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  1. DrewInWisconsin Doesn't Care Member
    DrewInWisconsin Doesn't Care
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Listening to this now. Haven’t found a point of disagreement yet. Except, . . . where did they find the dude with the 1980s hair and glasses? Because I’m having serious flashbacks to my college years.

    • #1
  2. Sweezle Member
    Sweezle
    @Sweezle

    DrewInWisconsin Doesn't C… (View Comment):

    Listening to this now. Haven’t found a point of disagreement yet. Except, . . . where did they find the dude with the 1980s hair and glasses? Because I’m having serious flashbacks to my college years.

    The guy does have an awful lot of hair & just enough of the current “sexy men” unshaven look. Seems more current than 1980’s. 

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  3. DrewInWisconsin Doesn't Care Member
    DrewInWisconsin Doesn't Care
    @DrewInWisconsin

    I had a roommate in college who had that exact hair. And I had those glasses.

    And Derryck, I love what you said about how patronizing all the kneeling is.

    EDIT: Great interview. I also appreciate the challenge to cowardly white people like myself who fear speaking up because we’ll just get called racist if we do. (Or worse, put our jobs and our families in jeopardy.) As it’s been my personal rule never to post anything political on Facebook because I don’t want to be divisive, perhaps I will be brave and post this.

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  4. Sweezle Member
    Sweezle
    @Sweezle

    This is a truly wonderful interview. TY for posting it. BLM is a radical group that may have a number of members that mean well. But it will fail eventually because it is a black power, MalcolmX, anarchy style group and I doubt their founders & leaders will adapt. If they want to succeed long term they will pivot to a MLK movement. But that takes more courage like the journalist said. 

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  5. DonG (skeptic) Coolidge
    DonG (skeptic)
    @DonG

    Sweezle (View Comment):
    If they want to succeed long term they will pivot to a MLK movement. But that takes more courage like the journalist said. 

    The BLM org has been taken over by socialists.  Look at their manifesto and you know what they care about.  Racial division is just a tool to attack America, which stands against socialism.

    The interview is great and has a lot of wisdom.  I pray that people able to hear wisdom in a time of chaos.

    • #5
  6. Dotorimuk Coolidge
    Dotorimuk
    @Dotorimuk

    That white guy has hair Jack Lord would KILL for.

    • #6
  7. Sweezle Member
    Sweezle
    @Sweezle

    DonG (skeptic) (View Comment):

    Sweezle (View Comment):
    If they want to succeed long term they will pivot to a MLK movement. But that takes more courage like the journalist said.

    The BLM org has been taken over by socialists. Look at their manifesto and you know what they care about. Racial division is just a tool to attack America, which stands against socialism.

    The interview is great and has a lot of wisdom. I pray that people able to hear wisdom in a time of chaos.

    They were formed by Antifa, black power radicals so I am not surprised they still go with that message. But if they really wanted to make effective long term change they should pivot immediately. If all they want is financial gain they are on the right path. Corporations are falling all over themselves to virtue signal financial support.

    A nice scam that will never have the lasting change MLK had. They can be like Al Sharpton or chose to have a lasting impact on the lives of ordinary black Americans. There choice.

    • #7
  8. Sweezle Member
    Sweezle
    @Sweezle

    Dotorimuk (View Comment):

    That white guy has hair Jack Lord would KILL for.

    Unless you are a woman that loves bald men.

    • #8
  9. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Great interview.

    • #9
  10. Songwriter Inactive
    Songwriter
    @user_19450

    Derrick – Wonderfully said. You are wise beyond your years. Thanks for posting.

    • #10
  11. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    I liked how the white 80s hair guy mentioned at around 16:20 how incredibly ignorant so many people are. Apparently, on college campuses, students worried about black people don’t know that the breakdown of the black family is a big deal.

     

    @derryckgreen

    You a big Shelby Steele fan? Your erudite knowledge of white guilt makes you sound like a Steele fan?

     

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  12. Richard Fulmer Inactive
    Richard Fulmer
    @RichardFulmer

    Derryck, I agree that BLM could concentrate on things other than policing and have a positive impact, but policing does need reform.  Recall the federal study of Ferguson, Missouri that identified city’s predatory practice of using its police force to gather revenue via outrageous fines and civil asset forfeitures.  And Ferguson is hardly the only predatory city in the country.  There’s room for single-issue advocacy groups to tackle the problem.  

