Contributor Post Created with Sketch. So Much for Impeachment: McConnell Won’t Reconvene Senate

 

When Nancy Pelosi moved forward on impeachment Monday, I said it was likely all for show rather than for removing President Trump from office. This just in — it was all for show.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s (R-Ky.) office told Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer’s (D-N.Y.) staff on Wednesday that the GOP will not agree to reconvene the Senate before Jan. 19 to allow an impeachment trial while President Trump is still in office.

A senior Senate Republican aide confirmed that McConnell’s office reached out to Schumer’s office to relay the message that Republicans will not agree to a Friday session to enable House Democrats to present articles of impeachment to the Senate while Trump is in office.

McConnell said in a memo circulated to colleagues last week that the Senate will not be able to handle business on the floor until senators are scheduled to return to Washington on Jan. 19 unless all 100 senators agree to reconvene sooner.

Since Vice President Pence won’t invoke the 25th Amendment, Donald Trump will complete his term as President, unless he decides to resign. This just in — he’s not going to resign.

Of course, impeachment can continue after Biden is inaugurated and Chuck Schumer becomes Senate Majority Leader. But, by then, what’s the point? It won’t be viewed as “saving the Republic from Trump,” but just another petulant partisan battle. President Biden’s “first 100 days” agenda will be mired in the muck, including any additional COVID relief checks. If you think Americans are generally annoyed now, try delaying financial assistance so Democrats can shout “orange man bad” for another month.

As the Capitol Hill Riot was wrapping up, I infamously advised “Impeach. Remove. Bar from Office.” In order for that to happen, Pelosi would have needed to deliver the impeachment article to the Senate by the end of last week. Emotions were high enough in both parties for removal to have any chance of getting through. There was also great concern (myself included) that Trump would keep stirring the pot and spark further violence in DC and around the country.

Instead, Trump has been quiet as a Twitterless church mouse, MAGAntifa attackers have been rounded up, and no new violence has erupted.

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  1. Front Seat Cat Member

    I hope all of the above is true. What is this story about protests at all the state houses? I don’t think impeachment will do anything but encourage that. It’s been so stressful – everyday life, earning a living, trying to stay well, pay the bills. I hope we can get through the rest of the month with no more turmoil. You are right about the Biden administration having their hands full when they take the reins – hope they are up to the task.

    • #1
    • January 13, 2021, at 11:15 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  2. RufusRJones Member

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: Of course, impeachment can continue after Biden is inaugurated

    This is very debatable. I don’t see it based on what I’ve heard.

    • #2
    • January 13, 2021, at 11:18 AM PST
    • Like
  3. Metalheaddoc Member
    Metalheaddoc Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    The Constitution says a President can be impeached. Trump won’t be President when the senate reconvenes. He will be a private citizen. Then the whole process becomes a Bill of Attainder, doesn’t it?

    • #3
    • January 13, 2021, at 11:22 AM PST
    • 10 likes
  4. ape2ag Member

    I think McConnell’s trial balloon got shot down.

    • #4
    • January 13, 2021, at 11:25 AM PST
    • 5 likes
  5. Hoyacon Member

    The point of continuing impeachment after Biden’s inauguration would be pretty much the same as initiating it now–revenge and the use of invective.

    #AmericaUnited

    • #5
    • January 13, 2021, at 11:31 AM PST
    • 7 likes
  6. The Cloaked Gaijin Member

    So Much for Impeachment: McConnell Won’t Reconvene Senate

    Well, I could provide the obvious punchline, but I think I will skip it.

    • #6
    • January 13, 2021, at 11:51 AM PST
    • 1 like
  7. CACrabtree Coolidge

    So, it’s yet another case of “Full of sound and fury; signifying nothing”. More scraps thrown to the baying hounds on both sides.

    Meanwhile, seven thousand miles away, our enemy watches silently, smiling at our idiocy.

