Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Basketball HOF, Class of ’11

 

Dennis Rodman, Chris Mullin, and Tara VanDerveer are three well deserving members of the new class, announced today.

Wait.

What’s that I hear? You don’t think Rodman deserves it? Tell me why.

Others who will be inducted into the basketball Hall of Fame (Springfield, Mass.) in August are Tex Winter, Herb Magee, Artis Gilmore, Arvydas Sabonis, Teresa Edwards, Reece “Goose” Tatum, and Tom “Satch” Sanders. 

Some excerpts from article linked to, above:

“It’s cool, man. It’s a great feeling,” Rodman said. 

… When asked who helped him get to the hall of fame, Rodman had a simple answer: “Me.”

… For VanDerveer, Monday’s announcement was bittersweet, coming just hours after her Stanford team lost 63-62 to Texas A&M in a national semifinal in Indianapolis.

“This is kind of a tough morning to be a basketball coach for me waking up after our loss last night,” she said on a conference call. “This opportunity to be enshrined in Naismith is an incredible honor, and I’m overwhelmed by it.”

In December, VanDerveer became the sixth woman to get 800 coaching victories.

“It’s the ultimate compliment to a coach or basketball player. I’m humbled and honored. You should be really excited about it, but I wish it hadn’t come on this day. I’m not feeling great about myself or how we played. You go back and think about all the things I could have done or should have done. The sun didn’t come up this morning here.”

There are 19 comments.

  1. Elizabeth Dunn Inactive

    I prefer to remember Rodman in his glorious “salad days” with the ’89 Pistons, playing under his mentor Chuck Daley (pre-Madonna, tattoos and excessive body piercings). The long, coltish legs and his openly emotional enthusiasm for playing D will endear him to me forever. Not to mention, this young dude (with help from Joe Dumars, of course) forever redefined the art of playing defense in the NBA. For this, he certainly deserves to be inducted.

    As for VanDerveer, she and Pat Summitt practically invented girl’s basketball. Another worthy choice. :)

    • #1
    • April 5, 2011, at 2:30 AM PDT
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  2. Palaeologus Inactive
    The Great Adventure!: Sabonis? Really? The guy was just one of a long line of injury prone centers for the Blazers (Walton, Bowie, Oden, to name a few). Bill Walton was the only one of that group that I would say did enough in his career to warrant HOF induction. Sabonis was an uncanny outlet passer, but beyond that there wasn’t much.

    I think Sabonis should be a shoe-in. Here’s why: it’s the basketball, not the NBA, HOF. Sabonis was easily Walton’s equal. At Portland he was very effective, as an arthritic geriatric.

    Imagine if you were judging Walton based on his career with the Celtics. That’s more or less what you’re doing with Arvydas.

    Rodman belongs in the Hall. If crazy folk can be honored as authors, musicians, actors, & artists then there’s no reason that athletes should be left out.

    • #2
    • April 5, 2011, at 3:20 AM PDT
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  3. Ursula Hennessey Contributor
    Ursula Hennessey
    John Marzan: Artis Gilmore, about time! · Apr 4 at 11:16pm

    Agreed! Brian C. Anderson has a good piece on him at NRO.

    • #3
    • April 5, 2011, at 4:33 AM PDT
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  4. Percival Thatcher
    Percival Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I could see why some think Dennis doesn’t belong, but I would respectfully disagree. In the ’96 Finals, he was on (and I mean on) Detlef Schrempf continuously. Schrempf came to the foul line still steaming at the latest indignity. Dennis took his position on the lane grinning at him with that particularly demented grin of his, and Schrempf missed both shots.

    Some of Rodman’s best games were played between other peoples’ ears.

    • #4
    • April 5, 2011, at 5:23 AM PDT
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  5. Ursula Hennessey Contributor
    Ursula Hennessey
    Percival:

    Some of Rodman’s best games were played between other peoples’ ears. · Apr 4 at 5:23pm

    So true, Percival! I would also argue that he outworked just about everyone on the court.

    • #5
    • April 5, 2011, at 5:30 AM PDT
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  6. Ursula Hennessey Contributor
    Ursula Hennessey
    Percival:

    By the way, welcome to Ricochet, Percival! Come often and stay long.

    • #6
    • April 5, 2011, at 5:35 AM PDT
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  7. Elizabeth Dunn Inactive

    I sense there may be a small, yet vociferous group of Rodman fans at Ricochet- just as it should be.

    • #7
    • April 5, 2011, at 5:59 AM PDT
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  8. Percival Thatcher
    Percival Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member
    Ursula Hennessey
    Percival:
    By the way, welcome to Ricochet, Percival! Come often and stay long. · Apr 4 at 5:35pm

    Thank you Ursula! I’ve been lurking here awhile before plunking down my dough. I’ve noticed the intelligent, respectful, and interesting conversations that are conducted here, and asked myself “what can I do to screw all this up?”

