Walking Away…

 

A thoughtful video in which a young woman (who first worked as a teacher and later as a nurse) explains her reasons for walking away from the Democratic Party. Long, but interesting.

1.2 million views and 30,000 subscribers so far.

Published in General
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

There are 37 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Matt Bartle Member
    Matt Bartle
    @MattBartle

    I watched this over the weekend after reading about it on Powerline. It is very good.

    Especially toward the end where she says that now she can stop pretending to believe things she doesn’t actually believe. And she can think about and talk about topics that the Left has declared off limits.

    • #1
  2. B. W. Wooster Member
    B. W. Wooster
    @HenryV

    My wife watched this over the weekend as well and encouraged me to do so.  Will take a closer look.  

    • #2
  3. EDISONPARKS Member
    EDISONPARKS
    @user_54742

    I feel bad this sweet young lady is about to be brutalized by the vicious intolerant Lefty(ie: Biden voters) smear machine.

    Hopefully, she already the took the ensuing blow back into consideration before she decided to tell her story.

    • #3
  4. Gossamer Cat Coolidge
    Gossamer Cat
    @GossamerCat

    I’ve watched a couple of these types of apologias.  It takes a lot of courage to do this, so I feel they deserve attention, but it also gives insight into the left and how people unquestionably accept the lies they peddle.  “I trusted the Democrat brand.”

    • #4
  5. Gossamer Cat Coolidge
    Gossamer Cat
    @GossamerCat

    EDISONPARKS (View Comment):

    I feel bad this sweet young lady is about to be brutalized by the vicious intolerant Lefty(ie: Biden voters) smear machine.

    Hopefully, she already took that into consideration before she decided to tell her story.

    I think it interesting that she uses the word “punish” a lot.  She slowly realized that all these progressive policies punish the people they are designed to serve.  Once she had that realization, she probably felt an obligation to come forward.  

    • #5
  6. namlliT noD Member
    namlliT noD
    @DonTillman

    If anybody is not familiar with Brandon Straka’s #WalkAway video channel, you should check them out.  This is an amazing movement.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb4InP9mRZR9oogD1b2dOQ

    • #6
  7. Freeven Member
    Freeven
    @Freeven

    Converts are the most effective spokespeople for Conservatism. Conservatives would do well to pay attention to what these people identify as their tipping points, as what  one finds compelling others might find also.

    • #7
  8. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Starting about 21:00 she mentions a situation that I’ve written about before. It seems like anyone who has seen “mainstream media” reporting on events that they had firsthand knowledge of, saw that the media got it wrong. So, does it make sense to assume/believe that the media is actually still correct, on everything else that you DON’T have firsthand knowledge of? Of course not! The logical conclusion is that the media is just as wrong – often deliberately! – on everything else, even if you don’t have firsthand knowledge of it.

    • #8
  9. namlliT noD Member
    namlliT noD
    @DonTillman

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Starting about 21:00 she mentions a situation that I’ve written about before. It seems like anyone who has seen “mainstream media” reporting on events that they had firsthand knowledge of, saw that the media got it wrong. So, does it make sense to assume/believe that the media is actually still correct, on everything else that you DON’T have firsthand knowledge of? Of course not!

    Ah, the “Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect” as presented by Michael Crichton:

    Quote:

    “Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

    In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.”

    (There used to be a Wikipedia page on this, but it appears to have disappeared.)

    • #9
  10. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    namlliT noD (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Starting about 21:00 she mentions a situation that I’ve written about before. It seems like anyone who has seen “mainstream media” reporting on events that they had firsthand knowledge of, saw that the media got it wrong. So, does it make sense to assume/believe that the media is actually still correct, on everything else that you DON’T have firsthand knowledge of? Of course not!

    Ah, the “Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect” as presented by Michael Crichton:

    Quote:

    “Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

    In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.”

    (There used to be a Wikipedia page on this, but it appears to have disappeared.)

    Of course it disappeared, they certainly don’t want any real truth getting out!