    • #7
    • January 13, 2021, at 11:54 AM PST
    • 8 likes
  8. Paul Dougherty Member

    Everyone gets what they want, well except for part of the Republicans and unaffiliated moderates. If seventy percent of Republicans want Trump viable as a force in four years, they don’t want him impeached. The Democrats want Trump running as Republican in four years so they don’t want to impeach. Ironically, Sen. McConnell bails out the Dems from blame by their constituents. They can continue the bluff that they need and demand removal, but for Mitch!

    • #8
    • January 13, 2021, at 12:44 PM PST
    • Like
  9. MichaelKennedy Inactive

    Instead, Trump has been quiet as a Twitterless church mouse, MAGAntifa attackers have been rounded up, and no new violence has erupted.

    Twitter cancelled him. Gab has his entire Twitter history but that will probably wait until the stolen election is completed. The Antifa cadre that organized the Capitol riot will mostly disappear as they did in Portland and Minneapolis. A few Trump supporters will be pursued by the FBI as a holy quest and probably wind up with 10 year prison terms. You know what DC juries are like. If you don’t, consider that Geoffrey Craig (D) was acquitted of the same charge that sent Manafor to solitary confinement.

    • #9
    • January 13, 2021, at 12:46 PM PST
    • 5 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  10. JimGoneWild Coolidge

    I thought an impeachment has to take place in one session of Congress, not 2.

    • #10
    • January 13, 2021, at 1:25 PM PST
    • 1 like
  11. MarciN Member

    There’s only one reason I can think of for this change of mind among the Beltway Republicans. They are seeing a negative reaction from the public, which Internet traffic and aggregators allow them to see instantly, as those opinions are being posted. 

    • #11
    • January 13, 2021, at 1:27 PM PST
    • 1 like
  12. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… Member

    Jon, thanks for the update.

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: Of course, impeachment can continue after Biden is inaugurated and Chuck Schumer becomes Senate Majority Leader. But, by then, what’s the point? It won’t be viewed as “saving the Republic from Trump,” but just another petulant partisan battle. President Biden’s “first 100 days” agenda will be mired in the muck, including any additional COVID relief checks. If you think Americans are generally annoyed now, try delaying financial assistance so Democrats can shout “orange man bad” for another month.

    It’s not clear whether the impeachment proceeding can continue after Trump leaves office. Byron York’s podcast yesterday (here) argues that it cannot, and he quotes a federal judge on the issue.

    I think that it’s an unsettled question.

    • #12
    • January 13, 2021, at 1:43 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  13. Hoyacon Member

    Trump impeached.

    For the record, House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump:

    Katko (NY)

    Cheney (Wy)

    Kinzinger (Ill)

    Upton (Mich)

    Beautler (Wash)

    Newhouse (Wash)

    Meijer (Mich)

    Rice (SC)

    Gonzalez (Oh)

    Valadao (Cal)

    • #13
    • January 13, 2021, at 1:52 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  14. jmelvin Member

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Trump impeached.

    For the record, House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump:

    Katko (NY)

    Cheney (Wy)

    Kinzinger (Ill)

    Upton (Mich)

    Beautler (Wash)

    Newhouse (Wash)

    Meijer (Mich)

    Rice (SC)

    Gonzalez (Oh)

    Valadao (Cal)

    And he’s going nowhere. Haaa haa!

    I have real issues with the dude, but this is hilarious!

    • #14
    • January 13, 2021, at 1:58 PM PST
    • Like
  15. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: This just in — it was all for show.

    Except the “bar from office” provision is still in play, right? Isn’t that really what this is all about: barring Trump from running again in 2024?

    • #15
    • January 13, 2021, at 2:52 PM PST
    • Like
  16. Sisyphus Member
    Sisyphus Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: This just in — it was all for show.

    Except the “bar from office” provision is still in play, right? Isn’t that really what this is all about: barring Trump from running again in 2024?

    Yes, but the legal argument from Dershowitz and, I suppose, York is that the process is only available for a subject that is currently holding office. And Jerry, above, is probably right that that is an open question, at least.

