Gov. Rick Perry of Texas, Running for President

 

Officially, he’s only “thinking” about it.  But the resignation of two key Gingrich campaign execs, Dave Carney and Rob Johnson, seems to point to a Perry announcement soon.  Both Carney and Johnson are old Perry hands.  

From RealClearPolitics:

As a prominent Texan with a longtime political infrastructure, not to mention a key finance perch atop the Republican Governors Association, Perry could gear up for a race more quickly than most of the top Republican politicians eyeing a presidential run.

Though he is widely regarded as the first nationally known politician to embrace the tea party movement with open arms, Perry could also be well-positioned to generate sufficient backing among members of the Republican establishment.

Perry is said to have a solid relationship with his predecessor at the RGA, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who declined to run for president himself.

And in an election that is almost certain to hinge on the economy, Perry is well-positioned to tout his record on creating jobs and keeping taxes low.

Perry’s an interesting guy.  Stephen Hayes sums it up in 2 consecutive Tweets:

Perry advantages: TX economy, good looks, Tea Party cred, Rush Limbaugh likes him, and access to Big TX money.

And:

Perry disadvantages: TX gov is weak, TX/Bush fatigue, can be undisciplined, not driven by ideas/policy, relatively soft GOP support in TX.

And Ramesh Ponnuru points us to this part of a speech Perry gave two years ago:

One way to stop this serious spiral is to take simple, direct action: cutting the mandate for corn-derived ethanol by at least 50%. While the mandate may have been a well-intentioned effort to move our country toward energy independence, it is doing more harm than good, and should be modified before it makes things even worse.

Perry’s record as a successful, sitting governor with major Tea Party credibility seems to spell trouble for the other Tea Party candidate in the race, Michele Bachmann.  And I think it’s a real challenge to Sarah Palin.  But it’s probably worse for Mitt Romney, who now has two successful governors running on the conservative executive platform.  Hard to imagine Rick Perry trying PerryCare in Texas.

All of which is a good thing.  What the Republican party needs right now is a good, robust primary season.  WIth Rick Perry in the race, it will be even robust-er.

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  1. Profile Photo Contributor
    @user_59824

    I like Rick Perry because I like pro-business pols. Under his gubernatorial leadership, Texas has attracted an impressive number of new “makers of the donuts.”

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    @TheKingPrawn

    I welcome any credible primary challengers, even Texans. (Blazing Saddles quotes just got paraphrased in my head…)

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    @DanielSattelberger

    Having Perry in the race would be great.

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    @MikeLaRoche

    Perry has been a great governor for us Texans over the past decade and I know he’d be a fine president. However…what if Perry and Palin both enter the race? Reckon it’d be quite a quandary for this “Leninist cultist”…

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    @JoeEscalante

    texas-elk1.jpgThese days, smart people are moving to Texas, not California .This was not the case when Bush was Gov. This is a recent phenomenon. He’s got to take some credit for that.

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    @MikeLaRoche

    The smartest people moved here back in the 1700s, getting in on the ground floor of this venture.

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    @PaulARahe

    Newt’s guys are jumping from the frying pan into the fire (where perhaps they belong). A Texas governor who even suggests the possibility of secession is not ready for the national stage and never will be.

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    @StuartCreque
    Mike LaRoche: Perry has been a great governor for us Texans over the past decade and I know he’d be a fine president. However…what if Perry and Palin both enter the race? Reckon it’d be quite a quandary for this “Leninist cultist”… · Jun 9 at 2:43pm

    Edited on Jun 09 at 02:43 pm

    It would be good to have such choices in life.

    I only worry that if they split the same blocs of support in the GOP, they could let other folks squeak by.

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    @MikeLaRoche
    Paul A. Rahe: Newt’s guys are jumping from the frying pan into the fire (where perhaps they belong). A Texas governor who even suggests the possibility of secession is not ready for the national stage and never will be. · Jun 9 at 3:06pm

    Here in Texas, saying that is about as controversial as rooting for the Dallas Cowboys. Besides, I agree with him.

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    @MikeLaRoche
    Stuart Creque

    Mike LaRoche: Perry has been a great governor for us Texans over the past decade and I know he’d be a fine president. However…what if Perry and Palin both enter the race? Reckon it’d be quite a quandary for this “Leninist cultist”… · Jun 9 at 2:43pm

    Edited on Jun 09 at 02:43 pm

    It would be good to have such choices in life.

