Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Mary Tyler Moore, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and the Radicalization of the American Woman

 

Mary Tyler MooreFifty years ago this month, on September 19, 1970, The Mary Tyler Moore Show premiered on CBS. The show featured Mary Richards, a 30-something single, independent, career woman living in Minneapolis. It was – and still is – seen as groundbreaking television, set in the era of second-wave feminism. But Fate seems to have subtle ways of forcing a second look when coincidence seems to be an inadequate explanation.

So it was when Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on September 18. America has changed immeasurable from the day Mary Richards tossed her hat on Nicollet Mall in downtown Minneapolis to the hyper-political environment in defense of abortion and the myth of women’s inequality. We now have a clear-eyed view of just how radicalized the feminist movement has become as we see the response to Justice Ginsburg’s death.

When political movements become a quasi-religion, the most ardent supporters are consumed with its tenets. So it is with modern-day feminism. What once started as the pursuit of equal voting and civil rights devolved into a zero-sum game of abortion-rights and rage at the patriarchy versus the championing of women’s independence beyond the political and cultural one-sided narrative. No matter how many times another layer of the glass ceiling is broken, the only women who gain credit are those who hold views in line with the perpetually leftward pitch of the loudest voices.

If President Trump nominates a woman to the Supreme Court vacancy, as expected, it will be a popcorn-worthy moment. To see those who hailed Justice Ginsburg as a trailblazer and feminist icon ferociously attack any woman nominee will be political theater at its apex. America had a front-row seat to the Senate circus of the Kavanaugh hearings and witnessed the blatant anti-Catholic grandstanding of Diane Feinstein in Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearing to the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. Knowing the incomparably high stakes of the balance of judicial power, and that oftentimes the most non-physical violence comes during the character assassination at the hand of one woman against another, we’re in for a real blood bath.

The landmark case Roe v. Wade, decided in 1973, became the house of cards that would serve as the base for the radical feminist movement for decades to come. Not only was it the established doctrine for feminist leaders such as Gloria Steinem and bell hooks, it was the new litmus test for leftist politicians and a new type of commercial branding that indicated a Modern Woman. For this, Justice Ginsburg was the perfect golden calf. She was a mascot of the #Resistance. For her unfailing support of the leftist cause, proven by staying seated on the Court through a Republican Presidential term even to the detriment of her own personal health, lifted the Notorious RBG to near Joan of Arc-martyrdom.

For a time, her death-defying rebounds after bouts of serious illness made her a legend. But in doing so she allowed herself to be objectified by the feminist left. She was more an iconoclast from the She-Ra Man-Haters Club than the custodian of justice and protector of individual rights granted in the Constitution. In an effort to cling to some leader of a movement predicated on a house of cards so unstable, it seemed her frail hands were the only thing keeping it upright.

The abortion rights “discovered” in the Constitution became the unconditional issue of the feminist left and is the driving force behind the emotional hysteria tied to Justice Ginsburg’s death. When Robert Bork was interrogated in front of the Senate in 1987, it was the first indication of the depths of savage political warfare the Democrats and leftists were willing to engage in to defend the decision. In every conservative nomination since, it was been the leading issue for nominees.

It is defended so ferociously because it is the only tether keeping leftist feminists afloat. For them, motherhood is tantamount to enslavement. It is an obstacle to the path of fulfillment through a woman’s vocation. Choosing family before personal or professional achievement required a concession that women are at the mercy of men’s power. A woman’s needs are secondary to a man’s. It is a surrender to the patriarchy. Feminist leaders promised abortion would free women from the chains of oppression. With sexual freedom would come intellectual freedom, political power, unprecedented independence, and happiness.

But after decades of following the same radical feminist narrative – even if a woman chose to have a family of her own – she must prove her devotion to the sisterhood by supporting abortion ‘rights’. But decades after women’s liberation, women aren’t happier. And two recent studies have shown that even as women gain political, economic, and social freedoms, they are less happy than their 1970s counterparts.

Wolf
Michelle Wolf Celebrates Abortion

The optimism and hopeful naiveté of Mary Richards has given way to a humorless coven of gray-haired professors and political activists. They are somewhere between the bitterness of Great Expectations’ Miss Havisham and Bette Davis’ demented Baby Jane, tortuously imprisoned by her nostalgia in the film Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? Even in a television show lauded for its innovation and feminist-centric central character, the show was never overtly political. In fact, Mary was comfortable showing a demure femininity. The newsroom of WJN was a reflection of a more typical office space in which comradery and compassion mixed well with humor and humility. The audience connected with the situations presented, and had the freedom to laugh with the characters as they navigated life.

