Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Thanks for the Marines

 

245 years ago, on November 10, 1775, The Continental Congress authorized the creation of two battalions of Marines. The Marines were disbanded, along with the navy, after victory in the American Revolution, and re-established on 11 July 1798. So, for a century July 11 was celebrated as the Marine Corps birthday. The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

The brief Continental Congress journal entry for the day reflected a serious group of legislators, of a sort we sorely need in these days. The day’s business was all about military preparations at the strategic level. The marine battalions were part of that preparation, creating needed force structure long before we formally declared independence. The members of Congress understood that there was not time to train from ground zero, so required “no persons be appointed to office, or insisted into said battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required.”

A year later, the Continental Congress had a Marine Committee, which published regulations, including a uniform regulation distinguishing the Continental Marine battalions from the Continental Army with its blue coats:

Green coats with white facings (lapels, cuffs, and coat lining), and a black leather high collar to protect against cutlass slashes and to keep a man’s head erect.

It is thought that the green color was selected as it was plentiful in Philadelphia, and it served to distinguish Marines from the Blue coats of the Continental Army and Navy. Also, Sam Nicholas’s hunting club wore green uniforms and hence his recommendation to the committee was for green.

Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1775

[Finance]

On motion made, Resolved, That an order be drawn on the treasurers for 1000 dollars, in favour of Mr. R[obert] R. Livingston, Mr. [Robert Treat] Paine, and Mr. [John] Langdon, the Committee appointed to repair to the northward,

[Supply and transportation]

On motion made, Resolved, That the goods bought for the northern army be sent by land to Dobb’s ferry, and that the president write to the convention of New York, and desire them to have a vessel ready to take in the said goods, and transport them immediately to Albany.

[Medical supplies]

Resolved, That the medicines purchased in this city for the army at Cambridge, be sent thither by land.

Resolved, That the president give written orders to Dr. [John] Morgan, to call upon Mr. [Isaac] Sears, and desire him to deliver what medicines he has under his care, or can procure, that they may be forwarded to the camp at Cambridge, for the use of the continental army.1

[Note 1: 1 Against this paragraph in the “Corrected Journals” is written the word “Secret.”]

[Logistics estimates, planning]

On motion made, Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to enquire into the state of the colony of Virginia, to consider whether any, and what provisions may be necessary for its defence, and to report the same to the Congress.

That the committee consist of five.

The members chosen, Mr. S[amuel] Adams, Mr. [Thomas] Lynch, Mr. [James] Wilson, Mr. [Samuel] Ward, and Mr. [Thomas] Johnson.

[Postal operations]

Resolved, That all letters to and from the commander in chief in the continental army, or the chief commander in the army in the northern department, pass and be carried free of postage.

[Operations, strategic maneuver]

Resolved, That the commander of the New Jersey battalions be directed to march six companies of said battalions, as soon as they are completed, to garrison the fort on Hudson’s river, in the highlands, in the Colony of New York.

[Ammunition]

Resolved, That the president write to Governor Cooke, and request him to send to the Committee of Safety of New York, one ton of powder, for the defence of that City and Colony.

[Perhaps communications costs.]

Resolved, That there be paid to John Wendall, the express from Albany, who has been detained several ∥twelve∥ days by order of the Congress, the sum of 1 1/3 dollars per day ∥sixteen dollars,∥ for the time he has been so detained.

[Finance]

Resolved, That an order be drawn on the treasurers in favor of the delegates of New Jersey, for the sum of 5000 dollars, for the use of the battalions ∥ordered to be raised in that colony.

Ordered, That the delegates of Pennsylvania do call on the gentlemen appointed to sign the continental bills, and request them with all possible expedition to compleat that business.

