Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Showdown is On: Teacher’s Unions vs. Kids

 

With school districts across the country announcing their plans for next year, it’s clear that a battle is brewing, or at least should be, between teacher’s unions and parents.

On one side, the teachers, who overwhelmingly don’t want to go back to work. And the unions, of course, have their backs, because protecting teachers is their job, despite the fact that parents know their kids need to be back in classrooms come fall.

Parents in Loudon County, Virginia protested the district’s reopening plans; and this is a picture that needs to happen across the country. Thankfully they aren’t in it alone; the American Academy of Pediatrics just gave parents a great deal of ammunition in this fight against teacher’s unions pushing for extended closures. In a new statement, they explain,

With the above principles in mind, the AAP strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school. The importance of inperson learning is well-documented, and there is already evidence of the negative impacts on children because of school closures in the spring of 2020. Lengthy time away from school and associated interruption of supportive services often results in social isolation, making it difficult for schools to identify and address important learning deficits as well as child and adolescent physical or sexual abuse, substance use, depression, and suicidal ideation. This, in turn, places children and adolescents at considerable risk of morbidity and, in some cases, mortality. Beyond the educational impact and social impact of school closures, there has been substantial impact on food security and physical activity for children and families.

Policy makers must also consider the mounting evidence regarding COVID-19 in children and adolescents, including the role they may play in transmission of the infection. SARS-CoV-2 appears to behave differently in children and adolescents than other common respiratory viruses, such as influenza, on which much of the current guidance regarding school closures is based. Although children and adolescents play a major role in amplifying influenza outbreaks, to date, this does not appear to be the case with SARS-CoV-2. Although many questions remain, the preponderance of evidence indicates that children and adolescents are less likely to be symptomatic and less likely to have severe disease resulting from SARS-CoV-2 infection. In addition, children may be less likely to become infected and to spread infection. Policies to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 within schools must be balanced with the known harms to children, adolescents, families, and the community by keeping children at home.

Finally, policy makers should acknowledge that COVID-19 policies are intended to mitigate, not eliminate, risk. No single action or set of actions will completely eliminate the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, but implementation of several coordinated interventions can greatly reduce that risk. For example, where physical distance cannot be maintained, students (over the age of 2 years) and staff can wear face coverings (when feasible). In the following sections, we review some general principles that policy makers should consider as they plan for the coming school year. For all of these, education for the entire school community regarding these measures should begin early, ideally at least several weeks before the start of the school year.

If schools don’t reopen despite this clear guidance, this should be the year that Americans realize the true mission for teacher’s unions, and it has nothing to do with children. If we want our children to thrive, these unions simply cannot get their way.

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  1. JayMiller Lincoln

    Two of my daughters attend Christian universities and both are starting classes in August, business as usual. Our 16-yr old will also be starting school again in September because she’s home-schooled. I don’t think local public schools in my area (Chicago & suburbs) have yet announced their plans but to my knowledge some local private Christian schools (Protestant & Catholic) are planning to be open for students.

    • #1
    • June 28, 2020, at 7:33 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  2. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Oh, I think this is one of those cases where you stay out of the way of your enemy as it destroys itself. Keep in mind that public schools will be teaching the 1619 Project in some 3,600(?) districts this year. And they’ve been using Howard Zinn for decades. We’ve been sending our kids to lefty indoctrination camps and paying for it in levied taxes and college tuition!

    I see failure to reopen public schools (and universities) as an opportunity for major reform at best, and neutral to our kids’ and our society’s well-being at worst. Better to be uneducated than mal-educated.

    • #2
    • June 28, 2020, at 7:53 PM PDT
    • 19 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  3. CarolJoy, Above Top Secret Coolidge

    You know the elephant in the room is the insanity of the Medical Establishment in this nation.

    If 25 million Americans were now infected with malaria, and yet our health establishment would not go ahead and treat such individuals with a remedy, that is, hydroxycholorquine, people would be dying of malaria also.

    We can do one of two things right now: we can try and amp up to fight the Powers that Be on each and every decree, dictate, mandate, restriction, shelter-in-place, anti social distancing, mask wearing, contact tracing, schools being shut as kids might contaminate one another and then granma will die, leave your phone at home so you do not get traced, attend city council meetings, board of supervisor meetings, and do all of this lather rinse repeat, or we can simply start making it clear that Hydroxycloroquine is the the way to go.

