Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. School Is in Session

 

School started in our bigger district yesterday — it starts in the smaller district next week. Parents and kids are thrilled. Our county deputies and police officers welcomed kids to the local schools.

If you recall my earlier conversation, several political entities tried to stop schools from opening but the governor and attorney general came down on the side of local school boards making their own decisions. I hope things only get better from here. As of yesterday, we have no documented active cases of COVID in our county.

Published in General
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

There are 33 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Nohaaj Coolidge

    Looks great. You know there will be cases of ‘vid. I hope that your local school districts don’t immediately shut everything down when that happens. 

    • #1
    • August 13, 2020, at 8:29 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  2. Susan Quinn Contributor

    How exciting! I hope the enthusiasm is contagious across the country. And that the virus is not!

    • #2
    • August 13, 2020, at 8:39 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  3. EODmom Coolidge

    I love the picture. It says so much. The Big Guys are there and the Little Gal walks calmly. 

    • #3
    • August 13, 2020, at 8:42 AM PDT
    • 12 likes
  4. Aaron Miller Member
    Aaron MillerJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    It was a bit depressing to see a picture of my nephew headed to kindergarten in a medical mask. But his eyes were smiling. 

    My older niece tried to begin school online. She was able to connect with the first class Zoom meeting via her tablet. But she somehow couldn’t log in for the second class and never overcame those technical difficulties. I assume a thousand other parents and teachers encountered similar problems. I’m told a local radio host remarked that she was exhausted before even beginning her work day because of schooling difficulties. 

    I helped a computer-illiterate college instructor prepare for online classes. It’s an administrative mess, with all the usual technological struggles of computers to boot. 

    So much would benefit if we could all agree on the basic facts regarding COVID-19, the risks, and the remedies. But we are making decisions based on wildly different understandings of the problems and conditions to overcome. 

    • #4
    • August 13, 2020, at 8:46 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
  5. Chuck Thatcher

    Drove by the local elementary school yesterday. Sign out front announces a “drive-by meet and greet”. 

     

    • #5
    • August 13, 2020, at 9:06 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  6. Stina Member

    Housebroken (View Comment):

    Drove by the local elementary school yesterday. Sign out front announces a “drive-by meet and greet”.

     

    #depressing

    • #6
    • August 13, 2020, at 9:10 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  7. Bob Thompson Member

    There is an opportunity here in this election season to reverse the hollowing out of the educational process. Locals must take back control of this process and restore the family.

    • #7
    • August 13, 2020, at 9:22 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
  8. Old Bathos Moderator

    It is amazing how quickly some people incorporated WuFlu hysteria into their personal identity. Climate change, systemic racism, transgender ‘rights’, and now mask-wearing and the eternal shutdown. I think they include the same people who thought that we should tie yellow ribbons around trees to get back our embassy people held hostage in Iran (instead of bombing the bastards) and who still have Hillary! bumper stickers on a Prius.

    Like with climate change, a sensibility is somehow conflated with “science”. The polar bear is nearly extinct, sea level is rising 5 feet a year and COVID will kill millions if we open the schools and stop reporting mask scofflaws.

    • #8
    • August 13, 2020, at 10:56 AM PDT
    • 7 likes
  9. DonG (skeptic) Coolidge

    Tex929rr: School started in our bigger district yesterday-

    In-person schooling should put your district kids at an advantage over other districts. Fight for it.

    • #9
    • August 13, 2020, at 11:09 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  10. Bob Thompson Member

    Here is something I’ve been trying to figure out, if anyone has the numbers that will confirm or deny, I’d like to hear.

    Media touts whatever number makes President Trump look bad, I think, like the last one I heard was a new national daily record for the number of deaths due to Covid-19. It seems like the Covid-19 cases are now dispersed across the United States more so than at any earlier point in time. For example, early in the pandemic the numbers were very high in New York and other northeastern states. Is it surprising to have a new national record number with the cases more distributed nationwide when the earlier record was due to a high number of cases in a small geographical area? Does my question make any sense?

