Black Christianity

 

Black Christianity again shows what it takes to show a spine. After my piece on Denzel Washington and Anthony Mackie, and after Terry Crews, another brave black man refuses to subscribe to BLM, this time a young NBA player, Jonathan Isaacs, and again it’s in the name of the Gospel–he says, black lives matter and all lives matter. This is now a question — everyone else knelt during the anthem, everyone else had a BLM shirt. A quick transformation of elite America became Kaepernick was a scandal. Everyone with a camera pointed at him seems to be a coward these days. It’s funny… We should stand up and support these brave men. God bless you, Jonathan Isaacs!

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  1. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    I think that those same sports journalists should be asking the kneelers what the problem with “All Lives Matter” could possibly be?

    Of course they won’t. They are tools. Their tramp stamps read “Stanley.”

    • #1
  2. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Testify, Brother Jonathan!

    • #2
  3. notmarx Member
    notmarx
    @notmarx

    The questions asked young Jonathan Isaacs were infuriating. If not vicious, clueless. He answered from a heart overflowing with Christian charity. It was obvious his inquisitor was incapable of hearing him. Maybe later, maybe by Grace.

    • #3
  4. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    notmarx (View Comment):

    The questions asked young Jonathan Isaacs were infruriating. If not vicious, clueless. He answered from a heart overflowing with Christian charity. It was obvious his inquisitor was incapable of hearing him. Maybe later, maybe by Grace.

    I have heard, but can’t verify, that at least one of the journalists asking about his “reasoning” was white. 

    If only he had responded “Justify your white privilege in asking that question to a black man.”

    The tu quoque of the age.

    • #4
  5. Samuel Block Support
    Samuel Block
    @SamuelBlock

    Humility and decency, such a rare and pleasant site. Thanks, Titus. I kinda needed that today.

    • #5
  6. Lois Lane Coolidge
    Lois Lane
    @LoisLane

    I bought his jersey to recognize a real act of courage. It’s the only way I know to try and support him.

    • #6
  7. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    I like his response but I think it would have been a bit better if he followed this formula.

     

    NPC Journalist: Do you believe black lives matter?

    Jonathan Isaac: I do. Do you believe that all lives matter?

    NPC Journalist: (Some snarky dodge about how racist everything is.)

    Jonathan Isaac: Christianity teaches us that racism is bad because we are equal in the eyes of G-d. 

    • #7
  8. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    I like his response but I think it would have been a bit better if he followed this formula.

     

    NPC Journalist: Do you believe black lives matter?

    Jonathan Isaac: I do. Do you believe that all lives matter?

    NPC Journalist: (Some snarky dodge about how racist everything is.)

    Jonathan Isaac: Christianity teaches us that racism is bad because we are equal in the eyes of G-d.

    It’s not up to him to confront journalists acting on the principles of America’s elites. He’s just a young man–not the elected representative of people who say ‘all lives matter’, or an appointee of those politicians, not the employee of some conservative publication or Republican think tank or whoever we may say legitimately should act to this purpose.

    • #8
  9. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    Lois Lane (View Comment):

    I bought his jersey to recognize a real act of courage. It’s the only way I know to try and support him.

    This is a good question. What mortifies me is, so few conservative publications give a damn. & I’ve heard no conservative leaders make an effort to connect with black Christians, since Christianity is an even older connection between black & white in America than citizenship!

    I try to do some writing, but editors are not knocking down my door to publish what I have to say.

    • #9
  10. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Titus Techera (View Comment):

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    I like his response but I think it would have been a bit better if he followed this formula.

     

    NPC Journalist: Do you believe black lives matter?

    Jonathan Isaac: I do. Do you believe that all lives matter?

    NPC Journalist: (Some snarky dodge about how racist everything is.)

    Jonathan Isaac: Christianity teaches us that racism is bad because we are equal in the eyes of G-d.

    It’s not up to him to confront journalists acting on the principles of America’s elites. He’s just a young man–not the elected representative of people who say ‘all lives matter’, or an appointee of those politicians, not the employee of some conservative publication or Republican think tank or whoever we may say legitimately should act to this purpose.

    I wasn’t criticizing him. I was wishing that a different perspective had been presented. The proposition “the color of your skin must determine the outcome of your reasoning” is racism, no matter the color of your skin or the outcome of your reasoning.

    • #10
  11. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    Yeah. Maybe we could put it this way–if we compel public figures, & especially officials, to act on common sense & to speak it, then it will be the obvious thing to do for people who are compelled to make public speeches, but didn’t choose it, to say, this is America, we don’t need this drama…

    So the principle you imply “the color of your skin does not determine your reasoning” leads to the conclusion–“I can only deal with me, not with the public, not with America, not with history. I’m free of racial determination, I’m also free not to deal with the whole racial drama. I can deal with my own concerns. But I can’t deal with other people’s concerns–that’s for those other people to do.”

     

    • #11
  12. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Titus Techera (View Comment):

    Yeah. Maybe we could put it this way–if we compel public figures, & especially officials, to act on common sense & to speak it, then it will be the obvious thing to do for people who are compelled to make public speeches, but didn’t choose it, to say, this is America, we don’t need this drama…

    So the principle you imply “the color of your skin does not determine your reasoning” leads to the conclusion–“I can only deal with me, not with the public, not with America, not with history. I’m free of racial determination, I’m also free not to deal with the whole racial drama. I can deal with my own concerns. But I can’t deal with other people’s concerns–that’s for those other people to do.”