    • #12
  13. Derryck Green Member
    Derryck Green
    @DerryckGreen

    Sweezle (View Comment):

    This is a truly wonderful interview. TY for posting it. BLM is a radical group that may have a number of members that mean well. But it will fail eventually because it is a black power, MalcolmX, anarchy style group and I doubt their founders & leaders will adapt. If they want to succeed long term they will pivot to a MLK movement. But that takes more courage like the journalist said.

    What I’ve always found interesting that the black power movement of the 60s, the pro-black resurgence in the 90s, and now the Black Lives Matter movement is that all identify with, and adore, the “by any means necessary” mentality of Malcolm X. They also loved Malcolm’s rejection of non-violence and integration, his angry posturing against whites and America, and his aggressive style of communication. 

    However, what all these movements have ignored is his message of not-waiting-for-the-white-man-to-do-for-you-what-you-can-do-for-yourself message of conservatism (I’m not claiming he “was” a conservative but there’s a significant amount of what he did teach that overlaps with or reflects conservative principles). For the most part, he didn’t adhere to the white man is both your oppressor and the agent of your uplift nonsense that we hear from this current group of spoiled racialized brats. I’m not giving credence to his pre-Mecca views toward whites or Jews. But Malcolm X spoke a lot about clean living and self-determination, and being the masters of our own fate, that many of his followers today should heed. However, they will continue to ignore it because manipulating white guilt is much sexier than personal responsibility.

    • #13
  14. Derryck Green Member
    Derryck Green
    @DerryckGreen

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    I liked how the white 80s hair guy mentioned at around 16:20 how incredibly ignorant so many people are. Apparently, on college campuses, students worried about black people don’t know that the breakdown of the black family is a big deal.

    @derryckgreen

    You a big Shelby Steele fan? Your erudite knowledge of white guilt makes you sound like a Steele fan?

    HUGE, Steele fan. I admire his work and his very keen insight into the psychological impact of white guilt/black insecurity post civil rights. I think his wife is a psychologist, which if true, explains a lot. 

    • #14
  15. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    Richard Fulmer (View Comment):

    Derryck, I agree that BLM could concentrate on things other than policing and have a positive impact, but policing does need reform. Recall the federal study of Ferguson, Missouri that identified city’s predatory practice of using its police force to gather revenue via outrageous fines and civil asset forfeitures. And Ferguson is hardly the only predatory city in the country. There’s room for single-issue advocacy groups to tackle the problem.

    When you the police use people like an ATM, people are understandably distrustful of the police. This kind of harmful taxation via lawfare ought to be seriously addressed instead of so much other nonsense. 

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  16. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    When your movement boils down to wanting someone else of another race to fix things for you, it is not about your indepenece. I think X would be appalled.

    • #16
  17. Richard Fulmer Inactive
    Richard Fulmer
    @RichardFulmer

    There’s a tweet by Kimberly Latrice Jones that’s gone viral.  In it, she makes an impassioned defense of the looting.  Here’s my summary of her argument:

    Poor blacks are so disadvantaged compared to the rest of the world that their only chance to obtain goods is by “stepping through broken glass” to get them. The game is fixed. We played metaphorical Monopoly for 400 years. The first 350 years, we had to give everything we earned to our competitors. For the next 50 years, every time we gained anything, you [white people] burned it as you did in Rosewood [whites torched a black town in Florida in 1923 and massacred 150 of the town’s 200 people] and Tulsa [in 1921, rumors of a lynching led to an exchange of gunfire between armed groups of black and white men.  A white mob then burned down much of Greenwood, the black section of Tulsa.  36 people (26 black and 10 white) were killed].

    You ask why we burned down our own neighborhood. It’s not ours. We don’t own anything. There’s a social contract whereby if you steal or if I steal then a person in authority comes in and fixes it. But the person in authority is killing us. You broke the contract. You broke the contract when you bombed us in Tulsa and when you slaughtered us in Rosewood.

    Some of her claims are wrong:

    1. Most poor black (and white) people in the United States would be considered wealthy by the standards of most of the world’s people and middle class by Western European standards.
    2. No white (or black) person alive today was involved in either incident.
    3. Property owned by blacks was destroyed or stolen in the current BLM riots.