    • #10
  11. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    It was also very powerful that, especially being an ER nurse and witnessing miscarriage at 20 weeks, she realized that a “clump of cells” is actually a human being.  And that she no longer viewed pro-life as being some kind of attack on women.

    • #11
  12. sawatdeeka Member
    sawatdeeka
    @sawatdeeka

    “You can’t have a society where people feel like chumps for following the rules.” 

    I am feeling that one, as lately it seems like the law has been on the side of criminals and against the citizen quietly minding his own business and doing what he is supposed to do. 

    • #12
  13. sawatdeeka Member
    sawatdeeka
    @sawatdeeka

    Interesting that she felt like she was not allowed to think about these issues. 

    • #13
  14. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    Interesting that she felt like she was not allowed to think about these issues.

    Getting people to self-limit their thoughts has been going on, especially at universities, for a long time.  An especially egregious early example was the indoctrination program that the University of Delaware implemented as part of their Residence Life program.  I wrote about this back in 2009…eleven years ago.  You can read some examples of the very intrusive personal questioning that was conducted as part of this program, here.

    I greatly admire the woman in the second example, the one illiterately labeled ‘Worse one-on-one.” The Designated Indoctrinator was especially disturbed when she responded to the question:

    When was a time you felt oppressed? Who was oppressing you? How did you feel?

    …by saying:

    “I am oppressed everyday on basis of my undying and devout feelings for the opera. Regularly passerbys throw stones at me and jeer me with cruel names. Because of this I am exiled and often contemplate suicide. Unbearable adversity. But I will overcome, hear me, you rock loving majority.

    I was reminded by U-Delaware’s activities, and am reminded by a whole lot of things today, of a German folk song dating from the early Middle Ages:  Die Gedanken Sind Frei.  This translates as “the thoughts are free”…in one of the many versions of the song, it is “only the thoughts are free.”

    It was apparently the desire of the University of Delaware–and the desire of the administrations of many other American universities and other places–that not even the thoughts should be free. As the professor interviewed in the video said, the long-term effect of programs such as the ResLife program at Delaware is to create conformity.

    You can listen to the MIDI version of the song here.

     

    • #14
  15. Vectorman Member
    Vectorman
    @Vectorman

    David Foster (View Comment):
    I was reminded by U-Delaware’s activities, and am reminded by a whole lot of things today, of a German folk song dating from the early Middle Ages: Die Gedanken Sind Frei. This translates as “the thoughts are free”…in one of the many versions of the song, it is “only the thoughts are free.”

    The original German Folk song:

    In the aftermath of the failed 1848 German Revolution the song was banned.

    Gustav Mahler used this text in 1898 Des Knaben Wunderhorn:

    The Baritone sings the text, with answers from the Soprano.

    • #15
  16. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    Sophie Scholl, then 21 years old, played Die Gedanken Sind Frei on her flute outside the walls of Ulm prison, where her father Robert was detained for insulting Adolph Hitler.  Sophie and her brother Hans were later executed for their own resistance activities with the White Rose group.

    • #16
  17. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Did someone say Ulm???????????

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYMRjnM6j6w

    • #17
  18. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    How about some more “likes,” people?  Let’s get this on the Main Feed where the world can see it!

    • #18
  19. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    I tried to like this a second time, in the great Democratic tradition, but all it did was delete my first like.  Hmm.  I wonder if we can do that with casting second votes as well.

    • #19
  20. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Well the good news is, it only needs one more “like” to be considered for promotion.

    • #20
  21. David Foster Member
    David Foster
    @DavidFoster

    A suggestion for those who do Social Media:  link this video, and let us know what kind of reactions you get.

    I did, and am surprised how few reactions & comments I’ve gotten so far, maybe because it’s so long.  I got a positive reaction from one guy who has also linked it on his own feed, and remarked that at least one person had thought she was a fake, a Trump supporter just pretending to be a switcher.  

    Another reaction was that she is painting all Dems with a broad brush, and that her lack of nuanced thinking (as this individual sees it) means she will jump into a rigid form of conservatism and/or Trumpism.

    There were also a couple of comments saying that Trump supporters are different from traditional Republicans…not intended as a positive things about the Trump supporters.

