Without a Paddle

 

Another day, another creek. This time, I roamed near Cypress Creek out west of town.

HAM hosted their annual blood drive. All donations are welcome. If you can’t get out, don’t fret. Houston Area Mosquitoes will come to you.

They were particularly aggressive around the creek and lakes. I ended up with about 25 bites. In the words of Jimi Hendrix, “There’s a red house over yonder / That’s where mosquitoes ate my neighbor.”

On the bright side, I can’t remember the last time I encountered so many honeysuckle vines. The aroma followed me everywhere. When I was a little kid, our dad sometimes took us into the woods to pick blackberries. Sucking the sweet nectar off a honeysuckle flower was a rare treat.

One field was covered in spring wildflowers. Bluebonnets, poppies, thistles, daisies, and more crowded together in the sunlight.

One must venture farther from the city to find endless fields. But pockets of wildflowers are frequent throughout northern Harris County.

A dozen egrets stood in a field between meals. This one loitered near the primrose. Closer to the water, I encountered herons, turtles, and a pretty garter snake.

Only a pair of great egrets continued fishing at midday, in a small stream. Surrounding shrubs offered a bit of shade. Unlike the turtles, the birds didn’t seem to mind people walking by along the woodland trails.

Have you been getting out to enjoy the sunshine during this lockdown?

My previous photography adventure can be viewed here.

Published in General
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

There are 22 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    I could practically smell the honeysuckle from here! Thanks, Aaron.

    • #1
  2. sawatdeeka Member
    sawatdeeka
    @sawatdeeka

    This is so pretty. It must feel great to get out in that landscape.

    I crave a daily walk in the sun. Unfortunately, our outdoors is on a cold, damp, windy jag. This is typical March/April weather for us. The roads by the house can be muddy and icy, too, further discouraging walks. We have some “fool’s spring” days this time of year, but mostly get stuck indoors. 

    What struck me about Trump’s announcement that restrictive guidelines would continue through April was that they were able to hold that conference outdoors–and they weren’t wearing heavy outerwear–and there was green grass. Montana is still brown and gray, when not covered in a dusting of snow, at this time of year. Does spring really come that early in D.C.? 

     

     

    • #2
  3. EB Thatcher
    EB
    @EB

    Beautiful pictures! We grew up sucking the nectar out of honeysuckle blossoms, as well.

    • #3
  4. EB Thatcher
    EB
    @EB

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):
    Montana is still brown and gray, when not covered in a dusting of snow, at this time of year. Does spring really come that early in D.C.? 

    Not sure about DC. My friend has a mountain house in NC. She said they might have snow, but it is over 5000 feet altitude. Here in Port Orange, FL it is 88. This is the first time in history that I have prayed for the temps to go up. (I may be a Southerner, but I don’t like hot, hot weather.) But this year, knowing that the virus doesn’t like hot, humid weather I’m totally on board.

    • #4
  5. EB Thatcher
    EB
    @EB

    EB (View Comment):
    Montana is still brown and gray

    My cousin lives in Roberts, MT and it is 36 with a 60% chance of snow tonight.

    • #5
  6. Richard Easton Member
    Richard Easton
    @RichardEaston

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    This is so pretty. It must feel great to get out in that landscape.

    I crave a daily walk in the sun. Unfortunately, our outdoors is on a cold, damp, windy jag. This is typical March/April weather for us. The roads by the house can be muddy and icy, too, further discouraging walks. We have some “fool’s spring” days this time of year, but mostly get stuck indoors.

    What struck me about Trump’s announcement that restrictive guidelines would continue through April was that they were able to hold that conference outdoors–and they weren’t wearing heavy outerwear–and there was green grass. Montana is still brown and gray, when not covered in a dusting of snow, at this time of year. Does spring really come that early in D.C.?

    Ten years ago, we went in DC when Dad was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. It was 80 degrees at the end of March. Two years ago, I was there in mid March and it was cold and windy. March has unpredictable weather in my home town.

     

    • #6
  7. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Thanks again Aaron – and for braving those mosquitoes. I am only taking short walks because of allergies so this is such a vicarious pleasure. It makes me want to go to Texas but maybe a little earlier in the spring before the mosquitoes get really bad.

    • #7
  8. CB Toder aka Mama Toad Member
    CB Toder aka Mama Toad
    @CBToderakaMamaToad

    Very little sunshine today but I got my hands good and dirty in my yard, getting a jump start on weeds. Any day my hands get really dirty is a good day.

    I’ve been busy in my yard and garden a bunch this spring. Normally I spend hours each week in my car, driving kids to lessons and classes and rehearsals… Now they come to us via the internet, from math team to karate class to French horn lessons…

    • #8
  9. Housebroken Thatcher
    Housebroken
    @Chuckles

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Thanks again Aaron – and for braving those mosquitoes. I am only taking short walks because of allergies so this is such a vicarious pleasure. It makes me want to go to Texas but maybe a little earlier in the spring before the mosquitoes get really bad.

    Mosquitos in Texas? Just one can ruin you whole week. (FYI we used to live near Cypress Creek.)

    • #9
  10. Vance Richards Member
    Vance Richards
    @VanceRichards

    Nice pictures

    Aaron Miller: Have you been getting out to enjoy the sunshine during this lockdown? 

