Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. LinkedIn and Articulating the Uncomfortable

 

I wrote the following piece as an article to be posted on LinkedIn. The article can theoretically be seen by anyone with a LinkedIn account and yet since I posted it on June 1, it has only received six views and no comments. I don’t know if LinkedIn, like Twitter, engages in shadowbanning but I wouldn’t be terribly surprised if it did, since the site, as a general rule, features a large dosage of corporate virtue signaling.

Given the COVID-19 pandemic and the George Floyd incident, typical LinkedIn corporate virtue signaling about women in leadership roles, LGBTQ promotion and inclusivity, and workforce diversity based in large part on the pigment of one’s skin has taken a back seat. Posts or articles about the looting and destruction of small businesses don’t seem to register any pulse on a social media website devoted to business, business networking, employment, and entrepreneurialism. I’m not sure how to account for that, suffice to say that LinkedIn appears to be quite woke.

What Is Your Obligation as a Business Owner to Speak Out Against Looting, Arson, and Violence?
Brian Watt/President, Launch Directors, LLC

If you are reading this, then odds are you are a member of LinkedIn.

LinkedIn is a social media site explicitly created to promote businesses, for people who want to further their careers, and for providing opportunities to people to develop their skills and talents by networking and sharing information.

We can all agree that what happened to George Floyd in Minneapolis was horrific and criminal. The police officer responsible is now in a maximum-security prison awaiting justice.

Peaceful protests about what happened to Mr. Floyd have unfortunately been eclipsed and overtaken by mobs who are bent on violence and destruction or are seeking the opportunity to steal goods from retail stores. Some of the rioters and looters believe this is justifiable payback for what happened to Mr. Floyd and are hurting innocent people in the process.

Sadly some business owners have been silent in the face of such criminal activity and violence. Other business owners have expressed that this kind of unrest is to be expected. Such a sentiment unfortunately has the potential of giving tacit license to frequent and subsequent episodes of payback through violence, arson, and looting.

If you are a business owner then it is incumbent upon you to condemn the looting of stores, the rampant destruction of businesses, and the violence directed at innocent people throughout America in the clearest and the strongest possible terms. Many of these businesses are owned by black men and women who have spent decades building them only to see them looted or burned to the ground. Many of these businesses were already struggling, had laid off employees, and were losing revenue because of the COVID-19 restrictions before rioting broke out. Some of these businesses and those who own them may never return to the cities and communities that had hoped to serve.

If you own a business, put yourself in the shoes of those business owners, particularly small business owners, in cities and communities who have lost everything and may not have the means to rebuild or are inclined to rebuild again because they fear it may all happen again. Think of the future that they have just lost. At the same time, don’t think for a minute that it couldn’t happen to you or your business because there are radical elements currently active now that don’t care what kind of business you have or where it may be located. For them, anyone currently engaged in supporting the current American economy is a target.

If you don’t speak up. If you don’t demand of your political leaders to restore order and the rule of law, then the violence, the burning, the looting will only continue and the rioters will become more emboldened with each act. There aren’t enough police officers in each city to stop this. The military, beyond National Guard troops, may need to be brought in. This is a time to ask yourself why you became an entrepreneur or someone dedicated to creating and providing products and services to people in the first place and whether you want to preserve the communities you serve.

Or you could say nothing and watch everything burn. It’s your choice.

Published in General
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

There are 19 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Susan Quinn Contributor

    Oh gosh, I love it! And I expect you make some folks who are choosing to be silent uneasy at first, and then angry: who are you to tell them what to do? But anyone, particularly a business person, who is prepared to ignore, justify, or defend the rioters should be condemned, and told, “It’s not all about you, my friend.” It’s about all those people who have dared to start or manage businesses and who are losing their livelihood. Anyone who sits by can’t complain if his or her own business is destroyed. And should take a long look in the mirror.