    • #10
    • August 13, 2020, at 11:39 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  11. kylez Member
    kylezJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    It’s awful going back the second week of August though. Especially in Texas, I’m sure.

    • #11
    • August 13, 2020, at 11:59 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  12. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Here is something I’ve been trying to figure out, if anyone has the numbers that will confirm or deny, I’d like to hear.

    Media touts whatever number makes President Trump look bad, I think, like the last one I heard was a new national daily record for the number of deaths due to Covid-19. It seems like the Covid-19 cases are now dispersed across the United States more so than at any earlier point in time. For example, early in the pandemic the numbers were very high in New York and other northeastern states. Is it surprising to have a new national record number with the cases more distributed nationwide when the earlier record was due to a high number of cases in a small geographical area? Does my question make any sense?

    I saw some detailed numbers yesterday but can’t remember the source. State by state and county by county numbers still vary by huge amounts. NY state still is almost an outlier in the huge death rate there. Case count is almost irrelevant as so many are asymptomatic and still only a relatively small cohort have been tested. 

    • #12
    • August 13, 2020, at 12:16 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  13. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr

    DonG (skeptic) (View Comment):

    Tex929rr: School started in our bigger district yesterday-

    In-person schooling should put your district kids at an advantage over other districts. Fight for it.

    I’m on the board in the small district. We are already committed to open next week. Lots of uncertainty as no one is sure how many parents will opt for remote learning. Survey results were about 30 percent but we won’t know until the first day.

    • #13
    • August 13, 2020, at 12:18 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  14. Jules PA Member

    Good for you no active cases.

    I’d love to know how common it is for counties to have zero cases. 

    That is some serious isolation. 

    • #14
    • August 13, 2020, at 1:45 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  15. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr

    Jules PA (View Comment):

    Good for you no active cases.

    I’d love to know how common it is for counties to have zero cases.

    That is some serious isolation.

    It’s all pretty strange. We have had two deaths and all other cases are considered recovered (143). But no hospitalizations. We have to use the numbers the state health department gives us. Current county population is 47,000. 

    • #15
    • August 13, 2020, at 2:07 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  16. Jon1979 Lincoln

    Our district goes back Monday. The district has spent the past three days giving every student a tablet or chromebook, just in case remote learning has to come back, but the plan now is for K-12 in-class learning. Students and parents do have the option to do remote learning, but the district said it’s not going to be the bogus efforts during the spring, and students staying home will have to use their portable devices to watch the classes in real-time, and will have to take the same tests that students in the classrooms take (you can do extracurricular sports/band/academics and remote learn under Texas rules, but as one of the teachers said, that doesn’t mean you can sleep in until 2 p.m. and then go to practice at 3:30).

    I’ll be interested to see what the numbers turn out to be next week on in-person students vs. those families who opt for remote learning.

    • #16
    • August 14, 2020, at 6:13 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  17. Giulietta Coolidge

    What a sweet photo. I’m glad things started well for you.

    I’m getting ready to go back. There’s a post in all of this- we’ll be in-person, but the demands are ridiculous on both faculty and students alike. I’m curious about what other teachers and parents will make of it. Good luck:)

    • #17
    • August 14, 2020, at 7:17 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  18. Steve C. Member

    Day 2 of back to school in my wife’s North Texas district. The district internet crashed. They are doing first 3 weeks remote and then face to face.

    Not sure why it happened but I would think they should have anticipated that.

    • #18
    • August 14, 2020, at 8:04 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  19. Mister Dog Coolidge

    Nohaaj (View Comment):

    Looks great. You know there will be cases of ‘vid. I hope that your local school districts don’t immediately shut everything down when that happens.

    Our school is on track to start next week. Elementary five days a week, secondary four days with Fridays online. As a bus driver I’m looking forward to getting back to work. I hope there is no panic when the inevitable cases show up.