    Now that my commute is walking from the dining room to the living room I have had time to take a walk around the neighborhood everyday. Weather is sort of bouncing back and forth between springtime and winter. There are a couple peregrine falcons hanging out at a bridge by the reservoir. Never saw them before. My son thinks he sees where they might be setting up a nest. We will keep an eye on that as the weeks go by.

    • #10
  11. E. Kent Golding Member
    E. Kent Golding
    @EKentGolding

    Falcon Nest at GM Warren Tech Center.

    https://www.earthcam.com/usa/michigan/warren/falcon/?cam=falcon_mi

    • #11
  12. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    That’s a lot of green. The lilacs and some trees here are trying to put out buds, but there are no green leaves on trees yet. Daffodils are getting ready to put out flowers the next time we have a warm day, though.

    • #12
  13. Jimmy Carter Member
    Jimmy Carter
    @JimmyCarter

    Sunday I was down visiting Family in The Woodlands. The weather was so perfect We took the boat out for several hours checking out the million dollar homes. My face got sunburned.

    There were so many boats and jetskis out… “shelter in place” My rear.

    God Bless TEXAS.

    • #13
  14. Aaron Miller Member
    Aaron Miller
    @AaronMiller

    Housebroken (View Comment):

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Thanks again Aaron – and for braving those mosquitoes. I am only taking short walks because of allergies so this is such a vicarious pleasure. It makes me want to go to Texas but maybe a little earlier in the spring before the mosquitoes get really bad.

    Mosquitos in Texas? Just one can ruin you whole week. (FYI we used to live near Cypress Creek.)

    The photos are from a new area called Bridgeland, inside 99 and 290. It’s the latest designer town: hundreds of homes, business plazas, parks, and retention ponds doubling as scenic recreational lakes. 

    Mosquitoes are everywhere around Houston, but not so bad away from the water. A few bites are normal.

    • #14
  15. GadgetGal Thatcher
    GadgetGal
    @GadgetGal

    sawatdeeka (View Comment):

    This is so pretty. It must feel great to get out in that landscape.

    I crave a daily walk in the sun. Unfortunately, our outdoors is on a cold, damp, windy jag. This is typical March/April weather for us. The roads by the house can be muddy and icy, too, further discouraging walks. We have some “fool’s spring” days this time of year, but mostly get stuck indoors.

    What struck me about Trump’s announcement that restrictive guidelines would continue through April was that they were able to hold that conference outdoors–and they weren’t wearing heavy outerwear–and there was green grass. Montana is still brown and gray, when not covered in a dusting of snow, at this time of year. Does spring really come that early in D.C.?

     

     

    Yes, the Cherry Blossom festival is usually around the first week of April! But the weather can be quite changeable–looks like we are in for several days of dreariness.

    • #15
  16. John Park Member
    John Park
    @jpark

    The Cherry Blossom Festival in DC is, indeed, at the mercy of the weather. Some years, they bloom early and it rains. Other years, they bloom late because the conditions are not right.

    • #16
  17. sawatdeeka Member
    sawatdeeka
    @sawatdeeka

    We got about four inches of snow dumped on us last night (more inches for us than other parts in the county because our house is up higher.) It was 17 degrees this morning, and is supposed to be cold and snowy for the next few days.

    It’s been an unusually warm winter with hardly any snow–not much that stuck around, anyway. So we are making up a little of it now.

    I want to go outside . . . Looking at pictures of green landscapes and blue skies does help, though. 

    • #17
  18. Aaron Miller Member
    Aaron Miller
    @AaronMiller

    I love living in the land of evergreens. Just four hours north in Dallas, everything dies in the winter. But the price of evergreens is heat and bugs. 

    Remember that when enjoying pictures and travelogues of beautiful places. Nowhere is paradise.

    • #18
  19. NickP Coolidge
    NickP
    @NickP

    Beautiful pictures. Thanks for sharing. 

    • #19
  20. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    See, now this right here is what I’m calling for in our monthly theme “April Flowers.” Beautiful! Paddle on over to the April group writing sign up sheet, with the broad theme “April Flowers.” Yes, it is April showers and May flowers in the old rhyme, and I’ve linked the two with good cause in this particular spring season. If you have a thought on working, we still have some openings in March, so you are welcome to make however brief a post and I will be happy to link it against a past open day, capturing your thoughts into the easily searchable theme. 

    • #20
  21. Clifford A. Brown Contributor
    Clifford A. Brown
    @CliffordBrown

    Aaron Miller (View Comment):

    Housebroken (View Comment):

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Thanks again Aaron – and for braving those mosquitoes. I am only taking short walks because of allergies so this is such a vicarious pleasure. It makes me want to go to Texas but maybe a little earlier in the spring before the mosquitoes get really bad.

    Mosquitos in Texas? Just one can ruin you whole week. (FYI we used to live near Cypress Creek.)

    The photos are from a new area called Bridgeland, inside 99 and 290. It’s the latest designer town: hundreds of homes, business plazas, parks, and retention ponds doubling as scenic recreational lakes.

    Mosquitoes are everywhere around Houston, but not so bad away from the water. A few bites are normal.

    Speaking of a few bites, the Houston Chronicle helpfully reminds people: “Coronavirus will not stop alligator and snake season.” So, there is that.

    • #21
  22. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):
    Speaking of a few bites, the Houston Chronicle helpfully reminds people: “Coronavirus will not stop alligator and snake season.” So, there is that.

    But wild pigs, maybe? 

    • #22