Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Dead Can Vote in New Hampshire

 

James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas has struck again.  The organization’s latest exposé reveals how easy it is to vote in New Hampshire — even if you’re deceased.

On New Hampshire Primary Day, Project Veritas sent a team of investigators into polling places with a list of deceased voters to see if they would be permitted to vote.

We tested more than a dozen polling places, simply walking up and stating the name of the deceased, and in all but one instance — where an alert poll worker actually knew the recently deceased — we were handed ballots.

While our investigators cast no votes and returned the ballots, there was nothing stopping our team, or anyone else, from illegally influencing the outcome of a presidential primary.

In fact, as shown in the video, Project Veritas investigators insisted on presenting identification in order to vote, but were told repeatedly, “you don’t need it.

With the 8 vote margin in the 2012 Iowa Caucus, it is clear that voter fraud can influence the outcome of an election.   It is important to note that Project Veritas’ team had the ability to cast more than a dozen votes in this latest investigation.

Here’s the first video of the investigation, though Project Veritas has plans to reveal more.

(h/t Daily Caller)

There are 32 comments.

  1. Percival Thatcher

    So what? In Cook County, not only can the dead vote, they do it in alphabetical order!

    • #1
    • January 12, 2012, at 4:08 AM PST
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  2. Diane Ellis Contributor
    Diane Ellis Post author

    A college classmate of mine recently posted this image on his Facebook wall with the following caption.

    Voter-Fraud.jpg

    There is a huge problem in America right now; young people aren’t voting. What’s worse is that many politicians know this, and make great efforts to keep it that way. They figure it’s easier to suppress student voters who tend to vote a certain way than to appeal to them with strong messages or good ideas. As far as we’re concerned this is the ultimate theft. It destroys our faith in the political system and makes our democracy less inclusive and less representative. Maybe politicians should worry less about rigging laws for their own job security (re-election) and start worrying about the job security of their constituents.

    Our ensuing exchange was…pretty lively. And I was glad to be able to add a link to O’Keefe’s video to rebut his claim that “voter fraud is a red herring.”

    • #2
    • January 12, 2012, at 4:13 AM PST
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  3. Percival Thatcher

    How exactly did being able to prove who you are become a race thing? Are the airlines discriminating against people by requiring identification before issuing boarding passes?

    • #3
    • January 12, 2012, at 4:21 AM PST
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  4. EJHill Podcaster

    My father passed away in 1976. He was still listed on the Ohio voter rolls the second time I voted for Reagan.

    • #4
    • January 12, 2012, at 4:24 AM PST
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  5. John Grant Contributor

    Whew. I am glad to hear that vote fraud is not confined to Cook County–we wouldn’t want to discriminate against the rest of the country!

    • #5
    • January 12, 2012, at 4:43 AM PST
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  6. Misha A. Inactive

    Do these same critics of voter ID have a problem with ID checks for buying alcohol and cigarettes? If not, do they really consider voting less important than the aforementioned activities?

    • #6
    • January 12, 2012, at 4:56 AM PST
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  7. Give Me Liberty Inactive
    Percival: How exactly did being able to prove who you are become a race thing? Are the airlines discriminating against people by requiring identification before issuing boarding passes? · Jan 11 at 3:21pm

    Yes, flying is only for white people preferably, people with names like Chip and Buffy, or at least that is what I’ve learned from watching TV.

    P.S. This is also true for renting cars, getting jobs, shopping in supermarkets, seeing a doctor…

    • #7
    • January 12, 2012, at 5:02 AM PST
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  8. Nathaniel Wright Member

    When there is no research into the prevalence of voter fraud, it is easy to claim that it is a red herring. Then again, the assertion that the intent is voter suppression is equally a red herring. We do not live in 1920. We are not passing Jim Crow laws where different people have different requirements in order to participate in the process.

    The idea that presenting an ID is suppressive is on its face ridiculous, but some young people act as if a Professor or Teacher tells them it is suppressive then it is. They need no evidence to back their non-falsifiable claim. There is no evidence you can provide to convince them otherwise, because they aren’t concerned with the actual effects of Voter ID laws. Rather they are concerned with the “intent” behind them, and they “know” why you want voter ID laws. It isn’t so that you can ensure that all Caucus participants are eligible — something Mrs. Clinton certainly wonders about those Nevada Caucuses — oh no. It is so you can make people go to DMV to get a free ID and get caught when it is discovered they are undocumented.

    • #8
    • January 12, 2012, at 5:15 AM PST
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  9. John Marzan Inactive

    from where i live, not only am i required to show a valid ID to vote, but I am also required to have my forefinger dipped in ink after voting.

    • #9
    • January 12, 2012, at 5:24 AM PST
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  10. Daniel Warwick Inactive

    Its no coincidence that the deciding vote in the Supreme Court decision affirming voter identification laws was Justice John Paul Stevens — a citizen of the great state of Illinois.

