Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Biden Whopper of the Night: ‘Not One Single Person Lost Private Insurance under Obamacare’

 

I expected lies from Biden Thursday night. The guy’s whole career is a fiction. But the line about no one losing their private health insurance was, to me, the whopper of the night. My lovely bride and I lost our private health insurance under Obamacare. So did millions of others.

If you recall, Obamacare regulations required that all insurance policies provide at least a fixed set of coverages. Those included maternity care and pediatric vision and dental care. Surprisingly, as people over 55 with grown children who had their own insurance, our plan did not offer maternity or pediatric coverage. But for the things we needed it offered excellent coverage. No matter, our plan was cancelled.

From Ballotpedia:

  • NBC News reported that between 50 percent and 75 percent of the 14 million who buy individual health insurance would likely receive a cancellation notice over 2014 because their plans did not meet the requirements of the ACA.
  • CBS News reported that more than two million Americans were told they could not renew their insurance policies for 2014.
  • According to NBC News, the Obama administration knew in July 2010 that more than 40 percent to 67 percent of people in the individual market would likely not be able to keep their existing policies.
  • Health policy consultant Robert Laszewski estimated 80 percent of individual insurance buyers would have to find new policies.

In fact, in November 2013, Obama issued an apology to those who lost their health insurance to Obamacare regulations.

The insurance we bought to replace our old plan cost more and covered less of what we actually needed but, by God, if the miracle birth ever happened we’d have maternity care.

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  1. Kozak Member
    KozakJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    How many here had their insurance policies change to where they had enormous deductibles and massive increase in premium costs? Does Biden think people don’t remember that?

     

     

    • #1
    • October 23, 2020, at 4:53 AM PDT
    • 13 likes
  2. EODmom Coolidge

    Kozak (View Comment):

    How many here had their insurance policies change to where they had enormous deductibles and massive increase in premium costs? Does Biden think people don’t remember that?

     

     

    He doesn’t care. 

    • #2
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:06 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  3. Vance Richards Member
    Vance RichardsJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Ekosj: CBS News reported that more than two million Americans were told they could not renew their insurance policies for 2014

    One of my best friends had that happen to him. He had been buying his own insurance for years and then after Obamacare went into effect the insurance company told him they could no longer offer him coverage but that he might qualify for expanded Medicaid. So someone who could afford to pay his own way was told to move to a government subsidized plan.

    Kozak (View Comment):

    How many here had their insurance policies change to where they had enormous deductibles and massive increase in premium costs? Does Biden think people don’t remember that?

    Yup. It costs more but it covers less.

    • #3
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:07 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  4. MBF Member
    MBFJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I was particularly enraged by that comment. A company that I interned for in 2005 was put out of business by the ACA. They sold individual health policies that were specially tailored to consumer needs, which is now illegal. All of a sudden 1,200 employees and a significant corporate presence in Milwaukee are crushed by Washington regulations. Not to mention the tens of thousands of policy holders that lost their coverage.

    • #4
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:18 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  5. MarciN Member

    According to the Census Bureau, as of 2018:

    In 2018, 8.5 percent of people, or 27.5 million, did not have health insurance at any point during the year. The uninsured rate and number of uninsured increased from 2017 (7.9 percent or 25.6 million).

    That is really shocking given the cost of the legislation and the promises made. 

    I can’t imagine this country putting back in office the Obama-Biden team. From what I can tell, the ObamaCare debacle served only to employ some very expensive and incompetent computer programmers and a whole lot of useless incompetent bureaucrats. 

     

    • #5
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:21 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  6. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj

    Kozak (View Comment):

    How many here had their insurance policies change to where they had enormous deductibles and massive increase in premium costs? Does Biden think people don’t remember that?

     

     

    He sure as hell hopes not!

    • #6
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:22 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  7. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj

    MBF (View Comment):

    I was particularly enraged by that comment. A company that I interned for in 2005 was put out of business by the ACA. They sold individual health policies that were specially tailored to consumer needs, which is now illegal. All of a sudden 1,200 employees and a significant corporate presence in Milwaukee are crushed by Washington regulations. Not to mention the tens of thousands of policy holders that lost their coverage.

    Obamacare made millions worse off than they were before. But the Left has the blinders on where ‘free healthcare’ is concerned. In their headlong rush to save the world they don’t care who they trample.

    • #7
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:33 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  8. Stad Thatcher

    Ekosj: I expected lies from Biden last night. The guy’s whole career is a fiction. But the line about no one losing their private health insurance was, to me, the whopper of the night. My lovely bride and I lost our private health insurance under Obamacare. So did millions of others.

