Where Now, Republicans?

 

Pickett’s Charge, Battle of Gettysburg, 1863.

Republicans were reeling before last week’s criminal breach of the US Capitol. But that breach, led by lunatics who deserve serious jail time, tossed Democrats a cudgel with which to drive a wedge between pro- and anti-Trump Republicans.

It reminds me of the infamous “Pickett’s charge” during the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863. General George Pickett led his Confederate troops in an ill-fated charge across an open field in an effort to break the center of the Union line. It failed, but the Democrat’s own version of Pickett’s charge, with the artillery cover of the Capitol “insurrection,” has indeed breached the GOP middle. And how has the GOP responded? By shooting at each other.

I saw evidence of it on my now former Facebook page yesterday. Otherwise intelligent Washingtonians and anti-Trumper Republicans, the same ones who said little to nothing while over 200 cities were pummeled with violence this past summer, expect everyone to clutch their pearls and demand Trump’s immediate removal. And if you don’t, you support the insurrectionists and need to learn history (or, more accurately, “reeducation”). That all sounds familiar, and not in a good way. There is no nuance, no exceptions, and zero appreciation for history or self-awareness. With “friends” like this, who needs enemies?

Smarter, more dispassionate, and clear-eyed Republicans with some appreciation for history understand this. They know the party has been here before. After 1930. After 1958. After 1964. After 1974. After 1992. After 2008, when Barack Obama and the Democrats had a massive majority in the House and, for a time, a filibuster-proof Senate. It is time for some retrospection about events and to reengineer things for 2022 and beyond.

The path forward is not complicated, but not easy to traverse.

Let’s look at what has happened to the GOP over the past four years, from a 30,000-foot perspective.

The Republican Party has become an increasingly personality-driven party. It is the party not known widely for its successful policies and actions over the past four years, but as “The Party of Trump.” For all of Trump’s undeniable success and record of achievement, that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda-driven party – lower taxes, less government, a strong economy, safe neighborhoods, good schools, and peace through strength.

But what has America been hearing the past several months? The election is rigged or stolen. But vote Republican anyway! How did that work out in Georgia’s January 5 US Senate runoff elections? They’ve also seen Republicans shoot at each over the failure, in many minds, to give election law violations and irregularities (if not outright fraud) a fair hearing, especially by the courts. When some in Congress tried to provide such a hearing, consistent with the Electoral Count Act, the Capitol insurrection led by a few QAnon nuts and criminals undermined it and turned some House and Senate members into pariahs and targets for marginalization and outright cancelation. Ultimately, the job of exposing election illegalities fell to state legislatures, and they mostly punted.

That’s where we are. What now?

Republicans cannot allow Democrats to succeed in driving a wedge between Republicans. Republicans, for their part, need to focus their sights on two things: rediscovering their agenda (their “brand”) and combatting Democratic excesses that are sure to come. They always do.

A forward-looking, optimistic agenda that resonates with our new, emerging multi-ethnic working-class base should also help bring suburban voters turned off by Trump back into the fold. Restoring our economic strength by smartly ending the badly-implemented lockdowns; reforming and building good schools run by parents and focused on critical thinking, not indoctrination; safe neighborhoods; and military strength to preserve the peace and reign in an emergent communist power in Asia. Add “Big Tech” censorship and election reform (at the state level) to the list as well, but those may not resonate as well with voters we need to attract.

While Trump isn’t going away – Democrats hope he doesn’t, and fully intend for him to serve as an albatross around GOP necks the next four years – there is no doubt that Republicans had successes at the local, state, and US House level in 2020. Republicans need to build on those successes to capture more seats at the local, state, and congressional levels with a focus on capturing a House if not a Senate majority in 2022.

Part of that will be allowing new spokespeople and leaders to step forward. The RNC should consider naming a new lead spokesman for the party. Someone not running for President who has the respect of House and Senate leaders, as well as GOP governors. A leader or leaders with sharp minds, quick wits, and a pleasant demeanor, who don’t clearly and cleanly fall into a “never” or “pro” Trump group trap. Leave the party machinery to the estimable current RNC chair Ronna McDaniel.

