The Most Succinct Movie Review of the Summer

 

The film reviewer for the Weekly Standard, John Podhoretz normally devotes 800 words or so to every movie he sees. In the case of the most recent release, however, JPod has made an exception. Posted on Facebook mere moments ago:

John Podhoretz
If you have any interest in seeing “The Odd Life of Timothy Green,” unfriend me.

There are 41 comments.

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  1. John Marzan Inactive

    where can i download the movie?

    • #1
    • August 15, 2012, at 2:43 AM PDT
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  2. Percival Thatcher

    Economy.

    • #2
    • August 15, 2012, at 3:05 AM PDT
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  3. Cornelius Julius Sebastian Inactive

    Classic.

    • #3
    • August 15, 2012, at 3:11 AM PDT
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  4. Caroline Thatcher

    Part of the movie was filmed in my neighborhood and that’s my only reason to see it. On the other hand, it’ll be on Netflix or Amazon Prime soon enough, so I can wait.

    • #4
    • August 15, 2012, at 4:08 AM PDT
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  5. Wade Moore Member
    Lady Bertrum: BAZONGA! (I’ve been watching Big Bang Theory reruns.) · 6 hours ago

    The correct phrasing is Bazinga! How do I know? I have a tee-shirt with that on it…

    • #5
    • August 15, 2012, at 4:16 AM PDT
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  6. Wade Moore Member

    Maybe at the end of the movie Michelle O. comes over and they eat the kid? 

    • #6
    • August 15, 2012, at 4:17 AM PDT
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  7. Foxman Inactive

    Ranks with: “The covers of this book are too far apart.” — Ambrose Bierce

    • #7
    • August 15, 2012, at 4:51 AM PDT
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  8. Skyler Coolidge

    But for those of us who had never even heard of this movie or know much about Podhoretz, the review for all itssuccinctness is less than helpful. 

    • #8
    • August 15, 2012, at 5:03 AM PDT
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  9. Edward Smith Inactive

    Das cold!

    • #9
    • August 15, 2012, at 6:07 AM PDT
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  10. E. Blackadder Inactive

    This is quite unhelpful indeed. For all I know, they left his scenes on the cutting-room floor.

    • #10
    • August 15, 2012, at 6:26 AM PDT
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  11. DrewInWisconsin, Influencer Member
    Skyler: But for those of us who had never even heard of this movie or know much about Podhoretz, the review for all itssuccinctness is less than helpful.

    The only reason I know about it is that for some reason the movie is paired with a “sock drive” to benefit rescue missions. A local organization asked us to place a “sock drive” box at our church. For various reasons, we decided not to join in, but one of those reasons was not knowing whether we should be essentially promoting this movie with the big ol’ movie-poster/sock-drive box. I checked out the trailer online, and couldn’t figure out this story could work. All I could think was “It’ll all end badly, I just know it!”

    • #11
    • August 15, 2012, at 6:32 AM PDT
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  12. Aaron Miller Member

    “Green” is automatic cause for suspicion these days.

    Plus, the concept reminds me of an old Czech folktale in which a turnip turns into a son and grows up to devour people.

    • #12
    • August 15, 2012, at 7:02 AM PDT
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  13. DrewInWisconsin, Influencer Member
    Aaron Miller:

    Plus, the concept reminds me of an old Czech folktale in which a turnip turns into a son and grows up to devour people.

    Like I said, “It’ll all end badly . . .”

    • #13
    • August 15, 2012, at 7:16 AM PDT
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  14. Mollie Hemingway Contributor
    Aaron Miller: “Green” is automatic cause for suspicion these days.

    Plus, the concept reminds me of an old Czech folktale in which a turnip turns into a son and grows up to devour people. · 37 minutes ago

    Yes! “Otesánek” I always thought it was a tree stump rather than a turnip but maybe I’m just influenced by the Jan and Eva Švankmajerová movie based on same.

    • #14
    • August 15, 2012, at 7:40 AM PDT
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  15. Stephen Dawson Inactive

    Hmmm. The writer/director is responsible for writing such works as What’s Eating Gilbert Grape and About A Boy. I’m quite prepared to give him the benefit of the doubt until I see it for myself. Until you’ve read fifty or a hundred reviews by a film critic of movies that you yourself have seen, you simply cannot trust him or her. Even those numbers may not be enough.

    I write that as a film critic (amongst other things) myself.

    • #15
    • August 15, 2012, at 7:53 AM PDT
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  16. Stephen Dawson Inactive

    In fact, the more I reflect on this ‘review’, the more irritated I feel. I’d jump in very hard indeed, except having heard Mr Podhoretz on the Podcast a few times, I’m kind of partial to his opinions.