    • #19
    • August 15, 2020, at 12:43 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  20. Old Buckeye Member

    My grandkids in north Texas are going to do the online Edgenuity program offered by their district. My daughter is a worry-wart and left-thinking, so decided that she wasn’t going to let her kids be guinea pigs in the in-person attempts at school because she couldn’t believe anything that came from the White House or Fox News. She has a friend who taught with the program in California and said it was pretty easy so I encouraged her to come up with supplemental fun enhancements to do with the kids instead of parking them in front of the TV (which Grandma saw way too much of when I visited…). Grandma will also be on the lookout for anything I can send them to help with critical thinking, problem solving, and the like (all suggestions welcome!). 

    • #20
    • August 15, 2020, at 6:03 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  21. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western ChauvinistJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    There is an opportunity here in this election season to reverse the hollowing out of the educational process. Locals must take back control of this process and restore the family.

    In Colorado, this is the huge advantage of state-chartered public schools. They have an in-house school board, typically populated by parents with literal skin in the game. They do not report to an impersonal district board one-level up, but are supervised by the DoE, charter school division, at the state level. This leaves state-chartered schools a lot of freedom, at least until their periodic performance review comes around. It’s as close as we can get to subsidiarity in the public school system. 

    One thing I don’t want to see “return to normal” is public education. Liberty lovers will miss a crucial opportunity if things don’t change pretty radically. And we have to destroy the lefty indoctrination project or the republic is over. Last chance.

    • #21
    • August 15, 2020, at 7:35 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  22. Bob Thompson Member

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    but are supervised by the DoE, charter school division, at the state level.

    Why do local public schools have federal oversight? I think that is probably about funding. So federal oversight is bought in a process that resembles bribery. This is exactly how Democrat politicians (and many Republicans as well) get and hold office by delivering federal funding for state and local functions. The state politician is effectively bribed to deliver those goods. 

    If my view of this is wrong or seriously skewed, please someone here give me the data supporting the correct view so I can get this out of my head.

    • #22
    • August 15, 2020, at 8:20 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  23. Old Buckeye Member

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    One thing I don’t want to see “return to normal” is public education.

    Definitely agree, WC! I wish dear daughter would just decide to go all-in and homeschool but she admits she’s too lazy to do so. We homeschooled her (much younger) brother because we lived in a state that was more amenable to homeschooling when he was of school age. She used to say she wished she’d been homeschooled, but now can’t do that for her kids. 

    • #23
    • August 15, 2020, at 8:53 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  24. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western ChauvinistJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    but are supervised by the DoE, charter school division, at the state level.

    Why do local public schools have federal oversight? I think that is probably about funding. So federal oversight is bought in a process that resembles bribery. This is exactly how Democrat politicians (and many Republicans as well) get and hold office by delivering federal funding for state and local functions. The state politician is effectively bribed to deliver those goods.

    If my view of this is wrong or seriously skewed, please someone here give me the data supporting the correct view so I can get this out of my head.

    I don’t have actual numbers to cite, but, if I’m correct, the portion of federal funds going to school districts is actually pretty small. A huge portion of Colorado’s state budget goes to education (via property taxes) and lawmakers are always asking for more. State lawmakers are only too happy to comply with federal mandates on education to receive even minimal federal funds because that’s their basic MO. It’s just what they do. Make rules. Follow rules. Fund rules. (unless you’re the feds and you just print the money)

    Ben Shapiro has a video in which he counters the “systemic racism” narrative, but he gets part of the education funding piece wrong.

    In Colorado, and I suspect in a lot of states, property taxes are pooled and “redistributed” based on a per pupil basis. If you live in a lousy neighborhood and revenues from property taxes are therefore low in your area, it should have no effect on the funding your neighborhood school receives. Several years ago (when I was more involved and aware), the per pupil funding schools received was about $6k/student, with special needs students receiving $10k and upwards to $15k. Charters tend to receive the minimum since they don’t typically have the services for special needs students; and they pay their non-unionized teachers less than regular ed teachers, but more than private school teachers make. They tend to run lean, but they also have more flexibility in applying for and receiving grants than regular ed schools, since regular public schools always fall under the “pooling” mandate, even for grants. 

