Bobby Jindal Pulverizes Obama’s Failing Energy Policy

 

As Rob wrote about yesterday, part of the Republican strategy going into November’s election should include a sharp focus on Obama’s failing energy policy and the gas crisis that is emerging as a result.

And at an Republican Governors’ Association press conference yesterday, LA Gov. Bobby Jindal demonstrated that he really gets it.  Have a look.  Gov. Jindal sounds awfully presidential here, no?

<iframe src=”http://player.vimeo.com/video/37592926?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0″ width=”400″ height=”225″ frameborder=”0″ webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/37592926″>Gov. Bobby Jindal on Energy</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/repgovs”>Republican Governors Association</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a>.</p> 

I completely agree with Jim Geraghty who writes at The Campaign Spot that Jindal’s excellent explanation “ought to be emulated by every aspiring Republican president – and every other GOP candidate at any level, for that matter.”

There are 39 comments.

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  1. Profile Photo Inactive
    @maureendirienzo

    I’d also like to know the extent to which oil prices are driven up by inflation associated with the government’s voracious borrowing and spending. 

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    @Idahoklahoman

    This video confirms my belief that Bobby Jindal needed to be in this race. 2016 will be too late, Gov. Jindal.

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    @SeverelyLtd

    Second only to Paul Ryan as a dream candidate.

    • #3
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    @katievs

    If we really do end the primary season with a stalemate, he’s an alternative I could definitely get behind.    Almost the only one.

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    @AustinMurrey

    Jindal’s my current favorite for a future Republican president.  Like Mitch Daniels, leading the should-be-in-the-race primary according to the commentariat, he can speak clearly and intelligently on matters that are important to the average voter.  Unlike Mitch Daniels he can talk engagingly as well.

    My vote for 2016 (regardless of who wins in ’12): Jindal/Rubio.  Campaign motto: Stick that in your pipe and smoke it.

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    @kesbar

    After hearing the reporter’s framing of the question, I’m convinced that Jindal was casting pearls before swine. 

    That said, his response was deft, firm and respectful.   He can be on my team.

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    @ParisParamus

    Jindal and Ryan strike me as electrifying next to Romney. In spite of the pun, I mean that sincerely. It’s not a jab at you, PP.

    Sorry, but you give the average voter too much credit if you think either Jindal or Ryan will ever get to be President (except, perhaps via the VP-to-P path).  Ryan’s retort to Obama at that absurd healthcare summit is/ws promising, but I still think Ryan is too low key/professorial to be viable (same for Daniels).  And I think Jindal’s ethnic background is an obstacle to winning the Presidency. 

    Hey, I’d vote for either of them in nano-second, but you need to better channel the average independent voter who decides elections–which, by the way, is why Donald Trump’s endorsement of Romney actually counts for something.

    PS:  I’m gratified that a number of commentators have noticed what I observed in 2008:  Romney (still) speaks too fast.  That’s one of the reasons I would like him locked in a conference room or hotel suite with Mr. Prager, Ms. Coulter, and, maybe, Ms. Breitbart for about 48 hours.

    • #7
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    @BigGreen

    PP – Curious to understand why you think Jindal’s ethnicity would be an obstacle to winning the presidency.  Which Republican constituency / voting block would not support Jindal because of his ethnicity?

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    @ParisParamus

    Which Republican constituency / voting block would not support Jindal because of his ethnicity?

    NONE.  I’m talking about a general election.  And you should be too.

    • #9
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    @BigGreen

    Which “independents” then?

    • #10
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    @ParisParamus

    Which independents?  Any who are sufficiently primitive to care about how “foreign” or different someone looks.  Then there’s the potential for the MSM launch the meme that the Republicans running anyone but a “plain white guy” is somehow a fraud, since “everyone knows that the only real Republicans are while non-ethnic people (would have been used big time if, in a parallel universe, Herman Cain was up for the VP slot.)

    That said, I’m sensing that Gov. Susanna Martinez or Gov. Jan Breuer are in the running for Romney’s VP pick–assuming, of course, Romney is not run over by a NASCAR, or a Cadillac (or two).

    • #11
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    @DianeEllis
    ParisParamus:Jindal and Ryan strike me as electrifying next to Romney. In spite of the pun, I mean that sincerely. It’s not a jab at you, PP.