     

     

    • #3
    • June 28, 2020, at 8:07 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  4. Bruce Caward Thatcher
    Bruce Caward Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    It has NEVER had to do with the kids. It is a union that represents teachers and their job situations. Kids don’t pay dues.

     

    Maybe this crazy year and its shutdowns is an opportunity for us to look at some of these institutions we’ve allowed to accrete into our conception of a society and think them over, maybe find a new way. The old way, with its bloated budgets and horrible results should get an objective look-see. Is there another way to teach our children?

    And we can also turn our attention to Colleges and Universities, and the whole way we have come in the last few decades to “educate” our next generations.

    BLM wants a revolution? Maybe we should agree, time for a revolution.

    • #4
    • June 28, 2020, at 9:25 PM PDT
    • 11 likes
  5. Al French of Damascus Moderator

    Out here in Oregon things are less transparent. The state DOE and the school districts are equivocating. They have presented three possibilities: 1) students in the classroom with social distancing; 2) students in the classroom two days a week with three days distance learning; 3) all distance learning. It is clear that #1 won’t work for physical reasons. Thirty kids won’t fit in a classroom if they are spaced six feet across. And distancing on the buses would require more buses. #3 is a continuation of what the schools did following the lockdown, which was a disaster for most families. The kids didn’t learn anything and, where both parents work, it is a nightmare for daycare. So the assumption is that most districts will adopt scenario #2. From a learning perspective it is half as good as regular school, but from the daycare perspective it is nearly as distance learning. Parents are tearing their hair out, but I doubt that the school districts are listening.

    What is not clear is whether the teachers’ unions are running the show. The educrats are hiding behind the health department. But when the governor closed the schools in March, she admitted that the reason was that staff was threatening to refuse to come to work because of fear of the virus. It is reasonable to conclude that the staff is still pulling the strings.

    • #5
    • June 28, 2020, at 9:49 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  6. J Climacus Member

    With the above principles in mind, the AAP strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school. The importance of inperson learning is well-documented, and there is already evidence of the negative impacts on children because of school closures in the spring of 2020. Lengthy time away from school and associated interruption of supportive services often results in social isolation, making it difficult for schools to identify and address important learning deficits as well as child and adolescent physical or sexual abuse, substance use, depression, and suicidal ideation. This, in turn, places children and adolescents at considerable risk of morbidity and, in some cases, mortality. Beyond the educational impact and social impact of school closures, there has been substantial impact on food security and physical activity for children and families.

    This sounds like their real concern isn’t so much what will happen with academic learning, but that kids won’t be fed and protected without school. In other words, physically attending school is necessary because it has become a substitute for the family.

     

    • #6
    • June 29, 2020, at 4:20 AM PDT
    • 10 likes
  7. Stina Member

    J Climacus (View Comment):
    In other words, physically attending school is necessary because it has become a substitute for the family.

    Yeah… that’s what I read.

    • #7
    • June 29, 2020, at 4:33 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  8. danok1 Member

    Al French of Damascus (View Comment):
    What is not clear is whether the teachers’ unions are running the show. The educrats are hiding behind the health department. But when the governor closed the schools in March, she admitted that the reason was that staff was threatening to refuse to come to work because of fear of the virus. It is reasonable to conclude that the staff is still pulling the strings.

    The union will be firmly behind the “teachers.” As Al Shakner allegedly said, “When school children start paying union dues, that’s when I’ll start representing the interests of school children.”

    • #8
    • June 29, 2020, at 4:56 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  9. Charlotte Member
    Charlotte Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Oh, I think this is one of those cases where you stay out of the way as your enemy as it destroys itself.

    I don’t have children, but this is where I come down too. Sort of an Iran-Iraq War situation.

    I’m wondering why @bethanymandel is so strongly in favor of reopening when she and her husband are homeschooling?

