No More Huevos Rancheros…

 

Last year around this time I went to have some Sunday Brunch at one of my favorite restaurants, Las Alamedas. I usually had Huevos Rancheros, three sunny-side-up eggs with salsa, refried beans, and tortillas. Oh, and a Gold Margarita on the rocks.

It was the beginning of the pandemic, and I took some pictures because it was so quiet. I usually would sit outside on the patio, and the little park area was generally full of little kids running around, jumping and doing flips, being loud. My only companion on this day was a crow, hoping I would drop a tortilla chip he could scarf up.

Yesterday, a Sunday, I checked to see if they had opened up again, because I had a hankering for some Huevos Rancheros.

Permanently closed.

Greg Abbott opened up Texas, but it was too little, too late. I wonder how many thousands of other businesses couldn’t weather the storm. A pandemic that 99 percent recover from, a pandemic that eradicated the flu.

Las Alamedas had been a Houston area favorite since the 1980s. An institution really. It will be missed.

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  1. Juliana Member
    Juliana
    @Juliana

    I ‘liked’ your post, but I don’t like the message.

    • #1
  2. Henry Racette Contributor
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    I spent about half my growing up years in New Mexico, and huevos rancheros is still my first choice for breakfast whenever available. Sorry about the restaurant, and of the thousands of others similarly wrecked by our overzealous public officials.

    But I’m glad your state has reopened. Someone else will be eager to serve you breakfast soon.

    • #2
  3. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    Juliana (View Comment):

    I ‘liked’ your post, but I don’t like the message.

    Ditto.

    • #3
  4. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    That is a terrible outcome. What is it like around the area with other places?  I got a text from a friend in MA who is going to visit her mom in FL for Easter. She said her mom finally got the vaccine (shot 1 of 2), and she will most certainly get it and I am guessing, possible her kids too.  She said it is very different up there compared to here in Florida. She went to visit a friend in Vermont, and she said that there are businesses up there that will not allow (?) people from out of state to even enter an establishment unless they can prove they have quarantined for the last ten days!!!!!!! This is from one state to another – not an overseas trip!  Are you kidding?

    • #4
  5. Jan Coolidge
    Jan
    @ChileGirl

    That’s a real shame.  It has happened to so many good restaurants. Heartbreaking. But at least Abbot has had some… courage… lately. 

    In New Mexico, the wicked munchkin Govnah is still hard at work closing businesses. In Dońa Ana county, because healthy people are not getting tested, the percentage of positives has forced the closing down, again, of restaurants. This, after being allowed to open for2 weeks.  I suggested a stealth campaign to get healthy people to test, but that is asking a lot. 

    The part that really chaps is that she will probably be elected again when the time comes.  

    • #5
  6. Captain French Moderator
    Captain French
    @AlFrench

    Portland was known as one of the best restaurant cities in the country, after NY, LA and Chicago. No more. Many have closed permanently. Many more have closed “temporarily”, and may never reopen. It will take years to come back, if it ever does.

    • #6
  7. Marythefifth Member
    Marythefifth
    @Marythefifth

    The lack of curiosity from journalists of all persuasions has been newsworthy in itself. This worldwide lockdown is a First. Nobody in media cares how it affects individuals anywhere. Or perhaps they are already confident their audience isn’t interested. But dagnabbit, what might it have meant if high profile conservative Twitter users had taken turns tweeting (interviewed) individuals’ stories of loss and hardships every day? Going from city to city listing how many local businesses are gone for good and number of employees affected. Then there’s the 3rd world ripple effect that needs to be shown, too. 

    • #7
  8. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Marythefifth (View Comment):

    The lack of curiosity from journalists of all persuasions has been newsworthy in itself. This worldwide lockdown is a First. Nobody in media cares how it affects individuals anywhere. Or perhaps they are already confident their audience isn’t interested. But dagnabbit, what might it have meant if high profile conservative Twitter users had taken turns tweeting (interviewed) individuals’ stories of loss and hardships every day? Going from city to city listing how many local businesses are gone for good and number of employees affected. Then there’s the 3rd world ripple effect that needs to be shown, too.

    If only we had reliable, responsible news media.

    • #8
  9. harrisventures Coolidge
    harrisventures
    @harrisventures

    I was a regular at Las Alamedas. Did brunch at least once or twice a month. Knew a lot of the wait staff by sight, some by name. Sometimes I would get my Gold Margarita before I even ordered anything.

    All of those people, probably close to a hundred employees, unemployed.

    The human toll, the economic toll, of what was essentially a mild flu, has been enormous.

    Truly a sad situation.

    • #9
  10. harrisventures Coolidge
    harrisventures
    @harrisventures

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    I spent about half my growing up years in New Mexico, and huevos rancheros is still my first choice for breakfast whenever available. Sorry about the restaurant, and of the thousands of others similarly wrecked by our overzealous public officials.