    Sorry, but you give the average voter too much credit if you think either Jindal or Ryan will ever get to be President (except, perhaps via the VP-to-P path).  Ryan’s retort to Obama at that absurd healthcare summit is/ws promising, but I still think Ryan is too low key/professorial to be viable (same for Daniels). 

    Good point, PP. 

    It’s a strange thing to be a defender of a democratic/representative republic system like ours.  On the one hand, you have to defer to the wisdom and supremacy of the voters — which occasionally (although pretty rarely on a national level) leads to results we highbrow Ricochet sort approve of.  On the other hand, the voters seem to have pretty bad judgment a whole lot of the time. 

    There’s of course no better system, but it does mean that pigs fly before someone like Paul Ryan gets elected.  Who knows, though?  Stranger things have happened.

    • #12
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    @SpinozaCarWash
    ParisParamus:

    That said, I’m sensing that Gov. Susanna Martinez or Gov. Jan Breuer are in the running for Romney’s VP pick–assuming, of course, Romney is not run over by a NASCAR, or a Cadillac (or two). · 2 minutes ago

    Edited 0 minutes ago

    In my estimation, neither Martinez and Brewer is a particularly prudent pick. The former is utterly untested and new to the national stage (sound familiar?); the latter is already “controversial,” “polarizing” and “hostile to immigration.” Brewer’s public personal is thoroughly enmeshed in the H-1070 debacle. Without relitigating the merits of that bill, I think it’s clear the media would gleefully distort both its letter and its spirit to the Democrats’ advantage. I’m sure both executives are generally qualified to serve in a (Romney) administration, but can either speak about the peril of the public fisc with authority?

    • #13
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    @

    With regards to Rob’s p0int in your first line:  It is evident to me that the Republicans have no strategy going into this election.  Let us hope the successful candidate and/or his team does, because the party as a whole looks like a chicken with its head cut off.  This talk lately of a third party of “fiscal” conservatives is just the latest example.  Two years wasted.

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    @WyleeCoyote

    I like how Govs. Bush and Haley hear the question and both look over to Jindal, like “Bobby, this one’s yours.”

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    @

    I haven’t listened to this guy.  How is he on foreign affairs and the terrorist threat at home?  That’s what holds me back from favouring Christie.  If Jindal has a sensible position on such matters perhaps he should be a serious candidate come a brokered convention.  However, Given Gingrich’s already sound position there, I still favour him.  But Jindal would make a great addition to that picture, based on what I see here.

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    @Schwaibold
    Wylee Coyote: I like how Govs. Bush and Haley hear the question and both look over to Jindal, like “Bobby, this one’s yours.” · 11 minutes ago

    Wasn’t that McDonnell (Virginia)?

    • #17
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    @ParisParamus

    Rodriguez, the untested/new issue is a concern, but to whom does it not apply?  McDonnell and Christie have the same length of experience.  Rubio has less.

    What the Women Governors offer is putting a wrench in the DEMSM attack machine; and the prospect of a woman VP would garner some votes; and Martinez gets you some Latino votes, too. 

    The women get you some excitement, which is, sad or not, what Romney will/would need to win in the general.

    • #18
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    @ParisParamus

    Of course, the other VP who would get you excitement is the star of the dream I had:

    I HAD A DREAM.In my dream, Gov. Christie was holding a press conference to announce he was going on a weight loss program because he realized his health was in danger. During the press conference, Christie outlines how difficult it will be to lose weight, and explains how important it is for him to do. He then takes a few questions from the media.

    Christie then appears to wrap up the press conference. He thanks everyone, and starts walking from the podium. But then he suddenly turns around and returns. He says “one more thing. I am going on a diet because my health is at great risk. But there’s something else, the health of which is at great risk. That’s the United States. Our federal government imperils the health and future of our great nation. Our government needs to go on a diet. That is why I have decided to accepted the request of Mitt Romney to run for Vice President.”

    (Romney then suddenly emerges from a door, and we have a winning ticket for November)

    • #19
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    @WyleeCoyote
    jhimmi

    Wylee Coyote: I like how Govs. Bush and Haley hear the question and both look over to Jindal, like “Bobby, this one’s yours.” · 11 minutes ago

    Wasn’t that McDonnell (Virginia)? · 55 minutes ago

    Actually, I think you’re right, and I misidentified him.

    • #20
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    @SeverelyLtd
    Diane Ellis, Ed.