If were made today, I doubt if The Mary Tyler Moore Show would make it. Shows like HBO’s Girls are considered masterworks of young feminist prodigies like Lena Dunham. There’s nothing groundbreaking about the show but for the indulgence of Lena Dunham to parade around her apartment in the nude. The chronically unfunny Michelle Wolf and Samantha Bee are held up like some Late Night Feminist, Dashboard Messiahs, whose only talent seems to be mocking conservatives and using their platforms to celebrate abortion. Michelle Wolf, who headlined the 2018 White House Correspondents’ Dinner went so far as hold an abortion “Independence Day.” So much for safe, legal, and rare.

As the nation lays to rest a Supreme Court Justice and feminist hero, it’s worth reflecting on how much the power of the Court and the ramifications of Roe v. Wade influenced the radicalization of feminism. When Mary confesses in an episode, “I get concerned about being a career woman. I get to thinking that my job is too important to me. And I tell myself that the people I work with are just the people I work with.”

No feminist icon today could dare think those words, let alone say them out loud. But don’t tell the Pink Hat brigade; Mary’s statue on Nicollet Mall might be the next one to be toppled.

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  1. Dr. Bastiat Member

    It’s remarkable how fast various leftist “liberation movements” change their focus from individual liberties to coerced conformity.

    • #1
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:05 AM PDT
    • 17 likes
  2. Hoyacon Member

    In 1970, 8.2% of women completed four years of college.

    By 2014, the percentage of women (32%) attaining a four-year degree had surpassed the percentage of men who had done so. This number would undoubtedly be higher among white women, who seem to make up an increasing segment of the angry feminist, pro-abortion base.

    In anticipation of the tedious “you want us barefoot and pregnant” attack, let’s stipulate that attaining an education should, and still can be, a wonderful goal. However, it’s hard not to see the increasing number of women exposed to the teachings at many universities as correlated to the rise of radical politics among them.

    • #2
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:25 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  3. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Dr. Bastiat (View Comment):

    It’s remarkable how fast various leftist “liberation movements” change their focus from individual liberties to coerced conformity.

    And now the even faster movement to “do what we want, or we’ll burn it all down.” Progress, right?…

    • #3
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:49 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  4. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    In 1970, 8.2% of women completed four years of college.

    By 2014, the percentage of women (32%) attaining a four-year degree had surpassed the percentage of men who had done so. This number would undoubtedly be higher among white women, who seem to make up an increasing segment of the angry feminist, pro-abortion base.

    In anticipation of the tedious “you want us barefoot and pregnant” attack, let’s stipulate that attaining an education should, and still can be, a wonderful goal. However, it’s hard not to see the increasing number of women exposed to the teachings at many universities as correlated to the rise of radical politics among them.

    Absolutely. I’m a perfect match for that demographic. I graduated from the University of Minnesota, white, female. Maybe it’s because I grew up in a very ‘unprivileged’ home, the youngest daughter of a working class family who didn’t enjoy much in the way of neither handouts nor hands-up. I saw my parents work for every cent and did the same through college. Maybe it was just my propensity to be an outsider? I’m not sure. But I certainly witnessed plenty of co-eds indulging white guilt propaganda and shaming their friends and family into joining the cult of woke.

    • #4
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:56 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  5. James Gawron Thatcher
    James GawronJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    JennaStocker: If made today, I doubt if The Mary Tyler Moore Show would make it. Shows like HBO’s Girls are considered masterworks of young feminist prodigies like Lena Dunham. There’s nothing groundbreaking about the show but for the indulgence of Lena Dunham to parade around her apartment in the nude. The chronically unfunny Michelle Wolf and Samantha Bee are held up like some Late Night Feminist, Dashboard Messiahs, whose only talent seems to be mocking conservatives and using their platforms to celebrate abortion.

    Jeanna,

    What does “groundbreaking” mean in the context of morality? If it means that a true moral principle long denied, as Dr. King pointed out, will finally be brought to light and implemented in full then who would not cheer. However, if it simply means forever pushing the boundary of good taste or pushing for soulless selfishness or the very destruction of anything that resembles morality then who can not see this as evil.