[Strategic logistics, industrial base: making gun powder]

The Committee appointed to consider farther ways and means of promoting the manufacture of salt petre, brought in their report, which was read in these words:

It appears to your Committee, that skilful persons sent to Virginia, and employed there in a public salt petre work, under the inspection of gentlemen who will superintend it, may, with sufficient assistance, produce a considerable quantity of that article; and that a farther supply of it may be procured from the other colonies, if the assemblies, conventions, and councils of safety will appoint proper persons in their respective colonies, whose business it shall be to employ and set to work such and so many of their countrymen, as they shall judge fit, to collect earth from which nitrous salt may be extracted, and to manufacture it into salt petre.

The Congress taking into consideration the said report,

Resolved, That Richard Bland, Peter Poythress, John Bunnister, John Buffin, Archibald Cary, Benjamin Watkins, John Tabb, Richard Adams, Richard Randolph, and Theodorick Bland, the younger, Esquires, or any five or more of them, be desired and empowered to agree with the proprietors of the public warehouses, and of other places impregnated with nitre, in the counties of Prince George, Dinwiddie, Chesterfield, and Henrico; Carter Braxton, John Syme, Burwell Basset, Bartholomew Dandridge, William Aylett, George Brook, George Lyne, and George Webb, Esquires, or any five or more of them, with such proprietors in the counties of Hanover, New Kent, King William, and King and Queen; Edmund Pendleton, James Taylor, George Stubblefield, Mann Page, the younger, Joseph Jones, William Fitzhugh, of Somerset, and Fielding Lewis, Esquires, or any four or more of them, with such proprietors in the counties of Caroline, Spotsylvania, and King George; and Charles Carter, of Stafford, Thomas Ludwell Lee, Henry Lee, Thomas Blackburn, Charles Broadwater, and George Mason, Esquires, or any three or more of them, with such proprietors in the county of Stafford, Prince William, and Fairfax, in the colony of Virginia, to purchase for the use of the United Colonies, all the salt petre which may within twelve calendar months be produced from the floors and yards of the warehouses and other places, under the management of such persons as the Congress shall appoint for that purpose, and to pay to the owners of the soil, if they will manufacture it at their own expence, after the rate of two fifth parts of a dollar for every pound weight, avoirdupois, of clean, pure, and neat salt petre, delivered to the gentlemen above named, for the use of the United Colonies, and to hire labourers, and provide the necessary apparatus, to be employed under the direction of the said Managers, in the soil of such persons as shall not chuse to adventure in the business themselves, paying to the owners, if they require satisfaction, what they shall be willing to take, so that it do not exceed one forty-fifth part of a dollar for every pound weight, avoirdupois, of salt petre of the like quality, in both which cases the Congress will make good the contracts, and will pay all such expenses as shall be incurred by the gentlemen desired to superintend the operation; on whose zeal, influence, and abilities, to procure, with all convenient expedition, a large quantity of this article, so necessary for the defence of their country, and thereby render it a very important service, and by their example and activity to forward and encourage this useful work, the Congress rely with confidence.

Resolved, That it be recommended to the Assemblies, Conventions, and committees of Safety, of the thirteen United Colonies, to appoint certain persons within each of the said colonies, whose business it shall be to employ and set to work so many persons as they may think proper, both to work up such earth as is now fit for making salt petre, and to collect together and place in beds or walls under sheds, all such earth and composition of materials as are suitable to produce salt petre, after being duly exposed to the air, in order to encrease the produce of it, and that the delegates of the respective colonies be directed to send this resolve, together with the resolve of last session respecting salt petre, to their respective colonies, and cause them to be printed and made public there.

[Strategic intelligence, seeking to add or neutralize Nova Scotia.]

The Congress resuming the consideration of the report of the Committee on Nova Scotia,1

Resolved, That two persons be sent at the expence of these colonies to Nova Scotia to enquire into the state of that colony, the disposition of the inhabitants towards the American cause and the condition of the fortifications, Docks, yards, the quantity of artillery and warlike stores and the number of soldiers, sailors and ships of war there and transmit the earliest intelligence to General Washington.1

Resolved, That General Washington be directed in case he should judge it practicable and expedient to send into that colony a sufficient force to take away the cannon and warlike stores and to destroy the docks, yards and magazines, and to take or destroy any ships of war and transports there belonging to the enemy.1

[Force Structure: adding a war-fighting capability to ships.]