    Yet lots of these people will still vote for candidates with a D in front of their name . . .

    • #8
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:44 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  9. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western ChauvinistJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    When you get so used to lying and no one ever holds you to account (MSM), you come to believe your own lies. That’s Democrats in a nutshell. The media is aiding and abetting them becoming awful people. 

    • #9
    • October 23, 2020, at 6:12 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  10. Front Seat Cat Member

    This was and is a big issue – very big. Everything changed under Obamacare, and not for the better. Yes – healthy 20 year olds could get cheap healthcare, but many chose not to and still had to pay the mandate. The older people who need more check ups and good healthcare had un-affordable premiums and less care. Both doctors and healthcare workers told me it was a nightmare to file, and juggle. My sister in law, a home healthcare nurse, saw her coverage plummet and get more expensive! Small businesses could not afford to cover under the new requirements, and let some positions go.

    The amount of money, tons of lawyers and horse manure that it took to wreck an already good system that could have been improved as is (I agree with the pre-existing conditions coverage part was good) could have gone into improvements, health savings accounts, and forcing more competition.

    BidenCare????

    • #10
    • October 23, 2020, at 6:16 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  11. DrewInWisconsin, Man of Consta… Coolidge

    The only way to bring the costs of healthcare down is to keep the government from subsidizing so much of it. Removing all those ridiculous government-mandated insurance requirements will bring the cost of insurance down, but you still have to get rid of so much subsidizing.

    Nobody’s gonna have the political will to do that.

    Biden’s lie about bringing competition to the health insurance industry by offering a public option is silly. If we’re talking about a public/private partnership with insurance companies (as with Obamacare) then all he’s doing is picking a few insurance companies and giving them instant customers. That’s the opposite of competition.

    If it’s a form of “medicare for all,” that’s how you put insurance companies out of business while increasing taxes 1000 percent.

    We really need free market healthcare, not this chimera of a system.

    • #11
    • October 23, 2020, at 6:32 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  12. DrewInWisconsin, Man of Consta… Coolidge

    And I swear Biden mumbled something about getting rid of private insurance. But it was one of those cases where he mumbled the inconvenient thing quickly, and then spoke the next sentence clearly so as to distract. (He does that a lot.)

    • #12
    • October 23, 2020, at 6:34 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  13. Sisyphus Coolidge
    SisyphusJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    My costs went through the roof. It was a nightmare. My insurance costs almost doubled in one year. Which was no surprise since the whole point was to drive the narrative into universal health care.

    • #13
    • October 23, 2020, at 6:35 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  14. Susan in Seattle Member
    Susan in SeattleJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I’m self-employed. I lost my health insurance and the doctor I liked under the ‘ACA.’

    • #14
    • October 23, 2020, at 6:39 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  15. James Gawron Thatcher
    James GawronJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Ekosj,

    Nobody lies like a Democrat. Biden has been caught so many times telling bald-faced lies that it gets boring. Biden is a duel threat. He’s both a creep and a jerk.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #15
    • October 23, 2020, at 6:53 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  16. Buckpasser Member
    BuckpasserJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Take health care away from your job. Pay for your own things like oil changes (I mean regular check ups). Keep big brother out of it.

    • #16
    • October 23, 2020, at 7:25 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  17. Buckpasser Member
    BuckpasserJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I forgot to end the above with “If you like your plan you can keep your plan” and “If you like your doctor you can keep your doctor”.

    • #17
    • October 23, 2020, at 7:45 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  18. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj

    DrewInWisconsin, Man of Consta… (View Comment):

    The only way to bring the costs of healthcare down is to keep the government from subsidizing so much of it. Removing all those ridiculous government-mandated insurance requirements will bring the cost of insurance down, but you still have to get rid of so much subsidizing.

    Nobody’s gonna have the political will to do that.

    Biden’s lie about bringing competition to the health insurance industry by offering a public option is silly. If we’re talking about a public/private partnership with insurance companies (as with Obamacare) then all he’s doing is picking a few insurance companies and giving them instant customers. That’s the opposite of competition.

    If it’s a form of “medicare for all,” that’s how you put insurance companies out of business while increasing taxes 1000 percent.

    We really need free market healthcare, not this chimera of a system.

    I’m old enough to remember how health insurance used to work …

    You’d go to the Dr.

    You’d get a bill.
    You’d pay the bill.

    You’d submit all that to the insurance company and they’d reimburse you.

    Or, if the bill was large, you’d submit the bill to the insurance company and they’d make a remittance to the Dr. who’d send you an amended bill. You’d pay that.