    • #9
    • June 29, 2020, at 5:14 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  10. I Walton Member

    My grandchildren will be changing from a first rate private school in South Bend Indiana, to public schools in North Carolina which are well above average but still public schools. Those schools are still on line so the kids will probably not use the public schools until they open class rooms. Until then, they all want to go back to home schooling by my daughter. Home schooling parents have well developed systems that are far superior to public schools. I don’t understand why this isn’t an opportunity to end teachers unions. They and the centralization they promote are the problem. Every school could be run, as they are in New Zealand for instance, independently by the teachers and the parents and every kid should be able to go to any school they qualify for. Bad teachers cause loss of students so good teachers and parents get rid of them. Basic economics works wonders, which is what New Zealand adopted across the economy when they lost pampered access to Great Britain. Instead we’re allowing left wing idiots to destroy what made us the most successful county in the history of man and our teachers unions have created them.

    • #10
    • June 29, 2020, at 5:22 AM PDT
    • 10 likes
  11. Jon1979 Lincoln

    Texas Education Agency apparently is going to let school districts across the state set their own reopening parameters, aside from a few basics, like masks and oodles of available hand sanitizer. That means the smaller school districts will likely have less problems getting classes back open than Houston ISD, in the area that’s provided the bulk of the state’s recent COVID uptick. That’s pretty much the way it should be, since states — especially those that are hundreds of miles across — shouldn’t be held hostage across the board to the problems their largest cities and/or school districts are experiencing.

    • #11
    • June 29, 2020, at 5:31 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  12. Jon1979 Lincoln

    danok1 (View Comment):

    Al French of Damascus (View Comment):
    What is not clear is whether the teachers’ unions are running the show. The educrats are hiding behind the health department. But when the governor closed the schools in March, she admitted that the reason was that staff was threatening to refuse to come to work because of fear of the virus. It is reasonable to conclude that the staff is still pulling the strings.

    The union will be firmly behind the “teachers.” As Al Shakner allegedly said, “When school children start paying union dues, that’s when I’ll start representing the interests of school children.”

    It’s going to be interesting to see how liberal parents in areas where schools are balking at reopening react, especially if they’re homeowners and are paying school property taxes. Their liberalism would mandate backing the teachers union, but their bottom line might make them wonder why they’re paying teachers $50,000-$60,000 a year and up to run online classes where it’s hard to gauge progress because there’s no direct interaction with the teacher or the rest of the class.

    Colleges are the ones most immediately threatened by that reality of what people are being asked to pay versus what their kids are getting under the COVID rules. School districts have more captive income streams due to property tax levys, but even there you might see more and more parents decide if their schools won’t let the kids leave home while still asking for the same salaries, wages and benefits, they might as well home school the kids themselves and start looking at shrinking the local school districts.

    • #12
    • June 29, 2020, at 5:39 AM PDT
    • 7 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  13. Stina Member

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Oh, I think this is one of those cases where you stay out of the way as your enemy as it destroys itself.

    I don’t have children, but this is where I come down too. Sort of an Iran-Iraq War situation.

    I’m wondering why @bethanymandel is so strongly in favor of reopening when she and her husband are homeschooling?

    I’m totally in favor of not reopening. It is the only way I get the go ahead to homeschool.

    It will result in a late start, because I’ll need to get the curriculums for my kids, but this sounds more and more like the ideal situation to me.

    • #13
    • June 29, 2020, at 5:58 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  14. Stad Thatcher

    Bethany Mandel: Unions: “. . . there is already evidence of the negative impacts on children because of school closures in the spring of 2020. Lengthy time away from school and associated interruption of supportive services often results in social isolation, making it difficult for schools to identify and address important learning deficits as well as child and adolescent physical or sexual abuse, substance use, depression, and suicidal ideation.”

    What they’re saying is not unlike what that whacko Harvard professor said about home-schooled children being sexually abused by parents. Like public schools are free of sexual abuse, drugs, and bullying. Yeah, right . . .

    • #14
    • June 29, 2020, at 5:58 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  15. MiMac Thatcher

    CarolJoy, Above Top Secret (View Comment):

    You know the elephant in the room is the insanity of the Medical Establishment in this nation.

    If 25 million Americans were now infected with malaria, and yet our health establishment would not go ahead and treat such individuals with a remedy, that is, hydroxycholorquine, people would be dying of malaria also.