    Nevertheless, as a person who writes reviews for a living, and have written more than three thousand, I find it anathema to rely on my ‘authority’ in my reviews. I argue my case. Has Podhoretz seen the movie or does he find its premise abhorrent? He is saying that I’m unworthy even of the degraded status of Facebook friendship because I might find the possibility of seeing the movie interesting?

    Mr Robinson, I appreciate a cutting repudiation of something as much as (perhaps more than) most. But it needs to make an argument, not be an ex cathedra pronouncement.

    • #16
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:02 AM PDT
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  17. Amy Schley Moderator

    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/the_odd_life_of_timothy_green/reviews/?type=top_critics

    For those wanting a more detailed review …

    • #17
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:06 AM PDT
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  18. captainpower Inactive

    Agreed with Stephen Dawson and others.

    I’m ignorant about the movie.

    I continue to be ignorant.

    • #18
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:10 AM PDT
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  19. Stephen Dawson Inactive
    Aaron Miller: … the concept reminds me of an old Czech folktale in which a turnip turns into a son and grows up to devour people. · 1 hour ago

    Cameron Diaz: ‘It’s been said that in Hollywood there are only 14 different scripts. Well, this is number 15.’ She was speaking of Being John Malkovich. Nearly all of Hollywood’s product is repetition and reinterpretation. If something relies on a previously cinematically unexplored folk tale, that may well be for the good.

    • #19
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:14 AM PDT
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  20. Stephen Dawson Inactive

    I fear that the ‘repetition and reinterpretation’ in my previous comment may be considered a dismissal. But it isn’t at all. Something new has its own value, but the retelling in a new way of something old is very nearly as worthy.

    • #20
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:19 AM PDT
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  21. DrewInWisconsin, Influencer Member
    Stephen Dawson

    Cameron Diaz: ‘It’s been said that in Hollywood there are only 14 different scripts. Well, this is number 15.’ She was speaking of Being John Malkovich.

    I’ll stick with the first 14. Number 15 made me want to vomit.

    • #21
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:30 AM PDT
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  22. Stephen Dawson Inactive

    Drew, I loved Number 15, and Number 16 even more! But perhaps I’m strange.

    • #22
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:44 AM PDT
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  23. dreamlarge Inactive
    Stephen Dawson

    Cameron Diaz: ‘It’s been said that in Hollywood there are only 14 different scripts.

    Wait! I was taught there are 33 plot lines. Period. Not 14. Not that I should expect Cameron Diaz to be a sage, but I throw that tidbit of useless information around occasionally…so I will be embarrassed if it is not true. lol.

    Commercials for the green baby movie run incessantly here in the Philadelphia market. I am offended by the very premise of the film. Plus the commercials make it clear that there is an “agenda” being advanced. Pass. I actually scrunch up my nose when the commercials come on.

     John Podhoretz…brevity is the soul of wit. Touché. 

    *edited to correct a number. Math. How sad is that?*

    • #23
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:51 AM PDT
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  24. Doctor Bass Monkey Inactive

    John is clearly a man of discriminating taste.

    • #24
    • August 15, 2012, at 8:59 AM PDT
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  25. Scott R Member

    Funny that friend and unfriend are officially now verbs, even for Jeopardy-champ neoconservative intellectuals.

    Hi Peter.

    • #25
    • August 15, 2012, at 9:04 AM PDT
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  26. DrewInWisconsin, Influencer Member
    Stephen Dawson: Drew, I loved Number 15, and Number 16 even more! But perhaps I’m strange. · 10 minutes ago

    My cousin loved Number 15, too. So I saw it based on her recommendation. Now I have to re-evaluate our relationship.

    • #26
    • August 15, 2012, at 9:04 AM PDT
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  27. Lady Bertrum Inactive

    BAZONGA! (I’ve been watching Big Bang Theory reruns.)

    • #27
    • August 15, 2012, at 9:23 AM PDT
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  28. AmishDude Member

    It’s no Red Letter Media review, that’s true.

    • #28
    • August 15, 2012, at 9:23 AM PDT
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  29. Eeyore Member

    During his latest cruise on the Ricochet Flagship, JPod indicated that he forsworn Twitter cold turkey (or possibly cold poult, given the character limitations?). 

    He certainly has not, however, abandoned his signal talent in Short-Form Snark.

    • #29
    • August 15, 2012, at 9:28 AM PDT
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  30. DocJay Inactive

    Not quite the level of our commander in Bastogne sending a reply to a surrender request with “Nuts”, but it’s close.

    • #30
    • August 15, 2012, at 9:34 AM PDT
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