Resolved, That two Battalions of marines be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other officers as usual in other regiments; and that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken, that no persons be appointed to office, or insisted into said battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required: that they be insisted and commissioned to serve for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by order of Congress: that they be distinguished by the names of the first and second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered as part of the number which the continental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of.1

Ordered, That a copy of the above be transmitted to the General.

Resolved, That to Morrow be assigned for taking into consideration the Report of the Committee on the disputes between the people of Connecticut and Pensylvania on the waters of Susquehannah.

The order of the day renewed,

Adjourned to ten o’Clock to Morrow.

[Note 1: 1 Against these paragraphs in the “Corrected Journals” is written the word “Secret.”]

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  1. Boss Mongo Member

    Man, love me some Devil Dogs. Just keep the crayons away from them. They think those’er hors d’oeuvres.

    • #1
    • November 10, 2020, at 9:04 PM PST
    • 12 likes
  2. JennaStocker Member

    Boss Mongo (View Comment):

    Man, love me some Devil Dogs. Just keep the crayons away from them. They think those’er hors d’oeuvres.

    Hey, don’t knock it ‘til you’ve tried it.

    • #2
    • November 10, 2020, at 9:35 PM PST
    • 6 likes
  3. Annefy Member

    Happy Birthday USMC. I already gave you my present. 

     

    • #3
    • November 10, 2020, at 9:37 PM PST
    • 12 likes
  4. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown

    This is a bonus post in our Group Writing Series under the November 2020 Group Writing Theme: “Cornucopia of Thanks.” Ricochet will thank you for signing up, thus avoiding disco and bears.

    Interested in Group Writing topics that came before? See the handy compendium of monthly themes. Check out links in the Group Writing Group. You can also join the group to get a notification when a new monthly theme is posted.

    • #4
    • November 10, 2020, at 9:56 PM PST
    • 1 like
  5. Boss Mongo Member

    JennaStocker (View Comment):

    Boss Mongo (View Comment):

    Man, love me some Devil Dogs. Just keep the crayons away from them. They think those’er hors d’oeuvres.

    Hey, don’t knock it ‘til you’ve tried it.

    I have. With Devil Dogs. Not bad if you’ve got a smooth-finishing mescal to hand.

    • #5
    • November 10, 2020, at 10:00 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  6. colleenb Member
    colleenb Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Boss Mongo (View Comment):

    JennaStocker (View Comment):

    Boss Mongo (View Comment):

    Man, love me some Devil Dogs. Just keep the crayons away from them. They think those’er hors d’oeuvres.

    Hey, don’t knock it ‘til you’ve tried it.

    I have. With Devil Dogs. Not bad if you’ve got a smooth-finishing mescal to hand.

    Boss I keep meaning to tell you that I’m sorry that Derrick VO did not win his House seat. I so appreciate anyone who puts it out there and runs for office. God bless him. (I hope I have the name right.)

    • #6
    • November 11, 2020, at 4:12 AM PST
    • 1 like
  7. Susan Quinn Contributor

    Thanks, Clifford. We can never honor our military enough. Thank G-d for their/your service.

    • #7
    • November 11, 2020, at 5:54 AM PST
    • 4 likes
  8. Sweezle Member

    Clifford you always have amazed me. Thanks for enriching Ricochet and increasing my knowledge of historical events. 

    • #8
    • November 11, 2020, at 4:15 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  9. PappyJim Coolidge

    Thanks for the history. Semper Fidelis.

    • #9
    • November 11, 2020, at 6:09 PM PST
    • 1 like
  10. Cow Girl Thatcher

    Annefy (View Comment):

    Happy Birthday USMC. I already gave you my present.

     

    Those are some terrific looking sons there! Any Proud Mother strutting that you do is totally deserved!!