    • #1
    • June 3, 2020, at 1:29 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  2. cdor Member
    cdor Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    How can a business owner stay silent while anarchists and deadbeats are breaking windows, stealing merchandise, and burning buildings to the ground? I don’t get it. Are they so mired in their ideology that they would give their firstborn son as a sacrifice? I’ve been a Linkedin member for years, but mostly just deleted all the “there have been 10 people searching for you…” emails. Just recently I clicked on and found, to my surprise, they had become an opinion site, of sorts. At that point one could figure what opinions would dominate.

    • #2
    • June 3, 2020, at 1:36 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
  3. Lockdowns are Precious Inactive
    Lockdowns are Precious Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    LinkedIN is the Howard the Duck of social media.

    • #3
    • June 3, 2020, at 1:37 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
  4. Bob Thompson Member

    Brian Watt: If you don’t speak up. If you don’t demand of your political leaders to restore order and the rule of law, then the violence, the burning, the looting will only continue and the rioters will become more emboldened with each act.

    I have no quarrel with your position and your suggestion. I wonder though, in those locales hit hardest, if you aren’t suggesting contacting mostly woke Democrat mayors and city council members and the same pretty much in the case of governors of several of the States.

    When I vote, regardless of what level of government, it is going to be for candidates who I already have confidence will not tolerate this lawlessness so I don’t have to go back and remind them. I guess we get the government we elect.

    • #4
    • June 3, 2020, at 1:38 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  5. Seawriter Contributor

    I like it, but I don’t read most stuff on LinkedIn. I use LinkedIn to find jobs. I hide my politics (and would even if I was liberal) because I am trying to sell my competence, not argue politics. I come to Ricochet for politics and social commentary.

    • #5
    • June 3, 2020, at 1:53 PM PDT
    • 9 likes
  6. DonG (skeptic) Coolidge

    Rioting and looting disproportionately destroys the wealth of minorities. The value of homes and businesses are reduced in the neighborhoods and the destructive action can wipe out a lifetime of savings for all those in the area. It is shameful and everyone should condemn the attacks on neighborhoods. 

    • #6
    • June 3, 2020, at 2:10 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  7. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    I like it, but I don’t read most stuff on LinkedIn. I use LinkedIn to find jobs. I hide my politics (and would even if I was liberal) because I am trying to sell my competence, not argue politics. I come to Ricochet for politics and social commentary.

    It’s sad that condemning looting and burning down of businesses somehow makes one political and/or a conservative.

    • #7
    • June 3, 2020, at 2:22 PM PDT
    • 6 likes
  8. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Bob Thompson (View Comment):

    Brian Watt: If you don’t speak up. If you don’t demand of your political leaders to restore order and the rule of law, then the violence, the burning, the looting will only continue and the rioters will become more emboldened with each act.

    I have no quarrel with your position and your suggestion. I wonder though, in those locales hit hardest, if you aren’t suggesting contacting mostly woke Democrat mayors and city council members and the same pretty much in the case of governors of several of the States.

    When I vote, regardless of what level of government, it is going to be for candidates who I already have confidence will not tolerate this lawlessness so I don’t have to go back and remind them. I guess we get the government we elect.

    Absolutely, I’m implying that business owners contact and turn up the heat on woke Democrat mayors and city council members. A number of New York business owners and many life-long Democrats are already stating that they will vote Republican this election for the first time because their civic leaders won’t act to maintain and restore order.

    One shouldn’t assume that Democrats who own businesses are complacent and willing to let this roll over them. Many are outraged.

    • #8
    • June 3, 2020, at 2:27 PM PDT
    • 5 likes
  9. Seawriter Contributor

    Brian Watt (View Comment):

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    I like it, but I don’t read most stuff on LinkedIn. I use LinkedIn to find jobs. I hide my politics (and would even if I was liberal) because I am trying to sell my competence, not argue politics. I come to Ricochet for politics and social commentary.

    It’s sad that condemning looting and burning down of businesses somehow makes one political and/or a conservative.