Who are some of the new spokespeople the GOP should promote? US Sen. Tim Scott, R-SC. US Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-NY. Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson, R-NC. US Rep. Mike Garcia, R-CA. New US Rep. Tony Gonzalez (R-TX). That’s a younger, geographically and racially diverse group of leaders with great personal stories and inclusive messages, most of whom are also serious, articulate legislators. There are others, but those come to mind. And the leaders need not come from the ranks of the elected, but successful community activists, business leaders, educators, and elsewhere.

Lastly, Republicans of all stripes need to show some grace and stop focusing their guns on each other. Never Trumpers should stop disparaging pro-Trump Republicans, and learn to listen. Pro-Trumpers should focus less on tribalism, accept the reality of the moment, reject lawlessness, and work constructively to build on their successes of the past four-plus years. Republicans cannot afford to lose members of either camp. Both sides are guilty of shouting past each other and possessing an “either-or” mentality. How is that working out for you? Both wings of the party are needed for a successful flight.

The hard part is trying to achieve this in the face of media, cultural, and educational headwinds. The questions are, who will lead, and will anyone follow?

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  1. JamesSalerno Coolidge
    JamesSalerno
    @JamesSalerno

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/replace-kevin-mccarthy-with-liz-cheney

    I see articles like this and hope the Republicans get everything they have coming.

    • #1
  2. JoelB Member
    JoelB
    @JoelB

    JamesSalerno (View Comment):

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/replace-kevin-mccarthy-with-liz-cheney

    I see articles like this and hope the Republicans get everything they have coming.

    Not much hope of reconciliation in that article is there?

    • #2
  3. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    This is an excellent post.  I regret that I have but one “like” to give to this post.

    • #3
  4. Chris Oler Coolidge
    Chris Oler
    @ChrisO

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    • #4
  5. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    Under Reagan, we adopted the three tenets of social conservatism, smaller government and a robust national defense.

    • #5
  6. Chris Oler Coolidge
    Chris Oler
    @ChrisO

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    Under Reagan, we adopted the three tenets of social conservatism, smaller government and a robust national defense.

    Yeah, only one of them was achieved, Gary, and the national debt was tripled. Guess who did shrink things, though?

    • #6
  7. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    Under Reagan, we adopted the three tenets of social conservatism, smaller government and a robust national defense.

    Maybe. Since then, though, social conservatism has been jettisoned, fiscal conservatism has been ignored, and robust national defense means radically different things to different people.

    • #7
  8. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    Ed G. (View Comment):

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    Under Reagan, we adopted the three tenets of social conservatism, smaller government and a robust national defense.

    Maybe. Since then, though, social conservatism has been jettisoned, fiscal conservatism has been ignored, and robust national defense means radically different things to different people.

    I have to wonder how many Americans are like me and would rather just be labeled Americans rather than Republicans or Democrats? I mean how many vices is one willing to be associated with just to be called a Party member?

    • #8
  9. ape2ag Member
    ape2ag
    @ape2ag

    Don’t look now, but Tulsi Gabbard is making a play for the MAGA base.  She’s outflanking jelly-spined Republicans on free speech, anti-trust, and election integrity.

    • #9
  10. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    ape2ag (View Comment):

    Don’t look now, but Tulsi Gabbard is making a play for the MAGA base. She’s outflanking jelly-spined Republicans on free speech, anti-trust, and election integrity.

    She’s behaving as a real American should.

    • #10
  11. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    I am sick of hearing “party of personality”. No one I know who supported Trump liked his personality. They had a gut-level feeling that he was the only member of the republican party who cared about and spoke for them. And they were right. 

    As far as the GOPe who hated and opposed him, they can … there’s that CoC again. 

    • #11
  12. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Django (View Comment):

    I am sick of hearing “party of personality”. No one I know who supported Trump liked his personality. They had a gut-level feeling that he was the only member of the republican party who cared about and spoke for them. And they were right.

    As far as the GOPe who hated and opposed him, they can … there’s that CoC again.

    EDIT: Now that I think about it more, the “party of personality” is and was the group who opposed him because of his personality. (When will I learn the difference between “edit” and “reply”? )

    • #12
  13. Bob Thompson Member
    Bob Thompson
    @BobThompson

    ape2ag (View Comment):

    Don’t look now, but Tulsi Gabbard is making a play for the MAGA base. She’s outflanking jelly-spined Republicans on free speech, anti-trust, and election integrity.