    When the Gov of Virginia let us know that it was OK to kill a living baby after birth, we should have realized that there was no limit to appeasing this sickness. This is no longer about women. This is about living in a society that condones evil or standing up and saying no!

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #5
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:58 AM PDT
    • 14 likes
  6. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    James Gawron (View Comment):
    This is about living in a society that condones evil or standing up and saying no!

    Jim,

    I agree with you. We don’t need the science because we have faith, but for the political side that uses science as a weapon & a shield in the most cowardly sense, they do their best to deny the humanity of a living soul seen in the most plain light. It’s a tragedy beyond reason, an injustice with no explanation. Thank you for your insight.

    • #6
    • September 23, 2020, at 10:07 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  7. Umbra Fractus Coolidge
    Umbra FractusJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I don’t know what Moore’s political beliefs were, but I’ve heard* that she refused to stand with Gloria Steinem et al. because she felt that second wave feminism was disrespectful to housewives. According to Ed Asner she was actually moving rightward in her later years.

    *I’m too young to have been familiar with her in her prime.

    • #7
    • September 23, 2020, at 11:06 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  8. JoelB Member

    If President Trump nominates a woman to the Supreme Court vacancy, as expected, it will be a popcorn-worthy moment.

    President Trump all but absolutely confirmed in his Pittsburgh speech that the nominee would be a woman. He said he had five women on his short list and jokingly asked if there was anyone present who would rather see a man get the nomination. He then turned serious and said that the woman who gets the nomination will have to take a lot of abuse.

    • #8
    • September 23, 2020, at 11:08 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  9. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    JoelB (View Comment):

    If President Trump nominates a woman to the Supreme Court vacancy, as expected, it will be a popcorn-worthy moment.

    President Trump all but absolutely confirmed in his Pittsburgh speech that the nominee would be a woman. He said he had five women on his short list and jokingly asked if there was anyone present who would rather see a man get the nomination. He then turned serious and said that the woman who gets the nomination will have to take a lot of abuse.

    I think anyone who puts herself in the position to be nominated is well aware of the fight at hand and the arrows about to be aimed her way. The women (and men) still willing to put themselves in this position are up to the challenge.

    • #9
    • September 23, 2020, at 11:13 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  10. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Umbra Fractus (View Comment):

    I don’t know what Moore’s political beliefs were, but I’ve heard* that she refused to stand with Gloria Steinem et al. because she felt that second wave feminism was disrespectful to housewives. According to Ed Asner she was actually moving rightward in her later years.

    *I’m too young to have been familiar with her in her prime.

    I’m not a second-gen feminist, but am a second-gen MTM viewer. I found this to back up your hunch on Mary rejecting Steinem’s brand of feminism: https://thefederalist.com/2017/01/26/mary-tyler-moore-rejected-the-feminism-of-gloria-steinem-and-betty-friedan/

    • #10
    • September 23, 2020, at 11:16 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  11. JoelB Member

    The optimism and hopeful naiveté of Mary Richards has given way to a humorless coven of gray-haired professors and political activists. They are somewhere between the bitterness of Great Expectations’ Miss Havisham and Bette Davis’ demented Baby Jane, tortuously imprisoned by her nostalgia in the film Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? Even in a television show lauded for its innovation and feminist-centric central character, the show was never overtly political. In fact Mary was comfortable showing a demure femininity. The newsroom of WJN was a reflection of a more typical office space in which comradery and compassion mixed well with humor and humility. The audience connected with the situations presented, and had the freedom to laugh with the characters as they navigated life. If made today, I doubt if The Mary Tyler Moore Show would make it.

    A sad commentary on today’s society. Ironic that the show’s theme music, “Love is All Around”, was a bit of romantic interest ending with the line “You’re gonna make it after all“.

    • #11
    • September 23, 2020, at 11:31 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  12. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    JoelB (View Comment):

    The optimism and hopeful naiveté of Mary Richards has given way to a humorless coven of gray-haired professors and political activists. They are somewhere between the bitterness of Great Expectations’ Miss Havisham and Bette Davis’ demented Baby Jane, tortuously imprisoned by her nostalgia in the film Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? Even in a television show lauded for its innovation and feminist-centric central character, the show was never overtly political. In fact Mary was comfortable showing a demure femininity. The newsroom of WJN was a reflection of a more typical office space in which comradery and compassion mixed well with humor and humility. The audience connected with the situations presented, and had the freedom to laugh with the characters as they navigated life. If made today, I doubt if The Mary Tyler Moore Show would make it.