    Doesn’t matter. I don’t comment on apple pie and motherhood on LinkedIn either, and don’t read articles about them there as well. That is not why I am at LinkedIn. On LinkedIn I don’t care how deeply people feel about causes, whether or not I agree with them. Is it job related? Can it help me find a job or a contract? Can it help me sell one of my books, secure a talk about one of them, or gain publicity for one? That is why I am in LinkedIn. That and keeping in touch with former co-workers.

    • #9
    • June 3, 2020, at 2:38 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  10. RushBabe49 Thatcher

    I will promote this on my LinkedIn account. 

    • #10
    • June 3, 2020, at 2:53 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  11. Henry Racette Contributor

    Good post, Brian. I visited your LinkedIn account and took the liberty of leaving a comment on your article. Let’s see if you see it. (By the way, your article appears twice on my view of your LinkedIn page. No idea why. Neither shows any feedback save mine.)

    • #11
    • June 3, 2020, at 3:12 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  12. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    I will promote this on my LinkedIn account.

    Thanks, RB!

    • #12
    • June 3, 2020, at 3:46 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  13. Brian Watt Member
    Brian Watt Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    Good post, Brian. I visited your LinkedIn account and took the liberty of leaving a comment on your article. Let’s see if you see it. (By the way, your article appears twice on my view of your LinkedIn page. No idea why. Neither shows any feedback save mine.)

    One may be the article itself and the other a post that links to the article. About 40-some people have seen the post linking to the article but as of this morning there were only 6 views of the article itself. And thanks for the comment!

    • #13
    • June 3, 2020, at 3:48 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  14. RightAngles Member

    It’s a great article. I gave it a Like, but can’t comment in there because I’d lose contracts if people knew what I think. In fact, even being seen Liking it might cause me some trouble. I never thought I’d feel this way in America.

    • #14
    • June 3, 2020, at 3:55 PM PDT
    • 10 likes
  15. Henry Racette Contributor

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    It’s a great article. I gave it a Like, but can’t comment in there because I’d lose contracts if people knew what I think. In fact, even being seen Liking it might cause me some trouble. I never thought I’d feel this way in America.

    This is sad, but completely understandable.

    • #15
    • June 3, 2020, at 4:17 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  16. RightAngles Member

    Henry Racette (View Comment):

    RightAngles (View Comment):

    It’s a great article. I gave it a Like, but can’t comment in there because I’d lose contracts if people knew what I think. In fact, even being seen Liking it might cause me some trouble. I never thought I’d feel this way in America.

    This is sad, but completely understandable.

    Oops, we’re on the main feed now. Editing out certain info haha. I’m surrounded!

    • #16
    • June 3, 2020, at 4:20 PM PDT
    • 7 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  17. RushBabe49 Thatcher

    I did do a post on my LinkedIn account, praising your post. But I can’t seem to find how to ask you to join my network. I use it so seldom, I forget how! And Microsoft doesn’t make it easy.

    • #17
    • June 3, 2020, at 8:29 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  18. Steven Seward Member

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    I like it, but I don’t read most stuff on LinkedIn. I use LinkedIn to find jobs. I hide my politics (and would even if I was liberal) because I am trying to sell my competence, not argue politics. I come to Ricochet for politics and social commentary.

    I used to read some of the articles they posted on Linkedin, but so many of them have been just left-wing jibberish. A week ago I got fed up and unsubscribed from getting these worthless articles in my e-mail.

    • #18
    • June 4, 2020, at 4:55 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  19. Brian Wyneken Member

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    I like it, but I don’t read most stuff on LinkedIn. I use LinkedIn to find jobs. I hide my politics (and would even if I was liberal) because I am trying to sell my competence, not argue politics. I come to Ricochet for politics and social commentary.

    I used to read some of the articles they posted on Linkedin, but so many of them have been just left-wing jibberish. A week ago I got fed up and unsubscribed from getting these worthless articles in my e-mail.

    “Left-wing jibberish” is acceptable as work-related on LinkedIn. Commenting negatively on that is “arguing politics.” That site strikes me a mainly a forum for large corporate human capital culture. Use it for what it’s worth I guess.

    • #19
    • June 4, 2020, at 7:55 AM PDT
    • 4 likes