    I only worry that if they split the same blocs of support in the GOP, they could let other folks squeak by. · Jun 9 at 3:09pm

    That’s a valid concern, and I share it. I hope that by the beginning of the primary season next year, there will be one strong and principled conservative candidate to unite behind. The Republican Party cannot afford John McCain: the Sequel.

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    @wilberforge
    Paul A. Rahe: Newt’s guys are jumping from the frying pan into the fire (where perhaps they belong). A Texas governor who even suggests the possibility of secession is not ready for the national stage and never will be. · Jun 9 at 3:06pm

    Texans do have somewhat different take on things, primarily, idividuality and not being told what to do…. So secession is basically a Nose Thumbing display. Perhaps that display might help if more joined in and said Enough Already… Unclear as to Perry passing muste here. Must return to consulting tea leave and reading entrails now, have to get up to speed with all the learned conjurers here….

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    @JackRichman
    Paul A. Rahe: A Texas governor who even suggests the possibility of secession is not ready for the national stage and never will be. · Jun 9 at 3:06pm

    I agree it’s a serious misstep, but the linked article is considerably less inflammatory than much of the reporting of the incident at the time. He seemed to walk back the suggestion immediately. I don’t think it should disqualify Perry from throwing his hat in the ring. I trust the voters to decide if this was a serious suggestion or just the kind of loose talk one is apt to hear when politicians are called upon to keep talking extemporaneously.

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    @Kofola
    Mike LaRoche

    Paul A. Rahe: Newt’s guys are jumping from the frying pan into the fire (where perhaps they belong). A Texas governor who even suggests the possibility of secession is not ready for the national stage and never will be. · Jun 9 at 3:06pm

    Here in Texas, saying that is about as controversial as rooting for the Dallas Cowboys. Besides, I agree with him.
    wilber forge

    Texans do have somewhat different take on things, primarily, idividuality and not being told what to do…. So secession is basically a Nose Thumbing display.

    I was going to point this out myself, but you guys beat me to the punch. As a Texan myself, I find Perry’s comments on the matter completely unexceptional. Secession is kind of a running joke for Texans, one that even largely apolitical people regularly make. I don’t think I know anyone who’s legitimately serious about it. Although I can understand why you’d be so concerned to see us go! ;)

    Besides, if you’re really concerned about Perry leading Texas out of the Union, there’s one way to ensure it won’t happen: elect him President of the United States.

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    @JohnMarzan

    can’t wait when his campaign starts comparing texas’ rise to california’s decline. california will be rick perry’s prop in 2012.

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    @HangOn

    The problem with Perry is purely electoral. What does he add to Republican chances in 2012? He’s from Texas, and the cultural differences with other parts of the country are real. The secession thing shows that. Perry is going to have a huge and probably insurmountable problem in the northeast. He is going to have a huge though surmountable problem in the midwest. The parts of the country where he will not have cultural difference problems are Republican base anyway. This is an election that should center on the economy and Obama’s disastrous handling of the economy. Bringing culture warfare into this works to Obama’s advantage.

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    @PaulARahe
    Hang On: The problem with Perry is purely electoral. What does he add to Republican chances in 2012? He’s from Texas, and the cultural differences with other parts of the country are real. The secession thing shows that. Perry is going to have a huge and probably insurmountable problem in the northeast. He is going to have a huge though surmountable problem in the midwest. The parts of the country where he will not have cultural difference problems are Republican base anyway. This is an election that should center on the economy and Obama’s disastrous handling of the economy. Bringing culture warfare into this works to Obama’s advantage. · Jun 10 at 7:32am

    Yes, indeed. Is there anyone who seriously thinks that a Governor of Texas who has hinted at the possibility of secession can defeat this country’s first sitting African-American President? Perry may be a fine Governor of Texas, but he has blotted his copybook. He is not ready for the national stage and he never will be.