    Much of her justification was based on a belief in collective guilt: Because some, now dead, white people did terrible things to some black people 100 years ago, white people alive today are to blame.  The idea of collective guilt is right in line with identity politics, which seems to be the zeitgeist of the day.

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  18. DrewInWisconsin Doesn't Care Member
    DrewInWisconsin Doesn't Care
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Richard Fulmer (View Comment):
    Much of her justification was based on belief in collective guilt: Because some, now dead, white people did terrible things to some black people a 100 years ago, white people alive today are to blame. The idea of collective guilt is right in line with identity politics, which seems to be the zeitgeist of the day. 

    Sure is. And I’m even getting it from my fellow churchgoers who point out that God judged entire nations for the actions of some of its people. Okay, but he’s God. And you’re putting yourself in God’s place when you pass judgment like that.

    • #18
  19. Richard Fulmer Inactive
    Richard Fulmer
    @RichardFulmer

    DrewInWisconsin Doesn’t C… (View Comment):

    Richard Fulmer (View Comment):
    Much of her justification was based on belief in collective guilt: Because some, now dead, white people did terrible things to some black people a 100 years ago, white people alive today are to blame. The idea of collective guilt is right in line with identity politics, which seems to be the zeitgeist of the day.

    Sure is. And I’m even getting it from my fellow churchgoers who point out that God judged entire nations for the actions of some of its people. Okay, but he’s God. And you’re putting yourself in God’s place when you pass judgment like that.

    I misspelled a word on one of my posts today.  If you’re white, it’s your fault.

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  20. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    You might like Bridget Phetasy’s interview with Coach Tea on one of her Walk-Ins Welcome podcasts . . .

    • #20
  21. Dotorimuk Coolidge
    Dotorimuk
    @Dotorimuk

    Richard Fulmer (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin Doesn’t C… (View Comment):

    Richard Fulmer (View Comment):
    Much of her justification was based on belief in collective guilt: Because some, now dead, white people did terrible things to some black people a 100 years ago, white people alive today are to blame. The idea of collective guilt is right in line with identity politics, which seems to be the zeitgeist of the day.

    Sure is. And I’m even getting it from my fellow churchgoers who point out that God judged entire nations for the actions of some of its people. Okay, but he’s God. And you’re putting yourself in God’s place when you pass judgment like that.

    I misspelled a word on one of my posts today. If you’re white, it’s your fault.

    I’m kneeling.

    • #21
  22. Sisyphus (hears Xi laughing) Member
    Sisyphus (hears Xi laughing)
    @Sisyphus

    @derryckgreen, brilliant! I came to this video after a couple of weeks of rehashing these arguments while watching Antifa and BLM succeed wildly in destroying futures for all races. It is so good to hear better arguments than mine from you, a voice that in time will be listened to more and more on these things. The moral clarity is a tonic for the age.

    Keep it up. May the Lord be with you.

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  23. The Cloaked Gaijin Member
    The Cloaked Gaijin
    @TheCloakedGaijin

    Stad (View Comment):

    You might like Bridget Phetasy’s interview with Coach Tea on one of her Walk-Ins Welcome podcasts . . .

    That interview was incredible.

    • #23
  24. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Blacks are as diverse as whites…some are left, some are right. Whether we get along or not is based on ideology, not skin color. Some of the writers who are most like me are black, Walter E. Williams and Thomas Sowell. In middle class neighborhoods, we share the same values and get along. 

    I can’t get along or agree with radical lefties, no matter the race. Again, it is ideology, ideological differences that are incompatible, with no middle ground, unlike Republican and Democrat differences in the old days. 

    It is sad that so many are taught that racism and not ideology is the source of our disagreements. Believing you are hated because of something you can’t change, skin color, must give many a feeling of hopelessness. People taught to believe their current problems are due to outside factors, not to something they themselves can fix, have been doomed to fail, in many cases.

    “Systemic racism” is illogical. Why would we want to keep black people down? The best way to grow the wealth and prosperity of the country is for all of us is to succeed in life. We get more entrepreneurs, more business owners, more workers, more economic activity, less crime, more happiness. Yes, racist people exist, but they are losers and bullies with self-esteem issues. Ignore them. Surpass them. The left needs a boogie man and has decided white people should be it. Lefties are peddling a poison.

    • #24