    But I’m glad your state has reopened. Someone else will be eager to serve you breakfast soon.

    There will be new restaurants, new entrepreneurs starting new ventures. It will be like the dam has been broken, and GDP will spike.

    This will be known as the ‘Biden Recovery’.

    • #10
  11. Captain French Moderator
    Captain French
    @AlFrench

    harrisventures (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    I spent about half my growing up years in New Mexico, and huevos rancheros is still my first choice for breakfast whenever available. Sorry about the restaurant, and of the thousands of others similarly wrecked by our overzealous public officials.

    But I’m glad your state has reopened. Someone else will be eager to serve you breakfast soon.

    There will be new restaurants, new entrepreneurs starting new ventures. It will be like the dam has been broken, and GDP will spike.

    This will be known as the ‘Biden Recovery’.

    Sad, but true.

    • #11
  12. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge
    Gazpacho Grande'
    @ChrisCampion

    harrisventures (View Comment):

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    I spent about half my growing up years in New Mexico, and huevos rancheros is still my first choice for breakfast whenever available. Sorry about the restaurant, and of the thousands of others similarly wrecked by our overzealous public officials.

    But I’m glad your state has reopened. Someone else will be eager to serve you breakfast soon.

    There will be new restaurants, new entrepreneurs starting new ventures. It will be like the dam has been broken, and GDP will spike.

    This will be known as the ‘Biden Kamala Recovery’.

    FIFY.

    • #12
  13. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge
    Gazpacho Grande'
    @ChrisCampion

    Loss.  It’s not just a tasty plate of huevos rancheros (which I now want for breakfast).  It’s the hundreds of thousands and millions of meals that went unordered – all the supply chain for the food itself, the beverage supply chain, the waitstaff, the cooks, the management, all gone.  Just gone.

    The experiences were lost, too – meeting friends and family for brunch?  Gone.  Going out to lunch with co-workers?  Gone.  Zipping out for dinner after work?  Gone.  Anniversary dinner at the place where you went on your first date with your wife?

    Gone.

    Why?  Our government is far too large.  And we seem to be incapable of self-correction.

    • #13
  14. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    harrisventures: Last year around this time I went to have some Sunday Brunch at one of my favorite restaurants, Las Alamedas. I usually had Huevos Rancheros, three sunny-side-up eggs with salsa, refried beans, and tortillas. Oh, and a Gold Margarita on the rocks.

    My kind of breakfast . . .

    harrisventures:

    Permanently closed.

    Greg Abbott opened up Texas, but it was too little, too late.

    It’s a crying shame so many favorite restaurants and other businesses closed permanently because of excessive restrictions.  By excessive, I mean they made sense in the short term, but once we knew what we were dealing with, they became devastating.

    • #14
  15. Buckpasser Member
    Buckpasser
    @Buckpasser

    This was all thanks to our state and federal government.  It had nothing to do with the wuflu.

    • #15
  16. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    Very early on in the lockdowns the authors of the Great Barrington Declaration (arguably the three top epidemiologists in the world) strongly advised against the lockdowns, virtually calling them a crime against humanity. And so they have turned out to be. They also made sane recommendations for responding to the pandemic, including protecting the vulnerable, but not cutting off our nose to spite our face as our masters have done; but they were shadowed banned by Google and ignored by the Fauci’s of the world.  Were there any justice or reason in the world, most of the directors in this farce would be in the Hague under indictment for crimes against humanity. But we live in a post-Enlightenment world, wherein reality is denied (in my view, the fatal flaw of the Enlightenment, so-called by those who considered themselves “enlightened,” was that it denied ultimate reality from the start, e.g., that humans are spiritual, transcendent beings–which idea the “enlightened” called casuistry–which denial led directly to our current predicament), and the lethal progressive delusions of our political masters  are shoved down our throats as the good, the true, and the beautiful.

    The loudest voices against the madness seem to be coming from conservative and libertarian economists, like Don Boudreaux, though even Dr. Boudreaux has been induced to (inappropriately in my view) apologize for his (highly accurate) characterization of many of his fellow libertarians as missing in action as this great crime is foisted on us. I would second his view (which he has retracted) that those who have remained silent have done so out of misplaced fear, excessive caution, and concern about the prospect of their own cancellation by the mad Progressives, eager to retain their place of esteem in an increasingly mad society, unfortunately (which of course will do them no good).

    • #16
  17. Chuck Thatcher
    Chuck
    @Chuckles

    Please tell me Molina’s is still in business.

    If not Molina’s, what about Ninfa’s on Navigation?

    If they’re both gone I no longer have any reason to visit Houston.

    PS the house pictured on your profile sure looks like one I used to drive past regularly en route to BHP’s office from my office a ways farther out west.

    • #17