    How much longer will Tulsi Gabbard be a Democrat? I know she’s not communist and I don’t think she is a full-fledged socialist and the Democrats are moving leftward.

    • #13
  14. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    I think that overall the Capitol protesters entering the Capitol is just one of many excuses the Left would have used.  Seriously, but exaggeratedly, Trump could have spit on the side-walk (covid, you know) and the response would have been the same.  There is absolutely no reasonable and rational interpretation of the Capitol breach that would in any wall call for the vehemence, the unconstitutional response, and the evil that the Left is promulgating now.

    • #14
  15. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Oh, and when Nameless likes your article, you know something’s very wrong with its premise.

    • #15
  16. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    During Reagan.  Reagan was an actual conservative, not just someone who played one on tv.   There was an affirmative agenda of (1) entrepreneurial economics.   Getting government out of the way of the US economy.  (2) Strident anti Communism.   (3).  Strong national Defense.  On that agenda Reagan won re-election by a landslide of historic proportions. 

    Newt Gingrich and the Contract With America was introduced just weeks prior to the 1994 Congressional elections and resulted in the GOP gaining 54 House seats and 9 Senate seats – flipping control of both Houses.

    It can be done.   But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers.  It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    • #16
  17. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    During Reagan. Reagan was an actual conservative, not just someone who played one on tv. There was an affirmative agenda of (1) entrepreneurial economics. Getting government out of the way of the US economy. (2) Strident anti Communism. (3). Strong national Defense. On that agenda Reagan won re-election by a landslide of historic proportions.

    Newt Gingrich and the Contract With America was introduced just weeks prior to the 1994 Congressional elections and resulted in the GOP gaining 54 House seats and 9 Senate seats – flipping control of both Houses.

    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    That presumes a fair election process and the ability of Conservative voices to speak freely and unimpeded to the American electorate.    Both those things are in serious doubt today.  

    • #17
  18. SkipSul Inactive
    SkipSul
    @skipsul

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    It also takes people who understand that a huge part of politics is negotiation and bargaining.  Reagan made trade-offs to get what he wanted.  So did Newt.  There are folks in the Democratic party who can be persuaded on various issues to help out – find them and work with them.

    • #18
  19. Chris Oler Coolidge
    Chris Oler
    @ChrisO

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    I was lightly trolling, but also serious because the word ‘successful’ was in there. I would include Newt’s brief term as Speaker as well, and Reagan under your criteria.

    • #19
  20. DonG (2+2=5. Say it!) Coolidge
    DonG (2+2=5. Say it!)
    @DonG

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Bucknelldad: that is historically unfamiliar territory for a party that has always been, during its most successful days, an agenda driven party

    I’m confused, when was this? Abolition?

    Contract with America.

     

    The GOP needs to hire a marketing firm to learn how to craft a brand and deliver a message.   People choose their drinks, their cars, their shoes,… all by brand.  They vote by brand too.

    • #20
  21. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    SkipSul (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    It also takes people who understand that a huge part of politics is negotiation and bargaining. Reagan made trade-offs to get what he wanted. So did Newt. There are folks in the Democratic party who can be persuaded on various issues to help out – find them and work with them.

    “If someone offers you half a loaf, take it.” – RR

    You can ask for the other half tomorrow. – Ekosj

    • #21
  22. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    I was lightly trolling, but also serious because the word ‘successful’ was in there. I would include Newt’s brief term as Speaker as well, and Reagan under your criteria.

    The budget deficit did balloon under Reagan.  But, to be fair, every budget he proposed was labeled “Dead on Arrival” by Congress.   Even though taxes were cut, tax revenues increased (not in the first year).  But Congress increased spending even faster than revenue grew.

    • #22
  23. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    SkipSul (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    It also takes people who understand that a huge part of politics is negotiation and bargaining. Reagan made trade-offs to get what he wanted. So did Newt. There are folks in the Democratic party who can be persuaded on various issues to help out – find them and work with them.