    Just kidding. I don’t bite.

    Anymore.

    Much.

    Lately.

    • #8
    • April 5, 2011, at 6:32 AM PDT
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  9. John Marzan Inactive

    re Rodman, the guy averaged 15+rebounds for many consecutive years. and was defensive player of the year twice IIRC. (Kevin Love is averaging 15+Reb on a very bad team. he may be a good spot up shooter, but that’s it. love gets his shot blocked a lot inside)

    Sabonis was in his 30’s when he finally made it to the NBA. It was his intl career that was very impressive.

    • #9
    • April 5, 2011, at 7:34 AM PDT
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  10. Bill Walsh Member
    Bill Walsh Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    If Rodman had ever learned to hit an open 12-foot jump-shot, he’d have been a monster. His defensive game and his positioning on rebounds at both ends of the court were a thing of beauty. And on that 72-win Bulls team, he was incredibly valuable (his then-obvious insanity kept in check by the more ferocious and focused madman, Michael Jordan). HOF? I think so. I think he’s like a brilliant-fielding, weak hitting shortstop or a great interior lineman. His game wasn’t completely brilliant, but he dominated the best players in the game in facets at which he excelled.

    • #10
    • April 5, 2011, at 9:50 AM PDT
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  11. John Marzan Inactive
    Bill Walsh: If Rodman had ever learned to hit an open 12-foot jump-shot, he’d have been a monster.

    he had a good shot selection and was a great finisher around the basket though.

    • #11
    • April 5, 2011, at 11:11 AM PDT
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  12. Elizabeth Dunn Inactive

    Bill Walsh,

    Thanks for the spot on analysis!

    • #12
    • April 5, 2011, at 11:11 AM PDT
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  13. John Marzan Inactive

    Artis Gilmore, about time!

    • #13
    • April 5, 2011, at 11:16 AM PDT
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  14. Bill Walsh Member
    Bill Walsh Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member
    John Marzan
    Bill Walsh: If Rodman had ever learned to hit an open 12-foot jump-shot, he’d have been a monster.

    he had a good shot selection and was a great finisher around the basket though. · Apr 4 at 11:11pm

    We don’t disagree. But he’d get a lot of open looks (because of his brilliant positional sense—and probably the other team’s slight regard for him as an offensive threat), and then, when he’d take the “you gotta shoot that” shot, he’d lay a lot of bricks. Occasionally when he’d get a hot hand and score 10 or 15, it’d change the whole complexion of the offense, because suddenly the D would have to account for him (and if he wanted to, he could get open—especially around the basket, as you say).

    • #14
    • April 5, 2011, at 11:28 AM PDT
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  15. Bill Walsh Member
    Bill Walsh Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member
    Elizabeth Dunn: Bill Walsh,

    Thanks for the spot on analysis! · Apr 4 at 11:11pm

    Thanks. I blush.

    • #15
    • April 5, 2011, at 11:30 AM PDT
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  16. The Great Adventure! Inactive
    The Great Adventure! Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Sabonis? Really? The guy was just one of a long line of injury prone centers for the Blazers (Walton, Bowie, Oden, to name a few). Bill Walton was the only one of that group that I would say did enough in his career to warrant HOF induction. Sabonis was an uncanny outlet passer, but beyond that there wasn’t much.

    BUT – If you’re going to induct him, I don’t see how you could not induct Rodman.

    • #16
    • April 5, 2011, at 12:31 PM PDT
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  17. Standfast Inactive

    Rodman in the Hall of Fame? Just another reason why I no longer follow or care about the NBA.

    Chick Hearn’s death ended an era of great play by play announcers. Kobegate proved that most NBA players are not good role models. Why should I support that kind of lifestyle with my money?

    • #17
    • April 5, 2011, at 12:37 PM PDT
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  18. Vance Richards Member
    Vance Richards Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Without Rodman pounding the boards, the Pistons never would have won those titles (the Bulls would have won with or without him). Of course, if the Pistons never won a championship then the Knicks never would have wasted their time with Isaiah Thomas . . .so in a way Rodman did more harm then good for us Knick fans.

    • #18
    • April 6, 2011, at 3:36 AM PDT
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  19. Elizabeth Dunn Inactive
    Vance Richards: Of course, if the Pistons never won a championship then the Knicks never would have wasted their time with Isaiah Thomas . . .so in a way Rodman did more harm then good for us Knick fans. · Apr 5 at 3:36pm

    Much to my chagrin, have to agree the Thomas- Dolan family “merger” was a toxic one, indeed. Too bad… Isaiah was an awfully exciting guard to watch in his day, but we musn’t blame the Worm!

    • #19
    • April 6, 2011, at 3:50 AM PDT
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