    Either way, price was up front and part of the discussion. Just like everything else in a market economy.

    Somewhere in the 1980’s, the insurance companies finagled themselves in between the Dr and patient. For everyone’s convenience of course. Now, neither the Dr not the patient really knows what things cost. How can you garner all the benefits and efficiencies of free markets when neither the buyer nor the seller know what the product costs? 

    Image going to the supermarket and all the shelves are stocked with sealed plain brown paper bags labeled FOOD. What’s inside? Rice and beans? Steaks and lobsters? You don’t know. How much does one cost? You don’t know that either. Pick one or two out and go home … the market will bill your credit card later. That’s more or less the current system.

    • #18
    • October 23, 2020, at 8:19 AM PDT
    • 7 likes
  19. Bishop Wash Member

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Man of Consta… (View Comment):

    The only way to bring the costs of healthcare down is to keep the government from subsidizing so much of it. Removing all those ridiculous government-mandated insurance requirements will bring the cost of insurance down, but you still have to get rid of so much subsidizing.

    Nobody’s gonna have the political will to do that.

    Biden’s lie about bringing competition to the health insurance industry by offering a public option is silly. If we’re talking about a public/private partnership with insurance companies (as with Obamacare) then all he’s doing is picking a few insurance companies and giving them instant customers. That’s the opposite of competition.

    If it’s a form of “medicare for all,” that’s how you put insurance companies out of business while increasing taxes 1000 percent.

    We really need free market healthcare, not this chimera of a system.

    I’m old enough to remember how health insurance used to work …

    You’d go to the Dr.

    You’d get a bill.
    You’d pay the bill.

    You’d submit all that to the insurance company and they’d reimburse you.

    Or, if the bill was large, you’d submit the bill to the insurance company and they’d make a remittance to the Dr. who’d send you an amended bill. You’d pay that.

    Either way, price was up front and part of the discussion. Just like everything else in a market economy.

    Somewhere in the 1980’s, the insurance companies finagled themselves in between the Dr and patient. For everyone’s convenience of course. Now, neither the Dr not the patient really knows what things cost. How can you garner all the benefits and efficiencies of free markets when neither the buyer nor the seller know what the product costs?

    My wife was supposed to have an MRI this morning. She received a call yesterday afternoon at four from the imaging location that insurance was denying her claim because of some missing information so they deemed it not medically necessary. Her options were to sign a waiver that if insurance ended up still denying to pay that we’d be fiscally responsible or come in as a cash patient and the bill would be 50% off. After she hung up, the office called back a little later and said that her doctor is in a different tier and we’d get a better price cut of about 30% of the first bill. What a mess and the imaging company probably doesn’t know what that MRI really costs.

    We went this morning ready to pay for it ourselves. Turned out that my wife’s doctor forgot to do some other prep work so the imaging couldn’t happen at all. It was rescheduled for in a few weeks.

    • #19
    • October 23, 2020, at 9:30 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  20. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western ChauvinistJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Man of Consta… (View Comment):

    The only way to bring the costs of healthcare down is to keep the government from subsidizing so much of it. Removing all those ridiculous government-mandated insurance requirements will bring the cost of insurance down, but you still have to get rid of so much subsidizing.

    I’m old enough to remember how health insurance used to work …

    You’d go to the Dr.

    You’d get a bill.
    You’d pay the bill.

    You’d submit all that to the insurance company and they’d reimburse you.

    Or, if the bill was large, you’d submit the bill to the insurance company and they’d make a remittance to the Dr. who’d send you an amended bill. You’d pay that.

    Either way, price was up front and part of the discussion. Just like everything else in a market economy.

    Somewhere in the 1980’s, the insurance companies finagled themselves in between the Dr and patient. For everyone’s convenience of course. Now, neither the Dr not the patient really knows what things cost. How can you garner all the benefits and efficiencies of free markets when neither the buyer nor the seller know what the product costs?

    My wife was supposed to have an MRI this morning. She received a call yesterday afternoon at four from the imaging location that insurance was denying her claim because of some missing information so they deemed it not medically necessary. Her options were to sign a waiver that if insurance ended up still denying to pay that we’d be fiscally responsible or come in as a cash patient and the bill would be 50% off. After she hung up, the office called back a little later and said that her doctor is in a different tier and we’d get a better price cut of about 30% of the first bill. What a mess and the imaging company probably doesn’t know what that MRI really costs.

    We went this morning ready to pay for it ourselves. Turned out that my wife’s doctor forgot to do some other prep work so the imaging couldn’t happen at all. It was rescheduled for in a few weeks.

