Another Stay Lift at SCOTUS

 

Wesley Ira Purkey is all set to meet his maker. The Supreme Court lifted injunctions issued earlier by lower courts and allowed the execution to proceed. Sometimes, however, it’s important to examine the basis that the four liberals on the court use as justification for allowing this animated sewage to cling to life. Justice Sotomayor wrote in dissent that “proceeding with Purkey’s execution now, despite the grave questions and factual findings regarding his mental competency, casts a shroud of constitutional doubt over the most irrevocable of injuries.”

In case you weren’t paying attention, that’s complete BS and Sotomayor likely knows it.

It always bothers me when someone in the position of a judge dispenses more compassion for a cold-blooded killer than for the victims of that killer. Purkey has plenty of mental competency, and it’s worth noting that he’s set up for the death penalty by his own machinations. He confessed to the murder of a 16-year-old girl in Missouri solely to get “federal time” which he viewed as more comfortable than time in a Kansas prison. He was certainly mentally competent enough to do that.

Then there’s the whole idea that Purkey – who cut up the body with a chain saw, burned it, and disposed of the remains in a septic pond – somehow isn’t now to blame because years of drug abuse might have caught up with his brain. No one forced him at gunpoint to stick that crap in his veins. But now those veins will at least get to serve a useful purpose. Somewhere along the line, the Supreme Court went off track when it decided that if a prisoner who was competent enough to stand trial and be given the death penalty, but now cannot appreciate the fact that he’s being punished for that act, can’t be executed. We are to believe that’s cruel. No. That’s simply a ridiculous position from the jump. What’s cruel is allowing this plasmodia slime to continue to breathe the same air the rest of us do.

The point of the death penalty is not that the convict knows and appreciates the fact that he’s being punished. Who cares? I don’t care if he thinks he’s taking a trip on the Yellow Brick Road when he walks down to the death chamber. The point is the pervert won’t ever be able to do a similar killing again. While you could make the same claim about life in prison, you’d be wrong. Prison is a social structure that encourages the most violent and deadly to inflict pain and punishment on those who have less ability to resist it. People like Purkey don’t deteriorate in prison, they excel in it. In addition, you, the taxpayer, have the job of feeding, clothing, and giving medical care (sometimes better care than is available to private patients) to people who would just as soon kill their doctor as visit him. How about our courts start thinking about the rest of us?

Mental health groups advocated for Purkey to get life instead. They said, “[w]e believe that proceeding with his execution would violate the U.S. Constitution’s prohibition on executing people who are not competent to understand the reason for their execution…” But, find that in the Constitution for me. It isn’t there. How can it be cruel to put to death someone who raped, killed, dismembered, burned, and threw into a septic pond a beautiful high school sophomore? Supposedly his mental health deteriorated while in prison. But who wants to bet the moment that someone commutes his sentence that he won’t spring right back up as the sadistic killer he really is? Heck, he’ll probably stick a shiv in someone to celebrate. When your life is at stake you can run the long con pretty effectively. You can act like you’re nuts. And don’t tell me a psychiatrist can tell us for sure. Most of them are just as crazy.

We need a return in this country to the basic principles of right and wrong. We need to make capital punishment something to be feared. In the 1940s and 1950s, the mean time between conviction and execution was measured in months. Now that time is measured in years. Purkey has been eating your food and getting free medical care for 22 years. It’s well past time for him to pay the piper.

It’s also well past time for judges who do not have jurisdiction over the prison in Indiana to stop issuing stay orders. Judge Tanya Chutkan is a district judge in DC and she has no jurisdiction in Indiana. Yet, she issued an injunction to stop the execution in the hours prior to the scheduled execution. As you might have already guessed, she’s an Obama appointee, so the rule of law is less important than sticking a fork in the eye of the Attorney General. A complaint form is available online to seek discipline of federal judges. I’ll just throw that out there.

Published in Law
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

There are 6 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Well said. Paul Mirengoff commented the gross delay in justice is “an unconscionable compromise” between supporters and opponents of the death penalty. This killer butchered a 16 year old girl with a chainsaw and separately was convicted in  state court of killing an 80 year old woman with a claw hammer. He was convicted of the federal charge in 2004.

    Now the “compromise” is discarded by the rising left. The Squad wants no life sentences. So, the lawyers and leftist lawyers in black gowns have created the system of decades of delay. They then argued it would be better to just abolish the death penalty and make the penalty life in prison. Now that faithless position is gone. If Biden is elected, there will be no more death penalty and no more true life sentence. The leftist elected officials are already signaling this publicly before  November so they can claim a mandate.

    • #1
  2. Fritz Coolidge
    Fritz
    @Fritz

    I would add that where a state’s laws allow for capital punishment, and a defendant in a capital case that has been conducted under all the myriad of safeguards of due process, has been condemned by the jury to die, all appeals having been exhausted, I find it unconscionable for a governor of said state (I’m looking at you, Inslee) to simply declare a “moratorium” and refuse to allow any executions to proceed while they hold the governor’s office.

    What part of fulfilling the executive’s duty to faithfully carry out the laws is such a virtue-signalling posture, anyway?

    • #2
  3. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Anthony L. DeWitt: Justice Sotomayor wrote in dissent that “proceeding with Purkey’s execution now, despite the grave questions and factual findings regarding his mental competency, casts a shroud of constitutional doubt over the most irrevocable of injuries.” 

    I guess this means you have to be insane to kill someone the way he did . . .

    • #3
  4. James Gawron Inactive
    James Gawron
    @JamesGawron

    Anthony L. DeWitt: How about our courts start thinking about the rest of us?

    Anthony,

    I think you have hit upon a theme. Keep up the good work.

    Regards,

    Jim

    • #4
  5. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    You can act like you’re nuts. And don’t tell me a psychiatrist can tell us for sure. Most of them are just as crazy.

    A friend of mine’s mother was a psychiatrist who worked in prisons in West Virginia and Ohio.  She and her husband were born and raised in the Philippines.  She had such a thick accent, I could never understand what she said.  I always wondered how some criminally insane person, struggling to be cured, might react to a doctor who seemingly spoke gibberish to him.  

    The only real problem with the death penalty is that it is not carried out with more immediacy.

    • #5
  6. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    Anthony L. DeWitt: Somewhere along the line, the Supreme Court went off track when it decided that if a prisoner who was competent enough to stand trial and be given the death penalty, but now cannot appreciate the fact that he’s being punished for that act, can’t be executed.

    That would never have been a problem in the first place if he’d have been executed back in 2005.

    • #6
Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.