    I’d be interested in hearing about reactions other have gotten.

    • #21
  22. Matt Bartle Member
    Matt Bartle
    @MattBartle

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Did someone say Ulm???????????

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYMRjnM6j6w

    I knew where that was going before I clicked.

    • #22
  23. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Yes!  Welcome to the Main Feed!

    • #23
  24. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist
    @WesternChauvinist

    Wow, is she good! Seems I think it in my brain and she says it out loud. 

    BTW, discovering media malfeasance was one of the things that started to turn me, too. Once I knew the media was withholding information, I became suspicious of the information it was giving me. This is healthy. The media isn’t trustworthy. 

    • #24
  25. Ansonia Member
    Ansonia
    @Ansonia

    She is so beautiful, so like the way my daughter sounded when she saw things by the light of the same dawn about 12 years ago, that I almost started to cry. What a powerful video.

    The world won’t go to Hell yet, because there are young women like her. And the left can’t successfully lie to them for long; because these young women, imperfect as all human beings are, just do naturally hate lies more than most people do. You can bank on it.

    • #25
  26. Terry Mott Member
    Terry Mott
    @TerryMott

    I too watched this a few days ago based on Powerline’s recommendation.  I was reminded of the statistic you often see that claims conservatives tend to be more attractive than liberals.  This young woman is now a prime example.

    Of course, I’m a counter-example, but every rule needs exceptions.

    • #26
  27. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Terry Mott (View Comment):

    I too watched this a few days ago based on Powerline’s recommendation. I was reminded of the statistic you often see that claims conservatives tend to be more attractive than liberals. This young woman is now a prime example.

    Of course, I’m a counter-example, but every rule needs exceptions.

    She definitely became more attractive when she said that she now recognizes that pro-life is not an attack on women.

    • #27
  28. Paul Stinchfield Member
    Paul Stinchfield
    @PaulStinchfield

    namlliT noD (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Starting about 21:00 she mentions a situation that I’ve written about before. It seems like anyone who has seen “mainstream media” reporting on events that they had firsthand knowledge of, saw that the media got it wrong. So, does it make sense to assume/believe that the media is actually still correct, on everything else that you DON’T have firsthand knowledge of? Of course not!

    Ah, the “Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect” as presented by Michael Crichton:

    Quote:

    “Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

    In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.”

    (There used to be a Wikipedia page on this, but it appears to have disappeared.)

    You can find it in Michael Crichton’s page, but it’s odd that all mention would have been removed from Gell-Mann’s page. It is also mention in Gell-Mann’s Wikiquote page.

    • #28
  29. sawatdeeka Member
    sawatdeeka
    @sawatdeeka

    Honestly, in reference to Gell-Mann, I started questioning perspectives on Ricochet on medicine and other specialized areas where I valued conservatives’ expertise once I’d seen a few discussions on education that seemed to be unhelpful and very emotion driven (i.e., referencing black helicopters in discussions of the Common Core).  A frank exploration of the strengths and drawbacks of the Common Core, what it hoped to accomplish along with possible unintended consequences, would have had much more credibility with me, as I’d explored these issues in connection with my job. No need to bring helicopters into it at all. 

    • #29
  30. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Paul Stinchfield (View Comment):

    namlliT noD (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Starting about 21:00 she mentions a situation that I’ve written about before. It seems like anyone who has seen “mainstream media” reporting on events that they had firsthand knowledge of, saw that the media got it wrong. So, does it make sense to assume/believe that the media is actually still correct, on everything else that you DON’T have firsthand knowledge of? Of course not!

    Ah, the “Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect” as presented by Michael Crichton:

    Quote:

    “Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

    In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.”

    (There used to be a Wikipedia page on this, but it appears to have disappeared.)

    You can find it in Michael Crichton’s page, but it’s odd that all mention would have been removed from Gell-Mann’s page. It is also mention in Gell-Mann’s Wikiquote page.

    The “main” wikipedia seems to have some bizarre new “standards” of what can appear on their pages.  I’ve tried to discuss it with them before, but they are unmoveable.

    • #30