    • #10
    • November 11, 2020, at 6:20 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  11. Cow Girl Thatcher

    Mr. CowGirl served in the Navy for quite a long time, and when he was a civilian he worked with the Marines. I’ve already talked about this, but 30 years ago, when he was going to Saudi Arabia with those Marines to be their technical support wizard with the [then unknown] unmanned air vehicle Pioneer, I was concerned. “You can’t have a gun! You’re a civilian!”

    He casually replied, “I don’t need a gun. I have something better. I have 50 Marines with guns. Don’t worry.” 

    • #11
    • November 11, 2020, at 6:27 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  12. Skyler Coolidge

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    • #12
    • November 11, 2020, at 6:41 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  13. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    Well, there is that. Note how the National Guard points back much further now, crowning itself the eldest by far.

    We recognize December 13th as the birthday of the National Guard. On this date in 1636, the first militia regiments in North America were organized in Massachusetts. Based upon an order of the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s General Court, the colony’s militia was organized into three permanent regiments to better defend the colony. Today, the descendants of these first regiments – the 181st Infantry, the 182nd Infantry, the 101st Field Artillery, and the 101st Engineer Battalion of the Massachusetts Army National Guard – share the distinction of being the oldest units in the U.S. military. December 13, 1636, thus marks the beginning of the organized militia, and the birth of the National Guard’s oldest organized units is symbolic of the founding of all the state, territory, and District of Columbia militias that collectively make up today’s National Guard.[emphasis added]

    Of course, the November 10, 1775 date is after both the Army and the Navy, going by the Journals of the Continental Congress:

    On 14 June 1775, Congress “Resolved, That six companies of expert riflemen, be immediately raised in Pennsylvania, two in Maryland, and two in Virginia… [and] as soon as completed, shall march and join the army near Boston, to be there employed as light infantry, under the command of the chief Officer in that army.”

    The delegates then prescribed an oath of enlistment that required the soldiers to swear:

    “I have, this day, voluntarily enlisted myself, as a soldier, in the American continental army, for one year, unless sooner discharged: And I do bind myself to conform, in all instances, to such rules and regulations, as are, or shall be, established for the government of the said. Army.”

    The next day Congress voted to appoint George Washington “to command all the Continental forces” and began laying the foundation for “the American army.”

    The Navy can point to:

    A 13 October 1775 resolution of the Continental Congress established what is now the United States Navy with “a swift sailing vessel, to carry ten carriage guns, and a proportionable number of swivels, with eighty men, be fitted, with all possible despatch, for a cruise of three months….” After the American War of Independence, the U.S. Constitution empowered the new Congress “to provide and maintain a navy.” Acting on this authority, Congress established the Department of the Navy on 30 April 1798.

    As you point out, however, the Navy was not nearly so swift to claim elder rights:

    In 1972, Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt authorized official recognition of 13 October as the birthday of the U.S. Navy. Since then, each CNO has encouraged a Navy-wide celebration of this occasion “to enhance a greater appreciation of our Navy heritage, and to provide a positive influence toward pride and professionalism in the naval service.”

    I have not found evidence that the Army earlier celebrated September 29, 1789 as the date on which the first Congress under the Constitution made the Army all legal, passing an act to regularize the forces last authorized, more or less, under the Continental Congress.

    • #13
    • November 11, 2020, at 9:37 PM PST
    • 1 like
    • This comment has been edited.
  14. PappyJim Coolidge

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    IIRC the honor of being to the right and head of the line on parade was a recognition of the valor shown by Marines during the period from the end of our civil war and WW I. I’ll need to look that up.

    • #14
    • November 12, 2020, at 7:52 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  15. Boss Mongo Member

    Actually, the first unit in any military parade is, by precedence, The United States Corps of Cadets from the United States Military Academy. I think that fact can be found in Bugle Notes*

    Of course, that may have just been West Point propaganda. Bastards.

    *I’ll come back and edit this comment by inserting a link when I can get on Amazon. Our servers are batting at about .500 on NIPR net websites today.