    We can do one of two things right now: we can try and amp up to fight the Powers that Be on each and every decree, dictate, mandate, restriction, shelter-in-place, anti social distancing, mask wearing, contact tracing, schools being shut as kids might contaminate one another and then granma will die, leave your phone at home so you do not get traced, attend city council meetings, board of supervisor meetings, and do all of this lather rinse repeat, or we can simply start making it clear that Hydroxycloroquine is the the way to go.

    Based on what data? Unfortunately, it looks like HCQ doesn’t help. Much as I’d enjoy watching the media’s heads explode if it worked, there isn’t much to support it.

    • #15
    • June 29, 2020, at 6:20 AM PDT
    • Like
    • This comment has been edited.
  16. Bethany Mandel Editor
    Bethany Mandel

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Oh, I think this is one of those cases where you stay out of the way as your enemy as it destroys itself.

    I don’t have children, but this is where I come down too. Sort of an Iran-Iraq War situation.

    I’m wondering why @bethanymandel is so strongly in favor of reopening when she and her husband are homeschooling?

    Because the AAP is right, schools reopening is best for kids.

    • #16
    • June 29, 2020, at 7:30 AM PDT
    • Like
    • This comment has been edited.
  17. Eugene Kriegsmann Member

    As a retired teacher, I see these actions by teachers and the union that represents them as absurd. In the 45 years I spent in the classroom I got exposed to all sorts of stuff, and spent a lot of my fall and winter months sniffling or worse. It’s the job. Kids are vectors for all sorts of diseases, and when you worked in a school with a pretty large population of undocumented kids, the chance of exposure to something you weren’t immune to was pretty good. Despite that, when I retired I had accumulated somewhere over 200 days of unused sickleave. Many of my sick leave days had been donated to other teachers when they had run out.

    I believe that teachers, like medical personnel are essential in their jobs. They need to be there. If it means you have to wear a mask throughout the day and keep hand sanitizer on your desk, you do it. However, you can’t keep pulling a salary for something you aren’t doing. We all know that online classes are a failure. The barely work with college students who, hopefully, possess more motivation and discipline than secondary school kids, and certainly more than elementary kids. The whole idea is absurd. For Special Education teachers, like I was, it is worse than absurd. There is no way an IEP can be written and enacted for a student who isn’t present by a teacher who isn’t either. Those kids need the individual attention of a teacher who is there.

    If the initial forecasts for the pandemic had panned out and things had been as desperate as they were projecting, then closing the schools would have been justified. However, given the relative mildness of the disease in its current form and the fact that it doesn’t seem to affect children all that badly, it seems pretty reasonable to treat it as any other flu epidemic, and just use reasonable precautions in the classroom and school buildings.

    • #17
    • June 29, 2020, at 7:47 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  18. Charlotte Member
    Charlotte Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Bethany Mandel (View Comment):

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Oh, I think this is one of those cases where you stay out of the way as your enemy as it destroys itself.

    I don’t have children, but this is where I come down too. Sort of an Iran-Iraq War situation.

    I’m wondering why @bethanymandel is so strongly in favor of reopening when she and her husband are homeschooling?

    Because the AAP is right, schools reopening is best for kids.

    Eh, I don’t think it’s useful or accurate to just make a blanket statement like this. It depends quite a lot on exactly which kids, parents, schools, districts, curricula, etc. you’re talking about. 

    • #18
    • June 29, 2020, at 9:37 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  19. Western Chauvinist Member
    Western Chauvinist Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    Bethany Mandel (View Comment):

    Charlotte (View Comment):

    Western Chauvinist (View Comment):
    Oh, I think this is one of those cases where you stay out of the way as your enemy as it destroys itself.

    I don’t have children, but this is where I come down too. Sort of an Iran-Iraq War situation.

    I’m wondering why @bethanymandel is so strongly in favor of reopening when she and her husband are homeschooling?

    Because the AAP is right, schools reopening is best for kids.

    Eh, I don’t think it’s useful or accurate to just make a blanket statement like this. It depends quite a lot on exactly which kids, parents, schools, districts, curricula, etc. you’re talking about.

    Exactly! It’s best for Other People’s Kids seems a little . . . insensitive.

    • #19
    • June 29, 2020, at 9:47 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  20. CarolJoy, Above Top Secret Coolidge

    MiMac (View Comment):

    CarolJoy, Above Top Secret (View Comment):

    You know the elephant in the room is the insanity of the Medical Establishment in this nation.