    My concern with education is content and local control. People with interests closest to the students (i.e., parents) should be in charge. The state-chartering system works pretty well because the state only gets involved if the school is failing (the Caesar Chavez charter school which was denied its charter renewal in our area; my kids’ school and other classical ed charters are still going strong). Vouchers might help, but I’d even prefer in-house school boards over vouchers if I was making policy.

    • #24
    • August 15, 2020, at 8:59 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  25. Stina Member

    Old Buckeye (View Comment):
    Grandma will also be on the lookout for anything I can send them to help with critical thinking, problem solving, and the like (all suggestions welcome!). 

    There’s some great subscription boxes like kiwibox and mel’s chemistry that send the recipient a project and the tools and materials to do it.

    I keep trying to sell grandparents on them because they’d be great fun and learning tools for parents and kids.

    • #25
    • August 15, 2020, at 9:05 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  26. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr

    I posted this a while back: I just checked our budget for 20-21 and federal and state $$ combined are 25.8 percent of our total budget. The federal portion is actually 1.3 percent. The local remainder is all from property taxes.

    • #26
    • August 15, 2020, at 10:31 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  27. Bob Thompson Member

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    I posted this a while back: I just checked our budget for 20-21 and federal and state $$ combined are 25.8 percent of our total budget. The federal portion is actually 1.3 percent. The local remainder is all from property taxes.

    Thanks. Is all the centralized curriculum then really controlled by the NEA and collateral organizations including the Department of Education when run by Democrats?

    • #27
    • August 15, 2020, at 10:35 AM PDT
    • Like
    • This comment has been edited.
  28. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    I posted this a while back: I just checked our budget for 20-21 and federal and state $$ combined are 25.8 percent of our total budget. The federal portion is actually 1.3 percent. The local remainder is all from property taxes.

    Thanks. Is all the centralized curriculum then really controlled by the NEA and collateral organizations including the Department of Education when run by Democrats?

    No. Even the much despised Common Core was a somewhat loose set of guidelines. Districts with weak staff bought prepackaged curricula from vendors and that’s where the awful stuff comes from. In our case (Texas) the state education agency writes the standards that define what students must learn by grade level (and by class for high school). The state testing is based on what is in the state standards. The feds have some input in that they approve state testing schemes as meeting their requirement to report student progress. It seems like we (Texas) had to argue with them a few years back about whether some of our testing was adequate, but I don’t remember the details.

    Now, I take issue with a lot of things but at least it’s created and monitored on the state level.

    • #28
    • August 15, 2020, at 10:45 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  29. Z in MT Member

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Here is something I’ve been trying to figure out, if anyone has the numbers that will confirm or deny, I’d like to hear.

    Media touts whatever number makes President Trump look bad, I think, like the last one I heard was a new national daily record for the number of deaths due to Covid-19. It seems like the Covid-19 cases are now dispersed across the United States more so than at any earlier point in time. For example, early in the pandemic the numbers were very high in New York and other northeastern states. Is it surprising to have a new national record number with the cases more distributed nationwide when the earlier record was due to a high number of cases in a small geographical area? Does my question make any sense?

    I saw some detailed numbers yesterday but can’t remember the source. State by state and county by county numbers still vary by huge amounts. NY state still is almost an outlier in the huge death rate there. Case count is almost irrelevant as so many are asymptomatic and still only a relatively small cohort have been tested.

    The US daily deaths are currently less than half of the peak in April. The case numbers did peak about 4 times higher, which is a large function of testing increasing by more than a factor of 10 of what it was in April.

    • #29
    • August 15, 2020, at 10:55 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  30. PennyGaffney Coolidge

    Tex929rr:

    School started in our bigger district yesterday — it starts in the smaller district next week. Parents and kids are thrilled. Our county deputies and police officers welcomed kids to the local schools.

    If you recall my earlier conversation, several political entities tried to stop schools from opening but the governor and attorney general came down on the side of local school boards making their own decisions. I hope things only get better from here. As of yesterday, we have no documented active cases of COVID in our county.

    Congratulations. In KY our governor successfully bullied many local school districts into reversing their decisions to offer in-person instruction before September 28.

    • #30
    • August 15, 2020, at 11:52 AM PDT
    • Like