    • #15
    • November 12, 2020, at 8:19 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  16. Skyler Coolidge

    PappyJim (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    IIRC the honor of being to the right and head of the line on parade was a recognition of the valor shown by Marines during the period from the end of our civil war and WW I. I’ll need to look that up.

    Honestly, the Marines were almost a nonentity before WWI. They were considered an unruly and ill disciplined mob by the army in most engagements, such as in Mexico.

    • #16
    • November 12, 2020, at 8:45 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  17. colleenb Member
    colleenb Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Skyler (View Comment):

    PappyJim (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    IIRC the honor of being to the right and head of the line on parade was a recognition of the valor shown by Marines during the period from the end of our civil war and WW I. I’ll need to look that up.

    Honestly, the Marines were almost a nonentity before WWI. They were considered an unruly and ill disciplined mob by the army in most engagements, such as in Mexico.

    It’s so interesting to go to the USMC museum in Quantico and see how small the USMC was but how often they showed up in strategic times and places: capturing John Brown, Tripoli, Latin America at various times. 

    • #17
    • November 12, 2020, at 9:35 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  18. Skyler Coolidge

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    PappyJim (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    IIRC the honor of being to the right and head of the line on parade was a recognition of the valor shown by Marines during the period from the end of our civil war and WW I. I’ll need to look that up.

    Honestly, the Marines were almost a nonentity before WWI. They were considered an unruly and ill disciplined mob by the army in most engagements, such as in Mexico.

    It’s so interesting to go to the USMC museum in Quantico and see how small the USMC was but how often they showed up in strategic times and places: capturing John Brown, Tripoli, Latin America at various times.

    The original purpose of the Royal Marines, the model for the USMC, was primarily to protect the captain and officers from their shanghaied crew. Manning a gun or acting as sharpshooters in battle was almost a side purpose. The US Navy didn’t rely as much on kidnapped crew, but the Marines’ purpose was essentially the same. It wasn’t until WWI that they were much more than that.

    • #18
    • November 12, 2020, at 10:53 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  19. PappyJim Coolidge

    Skyler (View Comment):

    PappyJim (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    IIRC the honor of being to the right and head of the line on parade was a recognition of the valor shown by Marines during the period from the end of our civil war and WW I. I’ll need to look that up.

    Honestly, the Marines were almost a nonentity before WWI. They were considered an unruly and ill disciplined mob by the army in most engagements, such as in Mexico.

    The Army is always saying that. It covers for how slowly they operate. Marine tactical jingle/mnemonic device for infantry officers: (n.b. maneuver elements are usually constructed of three smaller elements from rifle squads through rifle battalions) “Two Up; One Back – Hey Diddle-diddle straight up the middle.” For a platoon that’s two squads in the attack one left as reserve and go get them without engaging in Army style waiting for lots of arty/air and trying for flanking envelopment on a large scale. BUT it’s now One Fight/One Team. At least as long as the appropriations hold out. If they run short it’s get rid of the Corps. ;-)

    But, I was referring to Navy formations. Did some research at University of the Marine Corps and they only addressed the precedence of multi-service formations vice naval formations and it’s guessed at that the services are arranged by seniority by date of “founding.”

    • #19
    • November 12, 2020, at 5:57 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  20. PappyJim Coolidge

    Skyler (View Comment):

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    PappyJim (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):

    Clifford A. Brown: The earlier date was adopted as the official birthday in 1923, placing the Marines properly in the context of our fight for independence.

    Honestly, that was just interservice rivalry allowing the Marines to claim for quite some time to be “older” than the other services and thus have seniority in parades and such. Or so I was taught.

    IIRC the honor of being to the right and head of the line on parade was a recognition of the valor shown by Marines during the period from the end of our civil war and WW I. I’ll need to look that up.

    Honestly, the Marines were almost a nonentity before WWI. They were considered an unruly and ill disciplined mob by the army in most engagements, such as in Mexico.

    It’s so interesting to go to the USMC museum in Quantico and see how small the USMC was but how often they showed up in strategic times and places: capturing John Brown, Tripoli, Latin America at various times.