    If 25 million Americans were now infected with malaria, and yet our health establishment would not go ahead and treat such individuals with a remedy, that is, hydroxycholorquine, people would be dying of malaria also.

    We can do one of two things right now: we can try and amp up to fight the Powers that Be on each and every decree, dictate, mandate, restriction, shelter-in-place, anti social distancing, mask wearing, contact tracing, schools being shut as kids might contaminate one another and then granma will die, leave your phone at home so you do not get traced, attend city council meetings, board of supervisor meetings, and do all of this lather rinse repeat, or we can simply start making it clear that Hydroxycloroquine is the the way to go.

    Based on what data? Unfortunately, it looks like HCQ doesn’t help. Much as I’d enjoy watching the media’s heads explode if it worked, there isn’t much to support it.

    @ThomasKennedy

    @MichaelKennedy

    We have two people here who think otherwise and one is a man whose relative got the HCQ, and the other is a doctor who has made sure it is available for himself and family.

    Yes, HCQ with the AZ pack plus zinc has not been peer reviewed or double blind tested. The main proof it has going for it is its success out in the field.

    So if you were suffering with a worsening condition of COVID, would you really & truly dismiss HCQ, & instead allow them to put you on a ventilator, which gives you only a 5% shot at surviving? Or would you utilize inductive reasoning, and think about all the various sources: Zev Zeletov in upstate New York, the nations of Japan, Turkey, and also Costa Rico, which swear by this.

    It is a shame logic is no longer taught in schools, as inductive reasoning is one of the more powerful tools all of us have. No one would let a toddler play near an open window of their 14th floor apartment, even though there are no peer reviewed, double blind studies that falls from tall buildings hurt toddlers.

    I go with inductive reasoning, as Corporate America has ensured that they are now in charge of the science laboratories.

    In the alte 1990’s, over 900 industry sponsored “scientific studies” were offered up as “proof” that toxic MTBE was so safe your kids could drink it. (A lobbyist told me that.) The public’s awareness of the power of inductive reasoning to inform them otherwise had them avoid it as much as they could. Then the one and only American study that was independent and undertaken at the behest of Gov Davis Blue Ribbon panel on MTBE proved beyond doubt it was a dangerous substance.

    • #20
    • June 29, 2020, at 10:07 AM PDT
    • Like
  21. CarolJoy, Above Top Secret Coolidge

    @mimac

    Here is my entire analysis of the role that the media played in attempting to keep the public unaware of the truth of the toxicity of MTBE, the gas additive finally banned in 1999:

    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2008/6/22/540267/-

    At the time this was playing out, Big Energy was one of the top financial interests in the nation.

    Currently Big Pharma is the number one revenue generating industry, not only here in the USA but all across the globe.

    When you have the time, give this a read and then let me know if you think differently about things.

     

     

    • #21
    • June 29, 2020, at 10:13 AM PDT
    • Like
  22. CarolJoy, Above Top Secret Coolidge

    Bruce Caward (View Comment):

    It has NEVER had to do with the kids. It is a union that represents teachers and their job situations. Kids don’t pay dues.

    Maybe this crazy year and its shutdowns is an opportunity for us to look at some of these institutions we’ve allowed to accrete into our conception of a society and think them over, maybe find a new way. The old way, with its bloated budgets and horrible results should get an objective look-see. Is there another way to teach our children?

    And we can also turn our attention to Colleges and Universities, and the whole way we have come in the last few decades to “educate” our next generations.

    BLM wants a revolution? Maybe we should agree, time for a revolution.

    I’m forgetting which discussion here led to someone pointing out that in poorer neighborhoods across America, the teachers themselves do not have literacy or math skills. So then it is next to impossible for children in those schools to learn very much.

    There are exceptions. I had a close acquaintance who taught in one very poor school and I am sure she did a lot of good.

    However, here in Calif, once a school district is 30% hispanic, the teachers that are new hires are all only semi-literate in English. There is no need for this: if California desires hispanic teachers to teach in those districts, there has to be plenty of well educated individuals with a teaching license who are fluent in English and Spanish both. (There are hispanics in the Golden State whose families go back to the 1700’s.)