    A sad commentary on today’s society. Ironic that the show’s theme music, “Love is All Around”, was a bit of romantic interest ending with the line “You’re gonna make it after all“.

    Well, maybe it will be ACB’s walk-up song… ;-)

    • #12
    • September 23, 2020, at 11:33 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  13. The Cloaked Gaijin Member

    JennaStocker (View Comment):

    Umbra Fractus (View Comment):

    I don’t know what Moore’s political beliefs were, but I’ve heard* that she refused to stand with Gloria Steinem et al. because she felt that second wave feminism was disrespectful to housewives. According to Ed Asner she was actually moving rightward in her later years.

    *I’m too young to have been familiar with her in her prime.

    I’m not a second-gen feminist, but am a second-gen MTM viewer. I found this to back up your hunch on Mary rejecting Steinem’s brand of feminism: https://thefederalist.com/2017/01/26/mary-tyler-moore-rejected-the-feminism-of-gloria-steinem-and-betty-friedan/

    I think Mark Steyn said that Mary Tyler Moore was a conservative, but I can’t find the clip.

    “In Parade magazine Mary Tyler Moore said [she] was a fan of Fox News and (gasp) Bill O’Reilly. I do watch a lot of Fox News. I like Charles Krauthammer and Bill O’Reilly. …according to Ed Asner, she is/was a fan of Sarah Palin.”

    And apparently Dixie Carter, the star of liberal Designing Women show, was a libertarian of some sort.

    • #13
    • September 23, 2020, at 12:51 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  14. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    The Cloaked Gaijin (View Comment):

    JennaStocker (View Comment):

    Umbra Fractus (View Comment):

    I don’t know what Moore’s political beliefs were, but I’ve heard* that she refused to stand with Gloria Steinem et al. because she felt that second wave feminism was disrespectful to housewives. According to Ed Asner she was actually moving rightward in her later years.

    *I’m too young to have been familiar with her in her prime.

    I’m not a second-gen feminist, but am a second-gen MTM viewer. I found this to back up your hunch on Mary rejecting Steinem’s brand of feminism: https://thefederalist.com/2017/01/26/mary-tyler-moore-rejected-the-feminism-of-gloria-steinem-and-betty-friedan/

    I think Mark Steyn said that Mary Tyler Moore was a conservative, but I can’t find the clip.

    “In Parade magazine Mary Tyler Moore said [she] was a fan of Fox News and (gasp) Bill O’Reilly. I do watch a lot of Fox News. I like Charles Krauthammer and Bill O’Reilly. …according to Ed Asner, she is/was a fan of Sarah Palin.”

    And apparently Dixie Carter, the star of liberal Designing Women show, was a libertarian of some sort.

    It’s interesting how we usually have to do serious sleuthing to figure out who is conservative or at least leans right in Hollywood, but the liberals scream their devotion to leftism as if their hair was on fire.

    • #14
    • September 23, 2020, at 12:58 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  15. Jim Kearney Contributor

    JennaStocker (View Comment):
    It’s interesting how we usually have to do serious sleuthing to figure out who is conservative or at least leans right in Hollywood …

    An epic understatement.

    Lately, Red State politics makes you about as employable as a fingered Red in the 1950’s.

    Even before anyone masked up for COVID, groups of Hollywood conservatives were easily mistaken for a Clayton Moore fan fest.

    Now it’s said some guys are using the lockdowns to recover from reconstructive surgery. A year from now expect a sea of Alec Baldwins.

    • #15
    • September 23, 2020, at 4:34 PM PDT
    • Like
  16. Ekosj Member

    JennaStocker (View Comment):
    But I certainly witnessed plenty of co-eds indulging white guilt propaganda and shaming their friends and family into joining the cult of woke.

    I’m reminded of an op-ed by Camile Paglia where she lampooned Gloria Steinem as a “mummified fascist” and asserted that Steinem had undone and good she had done by marrying feminism to partisan politics. 

    • #16
    • September 23, 2020, at 4:47 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  17. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Jim Kearney (View Comment):

    JennaStocker (View Comment):
    It’s interesting how we usually have to do serious sleuthing to figure out who is conservative or at least leans right in Hollywood …

    An epic understatement.

    Lately, Red State politics makes you about as employable as a fingered Red in the 1950’s.