    • #10
    • January 12, 2012, at 6:15 AM PST
    • Like
  11. Mollie Hemingway Contributor

    I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with.

    • #11
    • January 12, 2012, at 6:38 AM PST
    • Like
  12. Fricosis Guy Listener

    Ah…I had been thinking on the ride home from work last night: “Boy, Romney’s going to need O’Keefe and Breitbart vs. the Chicago Boys. Where are they?”

    Busy re-loading, apparently!

    Diane Ellis, Ed.: James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas has struck again.
    • #12
    • January 12, 2012, at 6:39 AM PST
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  13. Liver Pate Inactive
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm

    I’d really like to have some role in the upcoming elections for President and, even though I’m Canadian, its encouraging to hear that in New Hampshire, Cook County and elsewhere that may no longer be an issue.

    Huzzah!

    • #13
    • January 12, 2012, at 6:46 AM PST
    • Like
  14. Western Chauvinist Member
    Diane Ellis, Ed.: A college classmate of mine recently posted this image on his Facebook wall with the following caption.

    There is a huge problem in America right now; young people aren’t voting. What’s worse is that many politicians know this, and make great efforts to keep it that way. They figure it’s easier to suppress student voters who tend to vote a certain way than to appeal to them with strong messages or good ideas. As far as we’re concerned this is the ultimate theft. It destroys our faith in the political system and makes our democracy less inclusive and less representative. Maybe politicians should worry less about rigging laws for their own job security (re-election) and start worrying about the job security of their constituents.

    Our ensuing exchange was…pretty lively. And I was glad to be able to add a link to O’Keefe’s video to rebut his claim that “voter fraud is a red herring.” ·

    Yer classmate is giving me the vapors, Diane. The results of the 2008 elections would indicate too many clueless gullible young people are voting! Vote buying by Obama forgiving student debt… not a huge problem?

    • #14
    • January 12, 2012, at 6:47 AM PST
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  15. BlueAnt Member
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with.

    I’m generally against “requiring papers” for everyday tasks or basic common law freedoms. The classic example is requiring ID or permits simply to move about the country and cross internal regional boundaries, thus restricting the natural right to freedom of movement.

    But there are a few freedoms that translate into tangible government functions. These functions are closely tied to specific, individual citizens. You want to make sure a jury is composed of one’s peers; you want to ensure someone running for office is who they claim to be; and you want to make sure only eligible voters in a district cast votes.

    Producing ID for rare but structurally critical events like voting should be fine. And I would argue voting has a double mandate for ID: since democratic voting is the foundation of our nation’s structure, any fraud in its execution weakens the legitimacy of the entire political system.

    • #15
    • January 12, 2012, at 7:00 AM PST
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  16. Misthiocracy grudgingly Member
    Pseudodionysius
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm
    I’d really like to have some role in the upcoming elections for President and, even though I’m Canadian, its encouraging to hear that in New Hampshire, Cook County and elsewhere that may no longer be an issue.

    In fact, you could probably vote in every primary, if yer cagey enough!

    • #16
    • January 12, 2012, at 7:11 AM PST
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  17. Kervinlee Member
    Israel P.: The unremarked part of the video is that if anyone can vote by naming someone on the list, the real voters can get disenfranchised. (“Sorry, Mrs. Obama. Yes of course I recognize you, but someone else voted on your name already.”)

    I also found it curious that no one said “You look awfully young for someone born in 1925.” Or was O’Keefe using actual octogenarians? · Jan 11 at 11:02pm

    I was thinking the same thing. Another twist to their sting might have been (although it may have meant casting a fraudulent vote which I’m sure they were scrupulous to avoid) to have an impostor sign in and vote, then have second impostor approach claiming to be the same deceased voter and ask for a ballot. How would the poll workers respond to this possibly stolen vote?

    In an aside, I think the voter rolls in my area only list the voter by name and address. I don’t think the voter date of birth is listed.

    • #17
    • January 12, 2012, at 7:14 AM PST
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  18. wilber forge Member
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm

    Then require proof of citizenship to vote.

    • #18
    • January 12, 2012, at 7:14 AM PST
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  19. Charlotte Member
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm

    Mollie, just out of curiosity, why not? Is it the overall Big-Brotherness of it, or is there a more specific reason?

    As an aside, for a time I was registered to vote in three different states simultaneously due to a succession of moves. Is that a record?

    • #19
    • January 12, 2012, at 7:27 AM PST
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  20. Sisyphus Member
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm

    I fully understand and somewhat share the sentiment, but the systematic abuse of the current flimsy system by fraudsters such as ACORN demands sterner measures. One person at a Tea Party event told me about a law enforcement briefing she received on the 2008 election and some of the methods used that were detected. She passionately urged the entire room to sign up for True the Vote and position themselves as observers before the usual suspects, the unions et. al., fill the slots early with their people, as they are inclined to do.

    My polling place was asking for ID last November, and I was glad to see it.

    The racism charge is the usual risible lie, in my experience it comes from the same folks that push the registration of prison inmates.

