Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Perry the Job Hunter

 

Yesterday’s Bloomberg poll delivered these numbers:

The Texas governor [Rick Perry] is the preferred choice of 26 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents in a Bloomberg National Poll conducted Sept. 9-12. Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney places second at 22 percent, while all of the other Republican candidates get less than 10 percent.

In a hypothetical general election matchup, Perry trails President Barack Obama among the poll’s entire sample, 49 percent to 40 percent, about twice the deficit for Romney. 

This, according to some, is a tough one for Perry, because:

“Perry leads in the primary contest in part because some of his most famous stands don’t turn off the primary electorate all that much,” said J. Ann Selzer, president of Des Moines, Iowa-based Selzer & Co., which conducted the poll. “In the general election, these issues will matter more.”

And that’s pretty much what the conventional wisdom is, right now, among the Obama supporters.  A Perry nominee is a fatter target.  And some establishment Republicans agree with them.

But this morning, in the Politico early morning tip sheet, Morning Money, this revealing anecdote:

Email from a well-connected Republican on Bloomberg poll numbers casting doubt on Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s general election appeal: “I’m surprised at the Bloomberg results and think they may be missing the boat on Perry. I just spent several days on the West Coast with leading tech execs and they really weren’t focused on Perry’s views on evolution or climate change. One told me a story about meeting Perry and trying to make small talk with him about hunting. The exec asked Perry what he liked to hunt and Perry responded with missing a beat ‘I hunt jobs I can bring back to Texas.’ “The focused answer resonated with the exec and everyone else who was in the room as he told the story, in sharp contrast w the annoyance tech execs feel about the slew of competitiveness destroying regulatory initiatives coming from the Administration. The fear for Obama and for Romney is that the ‘job-focused’ Perry is the one that the public comes to know and like in the next few months.”

A jobs-focused candidate will be a powerful opponent.  Do you think that the 9.2% of all Americans who are looking for work are going to be voting on evolution?  Or climate change?  

There are 14 comments.

  1. Cas Balicki Inactive

    They’ll vote for climate change in the Oval office.

    • #1
    • September 16, 2011, at 10:37 AM PST
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  2. Michael Tee Inactive

    Not for nothing, but I’m kind of tired of the horse race articles. The theme for this week has been amongst the Establishment cocktail party types is “I hope Perry isn’t the nominee, he doesn’t have the witty repartee of Romney,” as if Romney can say something that hasn’t been programmed in by Dr. Ratton from KAOS.

    • #2
    • September 16, 2011, at 10:40 AM PST
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  3. flownover Inactive

    That 9.2 % is just what the LA Times will fess up to. Let’s put in the underemployed and those who have quit looking and the number starts to creep towards 20% . Plenty of time on their hands to go to the polls that day or, better yet, work on someone’s campaign in the runup.

    And 6% of the private sector is union ? Just 6% .

    Do you think that Mitt promised his dad that he would be president when his dad failed ? Is there a subplot here ( or in the GOP ) ?

    • #3
    • September 16, 2011, at 11:15 AM PST
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  4. Western Chauvinist Member

    It really comes down to offering a conservative choice, not progressive-lite. The voters, given the choice between Obama and the candidate of Obamneycare, tend to prefer Obama Original. Romney’s arguments in favor of saving social security just turn my stomach. He’s not arguing for smaller government. He’s making the case for himself as zookeeper for Leviathan.

    Members of the media and their polls always tell us we can’t win with a true conservative, when the truth is, we can’t win with an inauthentic counterfeit of the devil we know.

    • #4
    • September 16, 2011, at 11:46 AM PST
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  5. Liver Pate Inactive

    In a race between a fox and a hedgehog, put my money on the hedgehog. And Michelle Bachmann may have given Perry an unwitting gift by being able to position himself as the “pro science” candidate after she tried to desperately outflank him.

    • #5
    • September 16, 2011, at 11:58 AM PST
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  6. Liver Pate Inactive

    “In this race we’re not nominating the best statesman; we’re nominating the best poker player”

    Pseudodionysius

    • #6
    • September 16, 2011, at 11:59 AM PST
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  7. dittoheadadt Inactive

    Yes, they’ll be voting on evolution and climate change.

    They don’t want to become extinct, and they want a healthy economic climate for a change.

    • #7
    • September 17, 2011, at 1:52 AM PST
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  8. Paul A. Rahe Contributor

    It would be interesting to know the partisan makeup of the Bloomberg sample. With the right partisan break-down, you can get the results you want.

    • #8
    • September 17, 2011, at 3:16 AM PST
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  9. Liver Pate Inactive

    But more and more I think this election is going to be about the forest. And it’s a big forest.

    If a free tree fell in the forest, would anyone pay to hear it?

    • #9
    • September 17, 2011, at 3:49 AM PST
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  10. Rob Long Founder
    Rob Long Post author
    Cas Balicki: They’ll vote for climate change in the Oval office. · Sep 16 at 10:37am

    Nicely put!

    • #10
    • September 17, 2011, at 4:11 AM PST
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  11. Rob Long Founder
    Rob Long Post author
    Cutlass: “Do you think that the 9.2% of all Americans who are looking for work are going to be voting on evolution? Or climate change?”

    Excellent point. You can also add Mormonism and migraines to that list.

    It’s so easy to get caught up in all this nonsense when you’re immersed in politics. Any normal person will surely find it absurd next year when our candidate is talking about the economy, entitlement reform and Obama’s miserable record while the leftist media make the case for Obama with childish jokes about Perry’s rain dances or Romney’s ‘magic underwear.’ · Sep 16 at 12:40pm

    I agree. There’s a forest-for-the-trees thing going on here. Lefty and Dems desperately want the election to be about the trees. But more and more I think this election is going to be about the forest. And it’s a big forest.

    • #11
    • September 17, 2011, at 4:14 AM PST
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  12. John Marzan Inactive
    Paul A. Rahe: It would be interesting to know the partisan makeup of the Bloomberg sample. With the right partisan break-down, you can get the results you want. · Sep 16 at 3:16pm

    Rasmussen: Obama 46%, Perry 39% (Sept 15, 2011)

    • #12
    • September 17, 2011, at 7:16 AM PST
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  13. The Mugwump Inactive

    Let’s see here . . . Dems lost 62 seats in the mid-term. Lost Ted Kennedy’s seat a few months after that in a special election. Lost a seat they held for 75 years in NY-9. But, but, but, Obama will beat Perry by nine percent! This isn’t a leap of faith; it’s a leap down the rabbit hole.

    • #13
    • September 17, 2011, at 12:28 PM PST
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  14. Cutlass Inactive

    “Do you think that the 9.2% of all Americans who are looking for work are going to be voting on evolution? Or climate change?”

    Excellent point. You can also add Mormonism and migraines to that list.

    It’s so easy to get caught up in all this nonsense when you’re immersed in politics. Any normal person will surely find it absurd next year when our candidate is talking about the economy, entitlement reform and Obama’s miserable record while the leftist media make the case for Obama with childish jokes about Perry’s rain dances or Romney’s ‘magic underwear.’

    • #14
    • September 17, 2011, at 12:40 PM PST
    • Like