Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Post ObamaCare, More Americans Uninsured

 

It was supposed to provide more security and stability to those who had health insurance.  It was supposed to provide insurance for those who didn’t have it.  And it was supposed to slow the growth of health care costs for our families, our businesses, and our government. 

At least that’s what President Obama promised ObamaCare would deliver when he speechified before a joint session of Congress in September of 2009.

But as we approach the two year anniversary of the passage of the enormously costly “Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act,” ObamaCare has proven itself a failure.  In place of security and stability, uncertainty of whether certain plans will even continue to be offered abounds.  I’ve personally received half a dozen letters from my insurer urging me to pick a new policy because ObamaCare constrains the insurer (Blue Cross) from offering the same plan to new applicants, virtually guaranteeing higher future premiums as the pool of members covered by this policy steadily shrinks. 

Instead of receiving a little relief from skyrocketing health care costs, families across America–mine and many families of Ricochet Members included–have seen their insurance premiums increase 20, 30, 40 per cent or more. 

And now, as a recent Gallup poll reveals (via CNS News), more Americans are uninsured now than before the passage of ObamaCare.

The percentage of American adults who lack health insurance coverage has not only increased during the presidency of Barack Obama, but it has continued to increase since Obama signed his signature piece of legislation last year mandating that by 2014 every American carry health insurance, according to a Gallup survey released today.

In 2008, when George W. Bush was president, according to Gallup, 14.9 percent of adult residents of the United States lacked health insurance coverage. That increased to 16.2 percent in 2009, the year that Obama was inaugurated, and to 16.4 percent in 2010, the year that Obama signed his law requiring that all Americans have health insurance.

In the first half of this year, according to data released by Gallup today, the percentage of adults in the United States lacking health insurance ticked up to 16.8 percent.

Add yet another drumbeat to the battle cry.  ObamaCare delenda est.

There are 5 comments.

  1. DocJay Inactive

    I just read an article in Internal Medicine news that was discussing the hot button topic of mandated coverage. In the AMA which is an organization of mostly specialists, the rate of agreeing to the mandate was 60 % with doctors who agree being mostly from the east and west coasts with the 40% dissenters being mostly from the south. AMA membership which really only represents a very small number of physicians has experienced a sharp decline in membership since it acquiesced to obama care only after securing no reduction of specialist payments to pay primary care more.

    Of the myriad issues wrong with this individual mandate, the largest I have is that it will fail and be massively expensive. Many will just choose the penalty, not pay it, and then activate coverage once they get ill enough. This virtually guarantees a system failure and to ready itself for these and other problems the insurance companies ramped up their assault on our pocketbooks.

    • #1
    • September 7, 2011, at 1:40 AM PDT
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  2. The (apathetic) King Prawn Inactive

    Is there a correlation between the rise of the uninsured and the increase in unemployment? With much of insurance linked to employment it would seem a valid possibility.

    • #2
    • September 7, 2011, at 1:50 AM PDT
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  3. flownover Inactive

    My letter from Blue Cross just informed me of the 58% increase . Who do I thank ?

    • #3
    • September 7, 2011, at 1:55 AM PDT
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  4. Diane Ellis Contributor
    Diane Ellis
    The King Prawn: Is there a correlation between the rise of the uninsured and the increase in unemployment? With much of insurance linked to employment it would seem a valid possibility. · Sep 6 at 1:50pm

    This seems the obvious conclusion, but strangely enough, is not even mentioned in Gallup’s analysis. This is what Gallup has to say about the phenomenon:

    States in the South and West continue to have higher numbers of uninsured adults than do those in the Northeast — consistent with what Gallup found in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Eight of the 10 states with the highest uninsured rates in the country are in the South and the other two — California and Alaska — are in the West.

    Texas, California, and Florida — all three of which have an uninsured rate higher than 20% — have disproportionately large Hispanic populations, the demographic group Gallup finds to be the most likely to be uninsured.

    • #4
    • September 7, 2011, at 2:58 AM PDT
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  5. Mark Wilson Member
    Mark Wilson Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member
    Diane Ellis, Ed.
    The King Prawn: Is there a correlation between the rise of the uninsured and the increase in unemployment? With much of insurance linked to employment it would seem a valid possibility. · Sep 6 at 1:50pm
    This seems the obvious conclusion, but strangely enough, is not even mentioned in Gallup’s analysis.

    You’re telling me a Gallup poll neglected to consider some important factors that might influence or provide insight into the results? Just when I thought I’d seen everything…

    • #5
    • September 7, 2011, at 4:42 AM PDT
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