    The original purpose of the Royal Marines, the model for the USMC, was primarily to protect the captain and officers from their shanghaied crew. Manning a gun or acting as sharpshooters in battle was almost a side purpose. The US Navy didn’t rely as much on kidnapped crew, but the Marines’ purpose was essentially the same. It wasn’t until WWI that they were much more than that.

    One of the Navy’s experiments of doing away with Marines on ship ended with a Midshipman being hanged for leading a mutiny. That middie was a son of the current serving Sec of War. I think it was Adm. David Porter who said “a ship w/o Marines was like a coat w/o buttons. ”

    • #20
    • November 12, 2020, at 6:03 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  21. Boss Mongo Member

    Alright, so you can read all the stuff in Bugle Notes here; parade precedence is not in it, but I seem to remember it being in my hardcopy version (in one of my two storage sites, somewhere). You can read parade precedence here.

    You’re more than welcome to shoot holes in it. My apathy about who marches first in any given parade knows no bounds.

    My initial impulse was to put up a bunch of stuff about/from/around the Bugle notes, and its impact on me. I don’t think any Devil Dog anywhere would look askance or take umbrage at what’s in there. But, this post is about the USMC, about our beloved Devil Dogs, our beloved Leathernecks, our beloved Gyrenes who would (and have) crawl through and over their own guts to accomplish the mission. So God Bless you, USMC.

     

    • #21
    • November 12, 2020, at 6:18 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  22. Boss Mongo Member

    PappyJim (View Comment):
    The Army is always saying that. It covers for how slowly they operate. Marine tactical jingle/mnemonic device for infantry officers: (n.b. maneuver elements are usually constructed of three smaller elements from rifle squads through rifle battalions) “Two Up; One Back – Hey Diddle-diddle straight up the middle.” For a platoon that’s two squads in the attack one left as reserve and go get them without engaging in Army style waiting for lots of arty/air and trying for flanking envelopment on a large scale. BUT it’s now One Fight/One Team. At least as long as the appropriations hold out. If they run short it’s get rid of the Corps. ;-)

    @pappyjim, I shall not even engage this slander, as the whole point of the OP is to laud the MC. So to sum up: wrong, wrong, wrong.

    • #22
    • November 12, 2020, at 6:31 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  23. PappyJim Coolidge

    Boss Mongo (View Comment):

    PappyJim (View Comment):
    The Army is always saying that. It covers for how slowly they operate. Marine tactical jingle/mnemonic device for infantry officers: (n.b. maneuver elements are usually constructed of three smaller elements from rifle squads through rifle battalions) “Two Up; One Back – Hey Diddle-diddle straight up the middle.” For a platoon that’s two squads in the attack one left as reserve and go get them without engaging in Army style waiting for lots of arty/air and trying for flanking envelopment on a large scale. BUT it’s now One Fight/One Team. At least as long as the appropriations hold out. If they run short it’s get rid of the Corps. ;-)

    @pappyjim, I shall not even engage this slander, as the whole point of the OP is to laud the MC. So to sum up: wrong, wrong, wrong.

    Uh, brother Boss, I can delete anything you point to as slander. It is not my intent to cause heart burn. I’m speaking from fifty year memories recounted, hopefully, with bon hommie (sp?).

    • #23
    • November 12, 2020, at 7:50 PM PST
    • 1 like
  24. PappyJim Coolidge

    This is an example of the never ending anti-USMC arguments which surface from time to time:

    https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/11/12/new-dod-adviser-has-made-controversial-proposal-get-rid-of-marine-corps.html?fbclid=IwAR00YL-bi0YYVU0laiR69A6vpSvlL60e-oxWJhHDYO0dVI37WF8ZCagB0Lg

    • #24
    • November 13, 2020, at 4:20 AM PST
    • 3 likes
  25. Boss Mongo Member

    PappyJim (View Comment):
    This is an example of the never ending anti-USMC arguments which surface from time to time

    Yeah. Screw that.

    • #25
    • November 13, 2020, at 7:38 AM PST
    • 3 likes