     

    I am a proponent of offense being the best defense. After the common sense, respond to questions such as those asked of Mr. Issac with “That question is either racist or stupid” and go on to the next question. Or drop the mic.

    • #12
  13. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Percival (View Comment):

    Titus Techera (View Comment):

    Yeah. Maybe we could put it this way–if we compel public figures, & especially officials, to act on common sense & to speak it, then it will be the obvious thing to do for people who are compelled to make public speeches, but didn’t choose it, to say, this is America, we don’t need this drama…

    So the principle you imply “the color of your skin does not determine your reasoning” leads to the conclusion–“I can only deal with me, not with the public, not with America, not with history. I’m free of racial determination, I’m also free not to deal with the whole racial drama. I can deal with my own concerns. But I can’t deal with other people’s concerns–that’s for those other people to do.”

     

    I am a proponent of offense being the best defense. After the common sense, respond to questions such as those asked of Mr. Issac with “That question is either racist or stupid” and go on to the next question. Or drop the mic.

    I get your point but the dude probably just wants to play his sport. He has to justify being left alone. 

    • #13
  14. Goldgeller Member
    Goldgeller
    @Goldgeller

    Good article!

    • #14
  15. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    Yeah, defense depends on the principle that each man is free to mind his own business. But to take offense requires another principle than what we can state as “I’m free of X determination.” (Where X might be race, ethnicity, color, creed, sex, or whatever else it is America offers you freedom from.)

    It requires, among other things, something that brings people together, so that the player would have a way to claim that he speaks for any number of other people, preferably for the majority of the American people.

    Since it’s obvious that America allows people to claim politically racial determination. Nobody is committing a crime by requiring all black people to believe something. That, too, is understood to be part of freedom of speech, association, &c.

    • #15
  16. GFHandle Member
    GFHandle
    @GFHandle

    Titus Techera (View Comment):
    Nobody is committing a crime by requiring all black people to believe something.

    It may not be a crime to require someone to believe something, but it sure goes against the American grain–or used to. Now schools, corporations, neighbors, even family members do so routinely. I wish I knew an answer, but I don’t.

    • #16
  17. Buckpasser Member
    Buckpasser
    @Buckpasser

    Titus Techera (View Comment):
    “the color of your skin does not determine your reasoning”

    In America today it does.

    • #17
  18. thelonious Member
    thelonious
    @thelonious

    Lois Lane (View Comment):

    I bought his jersey to recognize a real act of courage. It’s the only way I know to try and support him.

    Probably a good investment. This kid has the potential to be one of the best players in the league. He’s only in his second year and still very raw. Based on his answer he sounds like a mature young man who has his stuff together. I can’t help but root for the guy now.

    • #18
  19. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Buckpasser (View Comment):

    Titus Techera (View Comment):
    “the color of your skin does not determine your reasoning”

    In America today it does.

    No it does not. Wokists are trying to force people to think this or that way based on their skin color but they are meeting with mixed success. 

    • #19
  20. GFHandle Member
    GFHandle
    @GFHandle

    Lois Lane (View Comment):

    I bought his jersey to recognize a real act of courage. It’s the only way I know to try and support him.

    Good on you!

    You We might also consider buying Larry Elder’s documentary “Uncle Tom,” (at uncletom.com), which pushes back against the idea that identity confers specific values. If it makes a ton of money, maybe Hollywood will start to notice that they are ignoring a big market.

    • #20
  21. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    This is American freedom & it also leads to the national paralysis we now see; it certainly is full of confusion. Now, we look at America & we finally understand how it was possible for the whole country to whistle through the 1850s & lead to the worst American slaughter, past or, hopefully, future. Nobody was in a position to say, “since we’re all free as Americans, you all have to listen to me & we have to get out of this mess together.” Nobody can now speak to Americans & say America’s gotta escape the coming calamity. Worse, wokies are part of an attempt to get out of this paralysis–perhaps like the Dems who provoked the civil war through national crises… Stephen Douglas wasn’t trying to make things worse, but he did…

    For my part, I’m for escaping the calamity & my guess is what it takes is people signing on the line that is dotted to support whoever seems to them likely to be of help in practical as opposed to symbolic ways. Sure, each man minds his own business & is kinda jealous or envious of anyone who might show off or talk big. But at the same time, we’re learning this mess isn’t going away, but getting worse every year. The way of dealing with public matters we are used to has failed; it’s time to look at that other part of America we don’t much talk about, where things get done. Those resources are now needed…

    • #21
  22. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo… Thatcher
    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Demo…
    @GumbyMark

    Titus Techera (View Comment):

     

    For my part, I’m for escaping the calamity & my guess is what it takes is people signing on the line that is dotted to support whoever seems to them likely to be of help in practical as opposed to symbolic ways.

    ABC – Always Be Closing is good advice. We are talking about persuasion, not “owning the libs“, or the rhetorical comebacks we all know, sometimes employ, and can be a lot of fun. Not in these circumstances. As Victor Lazlo said to Rick, “welcome to the fight“.

     

    • #22
  23. Titus Techera Contributor
    Titus Techera
    @TitusTechera

    That’s right! All the minor conflicts & crises we go through are to be understood as: What alliance have we concluded on this occasion? What institution have we built or modified or put to work on this occasion? Political conflict is supposed to be a practical education in this way–how to get people together to do things for the common good with a future where these things can be done well enough without so much drama!

    I look around at the spectacle of conservative media–people don’t see that; they think the spectacle is itself the point…

    • #23