    • #20
    • January 12, 2012, at 8:12 AM PST
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  21. smp16 Inactive

    I’m a resident of a northern suburb of Chicago that’s outside of Cook County, and when I vote in person (rather than absentee, which I’ve done a lot due to being at school), I’m always asked to show ID. I really don’t get the argument against it. Until someone provides some solid evidence that asking for ID tramples on voters’ liberties, I will continue to see it as whining that their side might lose out on some illegal votes.

    • #21
    • January 12, 2012, at 8:19 AM PST
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  22. outstripp Inactive

    I don’t live in Japan any more, but when I hear stories like this and recall the Iowa vote counting snafu, I can hear (in my mind) Japanese saying, “Americans are incapable of doing anything well.” By well they mean without screwing up a little.

    Americans are tolerant of little mistakes, it is true, and sometimes that is the wise strategy, but sometimes I think they don’t (or can’t) take serious jobs seriously enough.

    • #22
    • January 12, 2012, at 8:22 AM PST
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  23. No Caesar Thatcher

    This is another “present” from the Democrats over the last decade to use “any means necessary” to get and retain power; to turn a purple state blue. Here in NH you used to need an ID to vote, the Democrats snuck this change through so that they could get the votes of college students — of whom there are many in NH, MA and VT and who tend to vote Democrat. For the past several elections college students and unionistas have been bused in from Massachusetts and VT to vote in NH. Also in-state college students have dual-registered here and in their home states.

    The Dems got it and kept it by shouting “racist” if criticized, managing to present the charade that Jim Crow was alive in the Granite State. After the 2006 election, NH — for the first time in a century – had a complete Democrat sweep of the legislature, executive council and governor. The GOP now has recovered the legislature and the executive council, but until we have all three back Democrats will not allow this to be cleaned up.

    • #23
    • January 12, 2012, at 8:38 AM PST
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  24. wilber forge Member

    Ask this, how many developed countries require proof of citizenship or I.D. to vote ? Without that and a close chain of custody on the process, we are now a Third World voting Nation that deserves no respect or trust in the outcomes.

    • #24
    • January 12, 2012, at 9:42 AM PST
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  25. Pilli Inactive
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm

    Without an ID requirement, how do you ensure one person one vote?

    • #25
    • January 12, 2012, at 10:26 AM PST
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  26. Kervinlee Member

    That video of the credulous poll workers leads me to lose confidence in our ability to survive as a free, self-governing people. Have we lost the ability to be skeptical, and to insist on common sense?

    We are more and more giving up on using our brains.

    • #26
    • January 12, 2012, at 10:36 AM PST
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  27. Mollie Hemingway Contributor
    Pilli
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm
    Without an ID requirement, how do you ensure one person one vote? · Jan 12 at 9:26am

    When I was an election judge in Colorado, we had a sheet listing every eligible voter and their address. When they voted, we marked it off so they couldn’t vote again. Also, the same election judges had to work the whole day to monitor the situation and ensure integrity. Each political party supplied one judge and we also had an independent judge as well. There were also poll monitors to make sure there was no corruption going on.

    • #27
    • January 12, 2012, at 10:47 AM PST
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  28. Misthiocracy grudgingly Member
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.

    Pilli

    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm
    Without an ID requirement, how do you ensure one person one vote? · Jan 12 at 9:26am
    When I was an election judge in Colorado, we had a sheet listing every eligible voter and their address. When they voted, we marked it off so they couldn’t vote again. Also, the same election judges had to work the whole day to monitor the situation and ensure integrity. Each political party supplied one judge and we also had an independent judge as well. There were also poll monitors to make sure there was no corruption going on. · Jan 12 at 9:47am

    And how did you verify that the person voting was who they claimed they were?

    • #28
    • January 12, 2012, at 10:50 AM PST
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  29. Israel P. Inactive

    The unremarked part of the video is that if anyone can vote by naming someone on the list, the real voters can get disenfranchised. (“Sorry, Mrs. Obama. Yes of course I recognize you, but someone else voted on your name already.”)

    I also found it curious that no one said “You look awfully young for someone born in 1925.” Or was O’Keefe using actual octogenarians?

    • #29
    • January 12, 2012, at 12:02 PM PST
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  30. No Caesar Thatcher
    Mollie Hemingway, Ed.: I don’t think people should be required to show state-issued identification to vote. But, then again, I’m leery of how much the state controls things through identification requirements to begin with. · Jan 11 at 5:38pm

    Let’s not be too precious and throw the baby out with the bath-water. On the micro level, every illegitimate vote has disenfranchised a legitimate vote. On the macro level, in a 50/50 nation — which we are and will be for some time to come — the growing sense that the level of illegitimate voting is becoming statistically significant enough to turn elections will, through a forseeable chain, lead to widespread unrest and worse. Identification — whatever the source — is imperitive where the situation is zero-sum.

    • #30
    • January 13, 2012, at 7:42 AM PST
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