    • #16
    • January 13, 2021, at 3:09 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  17. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Sisyphus (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: This just in — it was all for show.

    Except the “bar from office” provision is still in play, right? Isn’t that really what this is all about: barring Trump from running again in 2024?

    Yes, but the legal argument from Dershowitz and, I suppose, York is that the process is only available for a subject that is currently holding office. And Jerry, above, is probably right that that is an open question, at least.

    His lawyers could certainly present that in his defense at the trial, and then I guess it would be up to either Justice Roberts or the full Senate to vote on whether or not they agree.

    • #17
    • January 13, 2021, at 3:18 PM PST
    • 1 like
  18. Clifford A. Brown Contributor

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    Jon Gabriel, Ed.: This just in — it was all for show.

    Except the “bar from office” provision is still in play, right? Isn’t that really what this is all about: barring Trump from running again in 2024?

    That is a possible punishment, in addition to removal from office. Both seem to depend on the office holder being an office holder, not a former office holder.

    • #18
    • January 13, 2021, at 3:21 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  19. Manny Member

    I don’t understand the notion of holding an impeachment trial after Trump is out of office. Makes no sense. Has the Supreme Court ruled on the constitutionality of it?

    Anyway, I’m glad the Senate won’t take this up. Let’s just start clean as we take on the role of the opposition. 

    • #19
    • January 13, 2021, at 3:34 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  20. Hoyacon Member

    Manny (View Comment):

    I don’t understand the notion of holding an impeachment trial after Trump is out of office. Makes no sense. Has the Supreme Court ruled on the constitutionality of it?

    Anyway, I’m glad the Senate won’t take this up. Let’s just start clean as we take on the role of the opposition.

    Since the primary result of impeachment is removal, and there is no need for removal once Trump is gone, it seems obvious that the motivation is hatred/revenge.

    • #20
    • January 13, 2021, at 4:02 PM PST
    • 2 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  21. 9thDistrictNeighbor Member

     “Bills of attainder . . . are such special acts of the legislature, as inflict capital punishments upon persons supposed to be guilty of high offences, such as treason and felony, without any conviction in the ordinary course of judicial proceedings. If an act inflicts a milder degree of punishment than death, it is called a bill of pains and penalties. . . . In such cases, the legislature assumes judicial magistracy, pronouncing upon the guilt of the party without any of the common forms and guards of trial, and satisfying itself with proofs, when such proofs are within its reach, whether they are conformable to the rules of evidence, or not. In short, in all such cases, the legislature exercises the highest power of sovereignty, and what may be properly deemed an irresponsible despotic discretion, being governed solely by what it deems political necessity or expediency, and too often under the influence of unreasonable fears, or unfounded suspicions.” [3 J. Story, Commentaries on The Constitution of The United States 1338 (1833).]

    (Emphasis added.)

    • #21
    • January 13, 2021, at 4:14 PM PST
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    • This comment has been edited.
  22. Sisyphus Member
    Sisyphus Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    I don’t understand the notion of holding an impeachment trial after Trump is out of office. Makes no sense. Has the Supreme Court ruled on the constitutionality of it?

    Anyway, I’m glad the Senate won’t take this up. Let’s just start clean as we take on the role of the opposition.

    Since the primary result of impeachment is removal, and there is not need for removal once Trump is gone, it seems obvious that the motivation is hatred/revenge.

    It is also a tacit admission that he would crush them politically if he ran again. Better to deplatform him and leave his followers to wander in the wilderness without a voice in Washington. The other surprise of the coverage of the Capitol riot was the number of Capitol police who were willing to express support for Trump, before and after. With Marxist Democrats and Corporatists colluding to destroy the wages of average Americans by every means available, a return to Obamaism where the definition of prosperity is access to food stamps, Trump could draw more votes come 2023. 

    As far as passing on the mantle goes, Trump may be worse than Teddy Roosevelt, who famously destroyed his party by bucking his own handpicked successor.

    • #22
    • January 13, 2021, at 4:16 PM PST
    • 2 likes