    “If someone offers you half a loaf, take it.” – RR

    You can ask for the other half tomorrow. – Ekosj

    Absolutely! The problem for many years has been that we seem to ask (sometimes) for half, get nothing, then give away some of what we started with.

    We all want half a loaf today. A big chunk of us don’t believe that the Republican officeholders are interested in the same thing. Timid, incompetent, false – this is what we’ve gotten instead since the the late 90’s.

    • #23
  24. Pagodan Member
    Pagodan
    @MatthewBaylot

    Django (View Comment):

    I am sick of hearing “party of personality”. No one I know who supported Trump liked his personality. They had a gut-level feeling that he was the only member of the republican party who cared about and spoke for them. And they were right.

    As far as the GOPe who hated and opposed him, they can … there’s that CoC again.

    You may be sick of it, but it is true. You may not know anyone that likes his personality, but there are a lot that do. And there are even more that have a hard time accepting any criticism of him as a person or a leader, because it’s all just made up by the left-wing media or something. 2 Senators who won more votes in November lost the vote in January in part b/c Trump wasn’t on the ballot, and they had to play a game of pretending Trump was going to be President after January 20. 

    And this fantasy that he is the only member of the GOP who cared about them or spoke for them is crap too. You can look up my posts, I’m a far cry from Never Trump, or an apologist for the establishment GOP, but this view of Trump as the only conservative “savior” pretty much confirms “party of personality” claim. 

    Trump was unique. He came from outside government and politics. He has a weird humor and realness that is compelling. He did things that I don’t think other good conservative politicians would think of or have the guts to do (Executive order cancelling all diveristy and CRT trainings in the Federal government, re-locating Fed offices into states far away from DC, etc.) In the end though, he was also a unique liability, and my guess is the damage will overshadow the good.  

    • #24
  25. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Pagodan (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    I am sick of hearing “party of personality”. No one I know who supported Trump liked his personality. They had a gut-level feeling that he was the only member of the republican party who cared about and spoke for them. And they were right.

    As far as the GOPe who hated and opposed him, they can … there’s that CoC again.

    You may be sick of it, but it is true. You may not know anyone that likes his personality, but there are a lot that do. And there are even more that have a hard time accepting any criticism of him as a person or a leader, because it’s all just made up by the left-wing media or something. 2 Senators who won more votes in November lost the vote in January in part b/c Trump wasn’t on the ballot, and they had to play a game of pretending Trump was going to be President after January 20.

    And this fantasy that he is the only member of the GOP who cared about them or spoke for them is crap too. You can look up my posts, I’m a far cry from Never Trump, or an apologist for the establishment GOP, but this view of Trump as the only conservative “savior” pretty much confirms “party of personality” claim.

    Trump was unique. He came from outside government and politics. He has a weird humor and realness that is compelling. He did things that I don’t think other good conservative politicians would think of or have the guts to do (Executive order cancelling all diveristy and CRT trainings in the Federal government, re-locating Fed offices into states far away from DC, etc.) In the end though, he was also a unique liability, and my guess is the damage will overshadow the good.

    The criticisms were not only of him, they also focused on his supporters, calling them dumb, racist, naïve, etc.  I believe, though I can’t prove, that is why some took criticism of Trump personally. And it matters not at all that a few people liked his personality any more than it matters that David Brooks was fascinated with the crease in Obama’s slacks. 

    Who else cared about his supporters? If you think that is “crap”, name names. Most of the GOPe seemed embarrassed by them. 

    The highlighted part is just speculation. 

    Your last paragraph is something I can agree with. 

    • #25
  26. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Pagodan (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    I am sick of hearing “party of personality”. No one I know who supported Trump liked his personality. They had a gut-level feeling that he was the only member of the republican party who cared about and spoke for them. And they were right.

    As far as the GOPe who hated and opposed him, they can … there’s that CoC again.

    You may be sick of it, but it is true. You may not know anyone that likes his personality, but there are a lot that do. And there are even more that have a hard time accepting any criticism of him as a person or a leader, because it’s all just made up by the left-wing media or something. 2 Senators who won more votes in November lost the vote in January in part b/c Trump wasn’t on the ballot, and they had to play a game of pretending Trump was going to be President after January 20.