    Sorry, but you give the average voter too much credit if you think either Jindal or Ryan will ever get to be President…

    Good point, PP. 

    There’s of course no better system, but it does mean that pigs fly before someone like Paul Ryan gets elected.  Who knows, though?  Stranger things have happened. · 2 hours ago

    Dianne, Paris, I think we’ve got our lines crossed here. I’m talking about the Representative from Wisconsin, the lanky, engaging fellow with the big smile that, in addition to being articulate concerning conservative first principles, knows the U.S. budget inside and out. He’s no slouch on foreign policy, either. That Paul Ryan.

    • #21
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    @BigGreen

    PP – I think you underestimate (as does Diane) the wisdom of the average voter.  The MSM has been biased for as long as I can remember with little impact on elections themselves so you are scared of your own shadow on that one.  I don’t think it is the independents who are going to have a problem voting for an “ethnic” candidate.  What would hold Jindal back if he ever gets into a national election is more horrific speaking performances such as the time he delivered the Republican response to President Obama’s SOU address a couple years ago.  That performance damaged him significantly.

    • #22
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    @ParisParamus

    Big Green, when analyzing cnadidate strengths and weaknesses, I do hyperfocus on the weaknesses.  On the other hand I don’t view “horrific speaking performances” as any more or less a factor than the ethnicity thingy…

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    @Percival

    That was impressive.

    My first exposure to Mr. Jindal was when he gave the response to the State of the Union Address (in 2009?).  He spoke then like he was addressing a particularly slow class of elementary school students.  Maybe someone tried to get him to slow down back then?

    His mastery of the subject matter was awesome.  He doesn’t just have this stuff nailed down — he’s got it caulked and weatherstripped too.

    • #24
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    @ParisParamus

    Re Breuer, Romney is already “all in” re immigration, so Breuer isn’t going to lose him votes on that score.  On the positive side, she is forceful, and that may get some red state voters to the polls; and she is a woman, which may count for something with swing voters–hey, for all we know, and in my opinion, sadly, the phrase First Woman VP may be the most powerful vote getting force out there.

    Romney is famous, perhaps too famous, for being a “data guy,” so I’m sure the top ten or top five will be focus group-tested–wholly appropriate to chose amongst people who seem to be equally qualified and “valuable” VP possibilities.

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    @MollieHemingway

    Thank you for posting this. I found his response to be impressive. I had only seen Jindal speak once before and I didn’t realize that he could so utterly destroy a reporter while also being engaging and powerful and knowledgeable and all that.

    I’m now curious how he interacts with general crowds …

    • #26
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    @liberaljim

    Jindal’s answer does not warrant the fawning.  The question was about  current oil prices which have little to do with supply.  I should say everything Jindal said is correct and Obama’s policies are awful.  So were Bush’s.   Making federal land available for leasing 7+ years after being elected and in response to a spike in oil prices is playing politics not having an energy policy.  We should not be energy dependent and many of the regs are nonsense.

    That said; the price spike in oil has more to do with worldwide liquidity than supply of oil.  Recently the ECB and Asian central banks joint our Fed in easing monetary policy.   Some of this cash is finding its way into the  oil markets.  Want lower prices reduce money supply and strengthen the dollar.

    Politicians of both parties exploit this issue and have not produced a  energy policy for several decades.   Both parties have opted for re-inflating the economy and just like with the bailouts the little guy is getting screwed.  Oil prices are just one result of this.

    • #27
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    @RedRules

    I am so excited about the GOP bench! I’ve seriously considered the benefits of Obama getting a second term, and thereby allowing us to run any of that bench in 4 years, instead of potentially putting a rino in there and facing the unpleasant decision of trying to replace the rino in 4 years with a real conservative.

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    @BigGreen

    I agree this response was very impressive but he could probably slow down a bit.  Some happy medium between this and the response to the SOU a couple years ago. 

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    @Percival
    RedRules: I am so excited about the GOP bench! I’ve seriously considered the benefits of Obama getting a second term, and thereby allowing us to run any of that bench in 4 years, instead of potentially putting a rino in there and facing the unpleasant decision of trying to replace the rino in 4 years with a real conservative. · 5 minutes ago

    Heck, Red.  I was thinking we should run someone off of our bench regardless of who wins in November.  If it’s one of our current field, it’ll keep him frosty.  If it’s Obama, it will depend on whether or not they let us vote from the re-education camps.

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