    Even before anyone masked up for COVID, groups of Hollywood conservatives were easily mistaken for a Clayton Moore fan fest.

    Now it’s said some guys are using the lockdowns to recover from reconstructive surgery. A year from now expect a sea of Alec Baldwins.

    So all the talk about tolerance and equality turns out to be just…acting? I’m shocked, shocked! to find out tolerance extends to only one viewpoint amongst the Hollywood cabal. Maybe the Lone Ranger really is a loner after all.

    And as far as Alec Baldwin look-A-likes – geez, I thought Invasion of the Body Snatchers was scary enough!

    • #17
    • September 23, 2020, at 4:51 PM PDT
    • Like
  18. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    JennaStocker (View Comment):
    But I certainly witnessed plenty of co-eds indulging white guilt propaganda and shaming their friends and family into joining the cult of woke.

    I’m reminded of an op-ed by Camile Paglia where she lampooned Gloria Steinem as a “mummified fascist” and asserted that Steinem had undone and good she had done by marrying feminism to partisan politics.

    Camille Paglia has been a very consistent critic of modern feminism. She never fails to disappoint in her succinct and efficient takedown of people like Steinem who really can’t stand up to any intelligent conversations. She’s a little unconventional herself, but sometimes that’s what it takes to expose these the mirage for what it is. A lot more women might be happier.

    • #18
    • September 23, 2020, at 4:58 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  19. Umbra Fractus Coolidge
    Umbra FractusJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    JennaStocker (View Comment):
    But I certainly witnessed plenty of co-eds indulging white guilt propaganda and shaming their friends and family into joining the cult of woke.

    I’m reminded of an op-ed by Camile Paglia where she lampooned Gloria Steinem as a “mummified fascist” and asserted that Steinem had undone and good she had done by marrying feminism to partisan politics.

    Steinem appeared on Ben Shapiro’s Sunday Special podcast a while back. (Credit to her for being willing to do it, at least.) When the topic of abortion came up she became noticeably agitated. Up until that point she had handled her disagreements with Ben calmly and mostly logically. But when Ben suggested even the possibility that an unborn child might be a living human being she became angry. After a tense back and forth on the subject she let it slip that she had had an abortion herself and thinks the child would have killed her legal career if it had been born.

    My mother suspects that the reason prominent feminists are so all-in on abortion is because they’ve all either had one or have a loved one who’s had one, and they want not just to deny the evil that they’ve done, but to convince society not to judge them either.

    • #19
    • September 23, 2020, at 6:16 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  20. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Umbra Fractus (View Comment):

    Ekosj (View Comment):

    JennaStocker (View Comment):
    But I certainly witnessed plenty of co-eds indulging white guilt propaganda and shaming their friends and family into joining the cult of woke.

    I’m reminded of an op-ed by Camile Paglia where she lampooned Gloria Steinem as a “mummified fascist” and asserted that Steinem had undone and good she had done by marrying feminism to partisan politics.

    Steinem appeared on Ben Shapiro’s Sunday Special podcast a while back. (Credit to her for being willing to do it, at least.) When the topic of abortion came up she became noticeably agitated. Up until that point she had handled her disagreements with Ben calmly and mostly logically. But when Ben suggested even the possibility that an unborn child might be a living human being she became angry. After a tense back and forth on the subject she let it slip that she had had an abortion herself and thinks the child would have killed her legal career if it had been born.

    My mother suspects that the reason prominent feminists are so all-in on abortion is because they’ve all either had one or have a loved one who’s had one, and they want not just to deny the evil that they’ve done, but to convince society not to judge them either.

    I’ll have to look for that conversation. I bet it was good.

    I think your mother is a wise lady.

    • #20
    • September 23, 2020, at 6:19 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  21. Clifford A. Brown Contributor

    JennaStocker: If were made today, I doubt if The Mary Tyler Moore Show would make it.

    And what a loss that would be. Mary, in the real world, leveraged her experience in this show into producing a series of other shows, in which she employed actors whose measure she had taken on the The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

    • #21
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:27 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  22. James Lileks Contributor

    JoelB (View Comment):
    A sad commentary on today’s society. Ironic that the show’s theme music, “Love is All Around”, was a bit of romantic interest ending with the line “You’re gonna make it after all“.

    Written by a guy who was in some band called “The Crickets.” Also wrote “I Fought the Law,” the Omega to “Love is All Around”‘s Alpha.