    And this fantasy that he is the only member of the GOP who cared about them or spoke for them is crap too. You can look up my posts, I’m a far cry from Never Trump, or an apologist for the establishment GOP, but this view of Trump as the only conservative “savior” pretty much confirms “party of personality” claim.

    Trump was unique. He came from outside government and politics. He has a weird humor and realness that is compelling. He did things that I don’t think other good conservative politicians would think of or have the guts to do (Executive order cancelling all diveristy and CRT trainings in the Federal government, re-locating Fed offices into states far away from DC, etc.) In the end though, he was also a unique liability, and my guess is the damage will overshadow the good.

    No, not a savior, but someone who was articulating the correct priorities and assessment of the landscape, and the only one credibly promising to fight. Yes the old “he fights” argument. The failures of the last two decades made that a convincing part.

    Now the Republicans are all poised to continue doing nothing about the craziness of the last five years, poised to get back to etiquette with the people who perpetrated Russia Collusion Hoax, Fine People Lie, Kavanaugh metoo-ism, phony Ukraine impeachment, Resistance, BAMN, etc. Any one of those things from that list should have been enough for all Republicans to shut it all down in righteous protest, to angrily demand and implement reform. As it is now it’s instead time to talk about persona, Q, and whataboutism.

    • #26
  27. Chris Oler Coolidge
    Chris Oler
    @ChrisO

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    Chris Oler (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    I was lightly trolling, but also serious because the word ‘successful’ was in there. I would include Newt’s brief term as Speaker as well, and Reagan under your criteria.

    The budget deficit did balloon under Reagan. But, to be fair, every budget he proposed was labeled “Dead on Arrival” by Congress. Even though taxes were cut, tax revenues increased (not in the first year). But Congress increased spending even faster than revenue grew.

    Yes, I remember that, too. I wasn’t laying blame, just stating a fact.

    • #27
  28. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    Ed G. (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    SkipSul (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):
    It can be done. But not by go-along-to-get-along’ers. It will take genuine conservative ideas, understanding of and belief in conservative philosophy to articulate these themes to America, and most importantly, the guts to fight for them AND implement them.

    It also takes people who understand that a huge part of politics is negotiation and bargaining. Reagan made trade-offs to get what he wanted. So did Newt. There are folks in the Democratic party who can be persuaded on various issues to help out – find them and work with them.

    “If someone offers you half a loaf, take it.” – RR

    You can ask for the other half tomorrow. – Ekosj

    Absolutely! The problem for many years has been that we seem to ask (sometimes) for half, get nothing, then give away some of what we started with.

    We all want that. A big chunk of us don’t believe that the Republican officeholders are interested. Timid, incompetent, false – this is what we’ve gotten instead since the the late 90’s.

    No argument there.    Timid, incompetent & false.   That about sums it up.    Which explains Trump.   After 20 years of T I & F the Republican electorate went looking for the guy who seemed most likely to come out of the pile laughing and licking the blood off his teeth.  [note to censors – that’s metaphorical not literal, not advocating political violence].

    He wasn’t Mohammed Ali, but he wasn’t afraid to take a punch and throw two back.   [note to censors – that’s metaphorical not literal, not advocating political violence].

    And after T I & F that was plenty enough.

    • #28
  29. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    ape2ag (View Comment):

    Don’t look now, but Tulsi Gabbard is making a play for the MAGA base. She’s outflanking jelly-spined Republicans on free speech, anti-trust, and election integrity.

    How much longer will Tulsi Gabbard be a Democrat? I know she’s not communist and I don’t think she is a full-fledged socialist and the Democrats are moving leftward.

    With the way she took down Harris – not that the rest of the Dims seemed to notice – she’s definitely in the wrong party.

    • #29
  30. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Pagodan (View Comment):
    And there are even more that have a hard time accepting any criticism of him as a person or a leader

    The reason I don’t like criticism of Trump is that that’s just about all there is.  And when someone gets dumped on for five years, I don’t want to hear any more criticism, and I will stand up for the good things he’s done.  I can’t understand people who start complimenting Trump with the caveat, Trump is gauche, vulgar, and lies a lot, and is his own worst enemy and a stain upon the Republican Party and the political process in general but!…

    I know you didn’t say all this, people do.

    • #30