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    @MollieHemingway
    Paul A. Rahe

    Yes, indeed. Is there anyone who seriously thinks that a Governor of Texas who has hinted at the possibility of secession can defeat this country’s first sitting African-American President? Perry may be a fine Governor of Texas, but he has blotted his copybook. He is not ready for the national stage and he never will be. · Jun 10 at 7:41am

    I don’t think I’ve met a Texan who hasn’t talked about secession. I don’t know much about Perry, but I’m pretty sure voters care more about something Jennifer Rubin pointed out this morning:

    Because of statistics like this, Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) would be a formidable candidate. “Some 37% of all net new American jobs since the recovery began were created in Texas

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    @michaelkelley
    Paul A. Rahe: A Texas governor who even suggests the possibility of secession is not ready for the national stage and never will be. · Jun 9 at 3:06pm

    I have no clear opinion yet on Governor Perry but I would humbly submit that Americans traditionally like a cowboy who talks tough.

    I seem to remember a certain President from California back in the 80’s, before the fall of the Soviet Union, who pretended he did not know that his microphone was hot and quipped during a sound check,

    “My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in 5 minutes.”

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    @Kofola
    Paul A. Rahe

    Hang On:

    Every Republican is going to have an insurmountable problem in the Northeast: the R next to his or her name. Having a Texan is helpful regionally because Texas bridges the South and the West and helps solidify the swing states in those regions.

    To the degree that the secession thing is an issue, it would be the mainstream media morphing it from a Texan thing (rooted in its historical and cultural sense of independence) into scare tactic, neo-confederate thing. Maybe I’m overestimating the average American voter, but I’m disinclined to believe that they’d rank something so nominally inconsequential over an excellent record on the most importance issue to most voters: jobs. If voters in the jobs desperate Midwest were to do so, well that would be straight dumb-founding.

    Granted, I’m not entirely sold on Perry. However, I’m also not disqualifying him from the queue of likely candidates that I’m still seriously considering.

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    @Pseudodionysius

    “My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in 5 minutes.”

    I still roar every time I hear those lines. I miss him.

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    @Douglas

    If Perry actually gets into this, then it’s now just a race for who will be his Veep nominee.

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    @Pseudodionysius

    I don’t think I’ve met a Texan who hasn’t talked about secession.

    Nor I.

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    @user_59824
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.

    Paul A. Rahe

    Yes, indeed. Is there anyone who seriously thinks that a Governor of Texas who has hinted at the possibility of secession can defeat this country’s first sitting African-American President? Perry may be a fine Governor of Texas, but he has blotted his copybook. He is not ready for the national stage and he never will be. · Jun 10 at 7:41am

    I don’t think I’ve met a Texan who hasn’t talked about secession.

    Me neither, Mollie, and I’m referring to the many Texans I befriended and roomed with in college, so this discussion has been going on for, shall we say, a good while! :-)

    It’s an integral part of a Texan’s DNA- particularly if y’all are from the big “D”……

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  24. Profile Photo Member
    @HangOn
    Kofola

    Paul A. Rahe

    Hang On:

    Every Republican is going to have an insurmountable problem in the Northeast: the R next to his or her name. Having a Texan is helpful regionally because Texas bridges the South and the West and helps solidify the swing states in those regions.

    Edited on Jun 10 at 10:28 am

    You think too small. Republicans do win the in the northeast on the local and state level. When the economy is in the tank, and your candidate is talking about economics and not being diverted by the ridiculous, you’ve got a good chance. At a minimum you force the other guys to fight on what should be their territory. The other thing is, if the battle is in the northeast, the upper midwest is already gone and the question is the size of the landslide.

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    @Kofola
    Hang On

    You think too small. Republicans do win the in the northeast on the local and state level. When the economy is in the tank, and your candidate is talking about economics and not being diverted by the ridiculous, you’ve got a good chance. · Jun 10 at 12:04pm

    Democrats also win on the local and state level in the South, but you don’t see them trying to make it the bedrock of their presidential campaign strategy.

    This is a pipe dream. If things get so bad for Obama politically that there’s a threat that he loses New England, the Republicans would have to field a much worse candidate than Rick Perry to still screw it up. I have a hard time seeing this election being unlike the past several, where the winner is based roughly on whoever takes the majority of the Midwest and Florida.

    On the campaign turning to the ridiculous: you do realize who our opponent is, right? Ryan, the all-around ‘safest’ of the potential candidates, isn’t even running yet, and they’re already showing videos of him throwing grandma off of a cliff.

    • #25

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