    • #22
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:41 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  23. James Lileks Contributor

    Great piece; great show. I probably live in this city because of it. Worked in the building where WJM was housed, lived in the complex where the latter seasons took place, ended up working for the newspaper she clutched in her hand in the elevator in the opening sequence. And I was a guy! Imagine the impact it had on young women.

    Fun fact: the car she washes in the opening credits was later purchased by St. Paul’s first transgender politician. 

    • #23
    • September 23, 2020, at 9:52 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  24. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Great piece; great show. I probably live in this city because of it. Worked in the building where WJM was housed, lived in the complex where the latter seasons took place, ended up working for the newspaper she clutched in her hand in the elevator in the opening sequence. And I was a guy! Imagine the impact it had on young women.

    Fun fact: the car she washes in the opening credits was later purchased by St. Paul’s first transgender politician.

    Mary Richards casts a large shadow on the city. I wonder if there’s any other fictional TV character to have such an impact elsewhere? I know there used to be tours that would take you to places from the show/credits; not sure if it includes lunch at (the former) Basil’s, though. I didn’t know about Mary’s car – Or what to think of its fate. She was the Midwest version of “New York, New York”.

    • #24
    • September 24, 2020, at 2:39 AM PDT
    • Like
  25. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    JennaStocker: If were made today, I doubt if The Mary Tyler Moore Show would make it.

    And what a loss that would be. Mary, in the real world, leveraged her experience in this show into producing a series of other shows, in which she employed actors whose measure she had taken on the The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

    And inspired a lot of kids to go out and pursue their dreams, even us Midwest kids!

    • #25
    • September 24, 2020, at 2:42 AM PDT
    • Like
  26. Stad Thatcher

    James Lileks (View Comment):
    Fun fact: the car she washes in the opening credits was later purchased by St. Paul’s first transgender politician. 

    Was it a convertible? (Snicker snicker . . .)

    • #26
    • September 24, 2020, at 7:51 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  27. Flicker Coolidge

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    Great piece; great show. I probably live in this city because of it. Worked in the building where WJM was housed, lived in the complex where the latter seasons took place, ended up working for the newspaper she clutched in her hand in the elevator in the opening sequence. And I was a guy! Imagine the impact it had on young women.

    Fun fact: the car she washes in the opening credits was later purchased by St. Paul’s first transgender politician.

    What’s the difference between transgender and transsexual… and transvestite?

    • #27
    • September 24, 2020, at 8:32 AM PDT
    • Like
  28. Front Seat Cat Member

    Beautifully said and written. Back when the Mary Tyler Moore show was on, TV writing reflected the changing culture, but never lost its humor. Today, everything is vulgar. Now we have the fluid-gender culture, where anything goes, and women are even angrier. The pink hat party was an example – ranting, screaming – belittling, and glorifying death. Mary Tyler Moore would have been appalled, along with Rhoda. 

    • #28
    • September 24, 2020, at 10:15 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  29. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Beautifully said and written. Back when the Mary Tyler Moore show was on, TV writing reflected the changing culture, but never lost its humor. Today, everything is vulgar. Now we have the fluid-gender culture, where anything goes, and women are even angrier. The pink hat party was an example – ranting, screaming – belittling, and glorifying death. Mary Tyler Moore would have been appalled, along with Rhoda.

    I agree. I think I’m addition to creativity and humor, subtlety is another lost art in entertainment. Controversy and applause has more value it seems than talent. I’ll just stick to my nostalgia tv reruns!

    • #29
    • September 24, 2020, at 11:52 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  30. Front Seat Cat Member

    JennaStocker (View Comment):

    Front Seat Cat (View Comment):

    Beautifully said and written. Back when the Mary Tyler Moore show was on, TV writing reflected the changing culture, but never lost its humor. Today, everything is vulgar. Now we have the fluid-gender culture, where anything goes, and women are even angrier. The pink hat party was an example – ranting, screaming – belittling, and glorifying death. Mary Tyler Moore would have been appalled, along with Rhoda.

    I agree. I think I’m addition to creativity and humor, subtlety is another lost art in entertainment. Controversy and applause has more value it seems than talent. I’ll just stick to my nostalgia tv reruns!

    All in the Family is even funnier today than when it came out – and it would never fly today!

    • #30
    • September 24, 2020, at 12:18 PM PDT
    • 3 likes