    But as Tucker Carlson has pointed out, using the FAA as the example, the diversity programs in the USA give extra points to job applicants who do not have English fluency, and who do not have a good aptitude for the job they are seeking.

    Reports from people I know state this is so. Often the hispanic teachers do not even speak fluently in Spanish. One little boy I knew, his mom pulled him out of the Novato Cal school district he was attending within one week of enrollment. She had found him crying in bed because “I can’t make out a word the teacher is saying.”

    “But honey, use your Spanish – you know you understand Spanish.”

    The mom came to realize the teacher spoke some pidgen version of Spanish all day long in this classroom. 70% of her students were white, African American or Asian, but this is who was hired to teach the kids.

    • #22
    • June 29, 2020, at 10:22 AM PDT
    • 1 like
    • This comment has been edited.
  23. Al French of Damascus Moderator

    J Climacus (View Comment):

     

    With the above principles in mind, the AAP strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school. The importance of inperson learning is well-documented, and there is already evidence of the negative impacts on children because of school closures in the spring of 2020. Lengthy time away from school and associated interruption of supportive services often results in social isolation, making it difficult for schools to identify and address important learning deficits as well as child and adolescent physical or sexual abuse, substance use, depression, and suicidal ideation. This, in turn, places children and adolescents at considerable risk of morbidity and, in some cases, mortality. Beyond the educational impact and social impact of school closures, there has been substantial impact on food security and physical activity for children and families.

    This sounds like their real concern isn’t so much what will happen with academic learning, but that kids won’t be fed and protected without school. In other words, physically attending school is necessary because it has become a substitute for the family.

     

    Maybe right for the wrong reason.

    • #23
    • June 29, 2020, at 11:06 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  24. DrewInWisconsin Doesn't C… Coolidge

    As much as I’d be cheering on this battle, I need schools to reopen so I can have work again. So even though I oppose lefty indoctrination centers, I need to support my family.

    Unless there’s another publisher reading this who wants to hire a professional page compositor with 25 years of experience? Contact me here!

    • #24
    • June 29, 2020, at 2:04 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  25. ShaunaHunt Coolidge

    My husband was effectively blacklisted as a teacher in 2018 for trying to defend a studs from bullies. I have been relieved that he hasn’t been in the school system. He misses his job terribly and has a natural talent with young children. We are currently trying to figure out how to go from here. 

    He would like to teach guided reading since it is a specialty he has. As much as we dislike the system, he could make a living. He taught for 18 years and badly needs his confidence restored.

    My daughter graduated from high school this year. My son does a hybrid of public school and homeschooling because of his health issues. I’m against him going back to public school for anything. The school has become unreasonable in some areas. There is also no way to keep him from being treated as a delinquent because of his illness. 

    There’s my two cents. I think teachers need to go back so that they can support their families and themselves. We may disagree with it, but it’s the reality.

    • #25
    • June 29, 2020, at 4:27 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  26. RufusRJones Member

    Stad (View Comment):

    Bethany Mandel: Unions: “. . . there is already evidence of the negative impacts on children because of school closures in the spring of 2020. Lengthy time away from school and associated interruption of supportive services often results in social isolation, making it difficult for schools to identify and address important learning deficits as well as child and adolescent physical or sexual abuse, substance use, depression, and suicidal ideation.”

    What they’re saying is not unlike what that whacko Harvard professor said about home-schooled children being sexually abused by parents. Like public schools are free of sexual abuse, drugs, and bullying. Yeah, right . . .

    That ruling class moron really stepped in it. 

    • #26
    • June 30, 2020, at 1:49 AM PDT
    • Like
  27. RufusRJones Member

    CarolJoy, Above Top Secret (View Comment):

    Yes, HCQ with the AZ pack plus zinc has not been peer reviewed or double blind tested. The main proof it has going for it is its success out in the field.

    So if you were suffering with a worsening condition of COVID, would you really & truly dismiss HCQ, & instead allow them to put you on a ventilator, which gives you only a 5% shot at surviving? Or would you utilize inductive reasoning, and think about all the various sources: Zev Zeletov in upstate New York, the nations of Japan, Turkey, and also Costa Rico, which swear by this.

