. JustmeinAZ Member
    JustmeinAZ
    @JustmeinAZ

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    JustmeinAZ (View Comment):

    That does not sound like a vacation to me. Sounds like a nightmare. I’ll just go to Florida.

    I used to say that I’ve never committed a serious enough crime to be sent to Florida. But times have changed.

    Well we really do not mind the humidity. When my parents were alive we visited them twice a year so it’s almost like home. We like central Florida, north of Orlando.

    • #10
  11. Kelly D Johnston Coolidge
    Kelly D Johnston
    @SoupGuy

    Richard O'Shea (View Comment):

    We are going to Kauai in July. It sounds like Mrs. O’Shea is going to have to break down and get a smart phone.

    Start planning now. 

    • #11
  12. Scott Wilmot Member
    Scott Wilmot
    @ScottWilmot

    Wow. No thanks.

    • #12
  13. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    I can think of many worse vacations than being forced to quarantine for 14 days in an oceanfront (NOT ocean “view”) hotel room in Hawaii…

    But per that quarantine you probably can’t leave the room , so I don’t see that there’s much difference between oceanfront and ocean view. You will still get nothing more than the same view through the room window or sliding glass door. No stepping out onto the beach. No dipping your toe into the ocean. You’d need to clarify whether sitting out on the patio outside the room is permitted. No trip down the hall to the ice machine. No strolling the hotel grounds. No dining in the hotel restaurant (or anywhere else – all food left outside your room door). No maid cleaning the room or changing bed linens during your stay. If you ask the hotel might leave clean towels outside your room door. 

    • #13
  14. Miffed White Male Member
    Miffed White Male
    @MiffedWhiteMale

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Miffed White Male (View Comment):

    I can think of many worse vacations than being forced to quarantine for 14 days in an oceanfront (NOT ocean “view”) hotel room in Hawaii…

    But per that quarantine you probably can’t leave the room , so I don’t see that there’s much difference between oceanfront and ocean view. You will still get nothing more than the same view through the room window or sliding glass door. No stepping out onto the beach. No dipping your toe into the ocean. You’d need to clarify whether sitting out on the patio outside the room is permitted. No trip down the hall to the ice machine. No strolling the hotel grounds. No dining in the hotel restaurant (or anywhere else – all food left outside your room door). No maid cleaning the room or changing bed linens during your stay. If you ask the hotel might leave clean towels outside your room door.

    My experience with Hawaii resorts is that Ocean Front means you’re directly on the ocean (or at least as direct as the particular hotel can be).  Ocean “view” means “If you look over the air conditioning unit on the roof of the building across from you and squint, you can kind of see the water”.

    • #14
  15. Doctor Robert Member
    Doctor Robert
    @DoctorRobert

    Don’t make it work.  Take away tourism and Hawaii becomes just another Pacific slum.  Let the fools go broke, let them take responsibility for electing Democrats.  

    • #15
  16. MWD B612 "Dawg" Member
    MWD B612 "Dawg"
    @danok1

    Blondie (View Comment):

    “If I were still an investigative reporter, I might ‘follow the money.’”

    You don’t need to be an investigative reporter to recognize people are being fleeced. What crazy hoops to go through. I decided a long time ago, thanks GWBush and TSA, that I wasn’t going anywhere that required flying. All these stories just renew that decision. There’s plenty I have left to see that I can reach by car. I haven’t lost a thing in Hawaii. I’ll spend my money where they seem to want it more.

    I’d love for someone to sit down and have an honest (stop laughing) conversation with these lockdown governors to find out what exactly they want to accomplish. As far as I can tell, it isn’t to “slow the spread” cause they seem to be doing worse than the wide open places. It really is mind boggling.

    My brother was planning to have us all go to Cape Breton Island, NS, to celebrate his 60th birthday. Well, the border is closed, so we’ll all meet in Nashville. Too bad, Trudeau fils (or Castro fils, depending on whom you believe), you don’t get our tourist dollars. 

    • #16
  17. MISTER BITCOIN Inactive
    MISTER BITCOIN
    @MISTERBITCOIN

    https://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=242205

    81% of population have natural T cell defense against covid

     

    • #17
  18. MISTER BITCOIN Inactive
    MISTER BITCOIN
    @MISTERBITCOIN

    so much for logging off or unplugging during vacation

     

    • #18
  19. Basil Fawlty Member
    Basil Fawlty
    @BasilFawlty

    Be sure to visit Molokai.

    • #19