    Sorry to hear. We Chauvinists know how stressful it can be waiting for an MRI (one every 3 months for Little Miss Anthrope). And we have some idea of how expensive they are given the EOB, although our insurance covers most of it — for now.

    • #20
    • October 23, 2020, at 9:47 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  21. DrewInWisconsin, Man of Consta… Coolidge

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    My wife was supposed to have an MRI this morning. She received a call yesterday afternoon at four from the imaging location that insurance was denying her claim because of some missing information so they deemed it not medically necessary. Her options were to sign a waiver that if insurance ended up still denying to pay that we’d be fiscally responsible or come in as a cash patient and the bill would be 50% off. After she hung up, the office called back a little later and said that her doctor is in a different tier and we’d get a better price cut of about 30% of the first bill. What a mess and the imaging company probably doesn’t know what that MRI really costs.

    We went this morning ready to pay for it ourselves. Turned out that my wife’s doctor forgot to do some other prep work so the imaging couldn’t happen at all. It was rescheduled for in a few weeks.

    Frustrating.

    • #21
    • October 23, 2020, at 11:11 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  22. Bishop Wash Member

    DrewInWisconsin, Man of Consta… (View Comment):

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    My wife was supposed to have an MRI this morning. She received a call yesterday afternoon at four from the imaging location that insurance was denying her claim because of some missing information so they deemed it not medically necessary. Her options were to sign a waiver that if insurance ended up still denying to pay that we’d be fiscally responsible or come in as a cash patient and the bill would be 50% off. After she hung up, the office called back a little later and said that her doctor is in a different tier and we’d get a better price cut of about 30% of the first bill. What a mess and the imaging company probably doesn’t know what that MRI really costs.

    We went this morning ready to pay for it ourselves. Turned out that my wife’s doctor forgot to do some other prep work so the imaging couldn’t happen at all. It was rescheduled for in a few weeks.

    Frustrating.

    It is. The silver lining is that the time delay will allow her to get paperwork from previous doctors to hopefully show the medical necessity and have insurance cover it. Lots of hair pulling late yesterday though and trepidation this morning. 

    • #22
    • October 23, 2020, at 12:24 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  23. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge

    The people who might pay attention to this lie and vote accordingly are only in the middle (meaning they haven’t decided yet on who to vote for), and only if this affects them directly, as some of the examples above illustrate.

    Lie? Sure. Does it move the needle? Probably not by very much. What’s more disturbing is that BarryCare ™ happened, millions lost coverage, doctors decided to call it a day, and the narrative still persists that it was a good thing.

    Not one more person who was ill was treated who would not have been treated otherwise. The rest is political selling, at the expense of taxpayers.

    Again. I notice Biden’s got a couple of sweet homes. Seems it worked out well for him, and Burisma Boy.

    • #23
    • October 23, 2020, at 2:14 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  24. JamesSalerno Coolidge

    Obamacare was trash and a perfect example of why the free market always wins. My routine blood work all of the sudden became subject to an $800 deductible. So I would get hit with bills for over $500 every year for preventative work. Ridiculous. My insulin prices also tripled, and my prescriptions could only be written for 30 days, instead of 90. I could get 90 days if I used the insurance company’s preferred pharmacy mail order service, but I had to leave a credit card on file with them for automatic refills, yet they couldn’t tell me what my refills cost until they drew from my account. Obamacare was a disaster.

    • #24
    • October 23, 2020, at 3:31 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  25. Flicker Coolidge

    What gets me about the whole ACA repeal and replace argument is that people alwys ask, But what are you going to replace it with?

    This is a disingenuous misdirection. The medical insurance field worked, and could have used a few basic enhancements by deregulation. Such as the federal government allowing the sale of medical insurance plans across state lines. Tort reform. Offering low premium, high deductible medical insurance for catastrophic medical illnesses and emergencies. Inheritable HSAs. Uncoupling medical insurance from government tax subsidies; that is, making it paid for by the patient rather than offered as a perk of employment which gives employers a tax benefit.

    So medical insurance worked for most people, and could have been made better. Instead of coming up with a replacement plan, as the Democrats have phrased the debate, all we have to do is reinstitute the old system and in part deregulate and detax medical insurance. This will also tend to lower medical prices.

    I think this is what Trump is alluding to in his various plans depending on the SCOTUS ruling.

    • #25
    • October 23, 2020, at 3:43 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  26. MichaelKennedy Coolidge

    Vance Richards (View Comment):

    Ekosj: CBS News reported that more than two million Americans were told they could not renew their insurance policies for 2014

    One of my best friends had that happen to him. He had been buying his own insurance for years and then after Obamacare went into effect the insurance company told him they could no longer offer him coverage but that he might qualify for expanded Medicaid. So someone who could afford to pay his own way was told to move to a government subsidized plan.