    It’s battlefield medicine and it worked. Zev Zeletov is very compelling.

    • #27
    • June 30, 2020, at 1:52 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  28. CarolJoy, Above Top Secret Coolidge

    Just about a year ago, Bethany, you were being extremely supportive of mandating vaccinations in the state of New York City.

    Some of us tried to explain that those mandates were more about increasing both the profits as well as the power and influence of the Global Medical Mafia than about the actual health of babies and children.

    Now we are inside a Kafka-esque nightmare wherein this Mafia has sworn up and down that COVID 19 is a pandemic. Every step of the way, this Mafia has made assertions, and usually within two to three weeks, the assertions are proven wrong.

    The illness did not carry the 3.4% fatality rate predicted by Neil Ferguson, Bill Gates’ proxy inside the ivory tower of Imperial College.

    Two weeks ago, Dr Fauci admitted he lied about the need for masks. He was all like: “Sure I said masks would not help. Only I was fibbing, as I wanted to ensure the medical people had enough masks.”

    The contradictions are just as upsetting as fraudulent assertions. We are led to believe the illness only is infectious when we encounter people inside small businesses, not at WalMart, CostCo, or Home Depot. Protests and riots do not spread the disease. Unless the protests are RW in nature. (Who knew a virus could discern an individual’s political affiliation?)

    If IIRC, I tried to tell you that having mandates in place meant that the Medical Mafia would be encouraged to go even further than injecting our bodies and our children’s with substances we did not care to put inside of us.

    Those here who treasure pregnancy and the resulting babies ought to understand that once citizens offer The State the power to put something inside us citizens, we probably will also be required to pull something out of us, just as soon as the Dems mandate a “one child only” rule of law.

    The other corollary that follows from allowing for vax mandates is what we are seeing now: that a very planned, well coordinated “sudden and unexpected catastrophe” could be unleashed on all of us, with vast changes in our daily life. If you do not think it was coordinated, ask how it was that in Oct 2019, legislators in Sacramento approved AB 262, which offered up unlimited power to county public health officials, as long as there was an emergency.

    Bill Gates realized some 10 years ago that his wealth, power & influence could appreciate exponentially as long as he could ensure establishing that normal daily activities would be forbidden. So he helped that occur in India, by working for Monsanto to have it be illegal for farmers to save seed from the autumn harvest to plant in the spring. He’s now made that possible here in the US, through his guided unleashing of this supposed pandemic.

    The only thing that will help us now would be injunctions against the various proposals. But the courts are bought and paid for also.

    • #28
    • June 30, 2020, at 3:37 PM PDT
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  29. CarolJoy, Above Top Secret Coolidge

    ShaunaHunt (View Comment):

    My husband was effectively blacklisted as a teacher in 2018 for trying to defend a studs from bullies. I have been relieved that he hasn’t been in the school system. He misses his job terribly and has a natural talent with young children. We are currently trying to figure out how to go from here.

    He would like to teach guided reading since it is a specialty he has. As much as we dislike the system, he could make a living. He taught for 18 years and badly needs his confidence restored.

    My daughter graduated from high school this year. My son does a hybrid of public school and homeschooling because of his health issues. I’m against him going back to public school for anything. The school has become unreasonable in some areas. There is also no way to keep him from being treated as a delinquent because of his illness.

    There’s my two cents. I think teachers need to go back so that they can support their families and themselves. We may disagree with it, but it’s the reality.

    Yes, Shauna, we do need the teachers to be back teaching. And we need kids being in school, to learn their lessons and to be around other children. If you have some time today, go over to youtube and check out various Sen Rand Paul vids – he supports your statements repeatedly.

    I am forgetting the name of the Swedish doctor and health official (Gieselke?) who explained that one of the good results of Sweden remaining open was that they had a lot of experienced nurses available. Here in the US, some reports out of places like NYC revealed that very inexperienced nurses were on the floors of the ICU’s with COVID patients.

    More experienced nurses were older and tended to have young children, for whom they needed to stay home and take care of due to the school system being shut down. In Sweden, with schools open and kids at those schools, experienced nurses were available at the hospitals to handle the serious health problem Swedish patients were facing.

    • #29
    • July 2, 2020, at 12:26 PM PDT
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