    Kozak (View Comment):

    How many here had their insurance policies change to where they had enormous deductibles and massive increase in premium costs? Does Biden think people don’t remember that?

    Yup. It costs more but it covers less.

    That was the whole point of Obamacare. It was to expand Medicaid and pay for it with the middle class. The original intent was to roll all the employer funded plans into it but the Democrats chickened out at the end. Too many of those plans were for union members. The Democrats decided it would cost them too much in elections.

    • #26
    • October 23, 2020, at 4:00 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  27. Retail Lawyer Member

    I lost my health insurance as a result of the ACA. The replacement was accurately described by Bill Clinton as costing twice as much and being half as good. Of course, my problem was that I was paying my own freight. This caused me great consternation and forever eliminated the possibility of me ever being an undecided voter. I will never vote for a person who supported the ACA.

    California famously has the “Covered California” website to choose your plan and calculate your subsidy (or not, if you have an income). It was one of the few state sites that actually worked, and it cost almost a billion dollars. Everybody was pictured as so happy on the site, like a Summers Eve douche commercial. And they were all minority, and many appeared to be recent immigrants enjoying their free stuff. They were thanking me. Nonetheless, I could not make it through the Orwellian site, and went uninsured for a year. I later explained the problem to my tax guy and he said he hears that alot, but has a solution. You can have a broker navigate the site for you. That is what I had to do. Somehow the broker was free to me, and she said she was very busy signing up people who found the site too humiliating and insulting to make it through to the end.

    • #27
    • October 23, 2020, at 4:48 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  28. Unsk Member

    I lost my health insurance as a result of the ACA. The replacement was accurately described by Bill Clinton as costing twice as much and being half as good.

     I think I had the same company for a while ( Blue Cross) but the coverage I originally purchased was radically downgraded and of course the price went up. Way up. Not sure if that qualifies as if I lost my insurance but the effect was the same.

    From Tyler O’Neil at PJM via ProPulblica:

    “Four sources deeply involved in the Affordable Care Act tell NBC News that 50 to 75 percent of the 14 million consumers who buy their insurance individually can expect to receive a “cancellation” letter or the equivalent over the next year because their existing policies don’t meet the standards mandated by the new health care law. One expert predicts that number could reach as high as 80 percent.”

    • #28
    • October 23, 2020, at 5:42 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  29. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western ChauvinistJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Flicker (View Comment):

    What gets me about the whole ACA repeal and replace argument is that people alwys ask, But what are you going to replace it with?

    This is a disingenuous misdirection. The medical insurance field worked, and could have used a few basic enhancements by deregulation. Such as the federal government allowing the sale of medical insurance plans across state lines. Tort reform. Offering low premium, high deductible medical insurance for catastrophic medical illnesses and emergencies. Inheritable HSAs. Uncoupling medical insurance from government tax subsidies; that is, making it paid for by the patient rather than offered as a perk of employment which gives employers a tax benefit.

    So medical insurance worked for most people, and could have been made better. Instead of coming up with a replacement plan, as the Democrats have phrased the debate, all we have to do is reinstitute the old system and in part deregulate and detax medical insurance. This will also tend to lower medical prices.

    I think this is what Trump is alluding to in his various plans depending on the SCOTUS ruling.

    Oh, it’s not just Democrat phrasing. I’ve been angry at Republicans for using the “repeal and replace” language from the get-go. Idiots.

    Get the damn government out of our healthcare!

    • #29
    • October 23, 2020, at 7:53 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  30. Headedwest Coolidge

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    I’m old enough to remember how health insurance used to work …

    You’d go to the Dr.

    You’d get a bill.
    You’d pay the bill.

    You’d submit all that to the insurance company and they’d reimburse you.

    I’m older than you. When I was a kid in the 1950s, you’d just pay the doctor for a visit. If there was a prescription, you’d pay the pharmacy. All of this was within the means of an ordinary family.

    Health insurance was Blue Cross & Blue Shield. But it was called “hospitalization insurance”. If you had to go to the hospital for treatment Blue Cross paid the hospital and Blue Shield paid the doctors at the hospital. The hospital was where the costs could escalate past what you could pay, so the insurance covered those extreme events.

    The idea that you would have to have insurance to pay the doctor and buy some pills would have confounded my parents.

    • #30
    • October 23, 2020, at 8:36 PM PDT
    • 5 likes